Students

MHIS1001 – Forging the West: A World History of Europe, 1215-1788

2021 – Session 1, Weekday attendance, North Ryde

Notice

As part of Phase 3 of our return to campus plan, most units will now run tutorials, seminars and other small group activities on campus, and most will keep an online version available to those students unable to return or those who choose to continue their studies online.

To check the availability of face-to-face and online activities for your unit, please go to timetable viewer. To check detailed information on unit assessments visit your unit's iLearn space or consult your unit convenor.

General Information

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Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit co-convenor
Nicholas Baker
B263, Level 2, 25B Wally's Walk
TBA - Please refer to iLearn
Unit co-convenor
Clare Monagle
B271, Level 2, 25B Wally's Walk
TBA - Please refer to iLearn
Credit points Credit points
10
Prerequisites Prerequisites
Corequisites Corequisites
Co-badged status Co-badged status
Unit description Unit description

In 1215 CE, a Mongol army led by Genghis Khan conquered the Chinese city of Zongdhu (present-day Beijing), creating the basis for the largest contiguous land empire in human history. That same year, leaders of the Latin Church met for the Fourth Lateran Council in Rome at the other end of Eurasia, establishing western European Christian doctrine for the next three centuries. These civilizations soon came into contact as the Mongol Empire enabled commerce and cultural exchange between east and west Eurasia. This unit explores how the increasingly complex network of connections that linked Europe and the wider world between the High Middle Ages and the eve of the modern era helped to create the particular society and culture that we today frequently refer to as “the West.” We focus on the historical contingency of this creation and the ways that both European and non-European influences and factors forged the idea of the West. From medieval encounters between Christianity and Islam to eighteenth-century encounters between Pacific Islanders and Europeans, from the thirteenth-century Eurasian economic world system to the truly global economy that emerged after 1500, from the horseback empire of the Mongols to the martime empires built by European states, we explore the transformation of the premodern world. The unit considers these processes from both European and non-European perspectives.

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at https://students.mq.edu.au/important-dates

Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of this unit, you will be able to:

  • ULO1: Understand and explain the ways in which religion, trade, and empire connected the premodern world.
  • ULO2: Read, evaluate, and ask questions of a variety of historical sources, locating them in their appropriate contexts.
  • ULO3: Analyze and assess the impact that various events, movements and ideas had on the creation of the premodern world, producing a complex picture of this world.
  • ULO4: Synthesise primary and secondary sources to develop clear, specific, evidence-based arguments in response to historical questions.

General Assessment Information

Late Submission

Unless a Special Consideration request has been submitted and approved, (a) a penalty for lateness will apply – two (2) marks out of 100 will be deducted per day for assignments submitted after the due date – and (b) no assignment will be accepted more than seven (7) days (incl. weekends) after the original submission deadline. No late submissions will be accepted for timed assessments – i.e. the weekly quiz.

Turnitin will close at the deadline for submission of each written assessment tasks. Late submissions will need to be emailed direct to A/Prof. Baker and accompanied by an explanation for their lateness.

Extensions

Students who encounter difficulties in meeting the deadlines for written assessment tasks should apply for an extension via ask.mq.edu in advance of the due date. Students should familiarize themselves with the University's Special Consideration policy  (see Policies and Procedures) before submitting such a request.

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Hurdle Due
Weekly Quiz 20% No Ongoing, Weeks 2-12
Document Exercise 30% No 19/04/21 (Week 7)
Reflective Essay 50% No 04/06/21 (Week 13)

Weekly Quiz

Assessment Type 1: Quiz/Test
Indicative Time on Task 2: 1 hours
Due: Ongoing, Weeks 2-12
Weighting: 20%

 

Short weekly quiz

 


On successful completion you will be able to:
  • Understand and explain the ways in which religion, trade, and empire connected the premodern world.
  • Read, evaluate, and ask questions of a variety of historical sources, locating them in their appropriate contexts.

Document Exercise

Assessment Type 1: Case study/analysis
Indicative Time on Task 2: 30 hours
Due: 19/04/21 (Week 7)
Weighting: 30%

 

Primary source analysis

 


On successful completion you will be able to:
  • Understand and explain the ways in which religion, trade, and empire connected the premodern world.
  • Read, evaluate, and ask questions of a variety of historical sources, locating them in their appropriate contexts.
  • Synthesise primary and secondary sources to develop clear, specific, evidence-based arguments in response to historical questions.

Reflective Essay

Assessment Type 1: Essay
Indicative Time on Task 2: 45 hours
Due: 04/06/21 (Week 13)
Weighting: 50%

 

Reflective essay

 


On successful completion you will be able to:
  • Understand and explain the ways in which religion, trade, and empire connected the premodern world.
  • Read, evaluate, and ask questions of a variety of historical sources, locating them in their appropriate contexts.
  • Analyze and assess the impact that various events, movements and ideas had on the creation of the premodern world, producing a complex picture of this world.
  • Synthesise primary and secondary sources to develop clear, specific, evidence-based arguments in response to historical questions.

1 If you need help with your assignment, please contact:

  • the academic teaching staff in your unit for guidance in understanding or completing this type of assessment
  • the Learning Skills Unit for academic skills support.

2 Indicative time-on-task is an estimate of the time required for completion of the assessment task and is subject to individual variation

Delivery and Resources

Classes

In S1 2021, lectures will be pre-recorded and available via iLearn due to Covid restrictions.

Tutorials will be offered both in-person and in synchronous online meetings. 

For tutorial times and locations (for on-campus offerings) please consult the University timetable: https://timetables.mq.edu.au/2021/

Required Texts

Required readings--a variety of primary source documents and secondary source readings--will be listed week-by-week on the iLearn site and available via Leganto through the University Library.

Per Faculty of Arts policy, all required readings are available on-line only but it is recommended that students print out the required readings and read them in hard copy as pedagogical research suggests that comprehension and recall are superior when reading hard copy text as opposed to reading on-line. Students should have the readings to hand (either in hard-copy or digital form) for their tutorial.

Technologies Used and Required

This unit uses iLearn. All students are expected to have internet access, use of a computer, and fundamental computer skills.

Unit Schedule

Week 1: The Medieval World

Week 2: Christendom and Encounter

Week 3: Structures of Authority

Week 4: Crisis in the Fourteenth Century

Week 5: Cultural and Economic Revival

Week 6: New Worlds

Week 7: Reformations

Week 8: Leviathan

Week 9: Scientific Transitions

Week 10: Atlantic Triangles

Week 11: Enlightenment and Commerce

Week 12: Pacific Encounters and Exploitation

Week 13: Writing Week

Policies and Procedures

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central (https://policies.mq.edu.au). Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Students seeking more policy resources can visit Student Policies (https://students.mq.edu.au/support/study/policies). It is your one-stop-shop for the key policies you need to know about throughout your undergraduate student journey.

To find other policies relating to Teaching and Learning, visit Policy Central (https://policies.mq.edu.au) and use the search tool.

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/admin/other-resources/student-conduct

Results

Results published on platform other than eStudent, (eg. iLearn, Coursera etc.) or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent. For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au or if you are a Global MBA student contact globalmba.support@mq.edu.au

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Learning Skills

Learning Skills (mq.edu.au/learningskills) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to help you improve your marks and take control of your study.

The Library provides online and face to face support to help you find and use relevant information resources. 

Student Enquiry Service

For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at ask.mq.edu.au

If you are a Global MBA student contact globalmba.support@mq.edu.au

Equity Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

IT Help

For help with University computer systems and technology, visit http://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/information_technology/help/

When using the University's IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use of IT Resources Policy. The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network including students.