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LING3390 – Phonological Analysis

2021 – Session 2, Special circumstances

Session 2 Learning and Teaching Update

The decision has been made to conduct study online for the remainder of Session 2 for all units WITHOUT mandatory on-campus learning activities. Exams for Session 2 will also be online where possible to do so.

This is due to the extension of the lockdown orders and to provide certainty around arrangements for the remainder of Session 2. We hope to return to campus beyond Session 2 as soon as it is safe and appropriate to do so.

Some classes/teaching activities cannot be moved online and must be taught on campus. You should already know if you are in one of these classes/teaching activities and your unit convenor will provide you with more information via iLearn. If you want to confirm, see the list of units with mandatory on-campus classes/teaching activities.

Visit the MQ COVID-19 information page for more detail.

General Information

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Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit Convenor & Lecturer
Anita Szakay
Margaret Wood
Credit points Credit points
10
Prerequisites Prerequisites
50cp at 2000 level or above including (LING2217 or LING217)
Corequisites Corequisites
Co-badged status Co-badged status
Unit description Unit description

Phonology is the study of sound patterns in language - which sounds are used by different languages, how they are organized, and how sounds are represented in the mind. In this unit we will examine phonological theory, phonological organisation of speech, acquisition of phonology and issues relevant to phonological disorders. Topics to be addressed include: variation in sound structure between languages (e.g., English and Indigenous Australian languages), the phonology of tone languages (such as Chinese), sound change, and prosody (stress and rhythm in language), and morphophonology. Our focus will be on phonological data analysis (i.e. logic puzzle solving) using two approaches: Rule-Based Phonology and Optimality Theory.

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at https://www.mq.edu.au/study/calendar-of-dates

Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of this unit, you will be able to:

  • ULO1: Communicate an understanding of fundamental phonological concepts including feature, phoneme, syllable, gesture, rule, constraint, underlying representation and surface form.
  • ULO2: Explain and illustrate phonological processes, and their role in shaping language sounds.
  • ULO3: Analyse the phonological structure of a language from example data.
  • ULO4: Analyse phonological phenomena, and explain how they can be described under different phonological frameworks.

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Hurdle Due
Quizzes 10% No W3, W5, W8, W10, W13
Final Exam 40% No during exam period
Problem Set Two 25% No W12
Problem Set One 25% No W7

Quizzes

Assessment Type 1: Quiz/Test
Indicative Time on Task 2: 5 hours
Due: W3, W5, W8, W10, W13
Weighting: 10%

 

In a total of 5 quizzes students will demonstrate their understanding of the prescribed reading material for each topic. Each quiz will comprise ten questions and will be automatically graded in iLearn.

 


On successful completion you will be able to:
  • Communicate an understanding of fundamental phonological concepts including feature, phoneme, syllable, gesture, rule, constraint, underlying representation and surface form.
  • Explain and illustrate phonological processes, and their role in shaping language sounds.

Final Exam

Assessment Type 1: Examination
Indicative Time on Task 2: 20 hours
Due: during exam period
Weighting: 40%

 

In a series of short answers and extended responses, students will demonstrate all aspects of their understanding of phonological concepts and data analysis.

 


On successful completion you will be able to:
  • Communicate an understanding of fundamental phonological concepts including feature, phoneme, syllable, gesture, rule, constraint, underlying representation and surface form.
  • Explain and illustrate phonological processes, and their role in shaping language sounds.
  • Analyse the phonological structure of a language from example data.
  • Analyse phonological phenomena, and explain how they can be described under different phonological frameworks.

Problem Set Two

Assessment Type 1: Problem set
Indicative Time on Task 2: 20 hours
Due: W12
Weighting: 25%

 

In a series of short answer responses, students will account for phonological phenomena in the dataset(s) provided. Problem Set Two will assess the topics of Morphophonology and Rule Ordering and Syllable, Prosody, and Stress. The assessment will provide an opportunity to demonstrate insights into the sound structure of the language(s) being analysed, an understanding of phonological theory, and its application to the data. Word count: 2000.

 


On successful completion you will be able to:
  • Communicate an understanding of fundamental phonological concepts including feature, phoneme, syllable, gesture, rule, constraint, underlying representation and surface form.
  • Explain and illustrate phonological processes, and their role in shaping language sounds.
  • Analyse the phonological structure of a language from example data.
  • Analyse phonological phenomena, and explain how they can be described under different phonological frameworks.

Problem Set One

Assessment Type 1: Problem set
Indicative Time on Task 2: 20 hours
Due: W7
Weighting: 25%

 

In a series of short answer responses, students will account for phonological phenomena in the dataset(s) provided. Problem Set One will assess the topics of Features and Natural classes, Rules. The assessment will provide an opportunity to demonstrate insights into the sound structure of the language(s) being analysed, an understanding of phonological theory, and its application to the data. Word count: 2000.

 


On successful completion you will be able to:
  • Communicate an understanding of fundamental phonological concepts including feature, phoneme, syllable, gesture, rule, constraint, underlying representation and surface form.
  • Explain and illustrate phonological processes, and their role in shaping language sounds.
  • Analyse the phonological structure of a language from example data.
  • Analyse phonological phenomena, and explain how they can be described under different phonological frameworks.

1 If you need help with your assignment, please contact:

  • the academic teaching staff in your unit for guidance in understanding or completing this type of assessment
  • the Writing Centre for academic skills support.

2 Indicative time-on-task is an estimate of the time required for completion of the assessment task and is subject to individual variation

Delivery and Resources

This unit is taught over 13 weeks. Each week, students will attend both a lecture and a tutorial/workshop. Before attending each lecture, students will have read the set readings. After attending the lecture and before the tutorial, they revisit the set readings and prepare the solutions to the weekly assignments. They bring a copy to the workshop in order to discuss the solutions.

A proper understanding of phonology can only be gained by broad and attentive reading of the literature, and dedicated thinking about how these ideas apply to language data. You will not be able to pass this unit by simply scanning the lecture notes each week. If you read continuously, compile your own notes, take a thorough attempt at the weekly assignments, ask questions about the theory, and think about language structure, you should do well in this unit, and find it rewarding and relevant to your further studies and careers. If you do not prepare adequately for class and fail to take responsibility for your own learning, you will struggle.

We strongly encourage note-taking with pen-and blank paper rather than on laptops or other electronic devices. Pen-and-paper note taking facilitates the non-linear thinking strategies required for phonological analysis.

Online Lectures

Lectures are designed to summarize and reinforce the key ideas that you have already encountered in your own reading of the literature, not to introduce you to material for the first time.

Online OR Face-to-Face Tutorials

The weekly tutorial assignment invite you to apply the learned phonological concepts to real language data or formulate your own stance regarding a theoretical issue. Students will be invited to share their solutions during the tutorial. Preparation of the tutorial assignments constitutes exam preparation; the discussion of the assignments during the tutorials constitutes feedback on your current understanding and analysis skills.

The tutorial/workshop sessions are designed to further consolidate the phonological concepts, discuss and further illustrate the application to real language data. Attendance at and participation in tutorials will contribute to learning how to communicate, explain, and illustrate phonological concepts and processes (learning outcomes 1 and 2). Tutorials will provide extensive practice in analysing phonological data and explaining them under different phonological frameworks (learning outcomes 4 and 5).

Tutorial Attendance

Attendance at and participation in tutorials is expected and class rolls will be taken. No recordings will be available for the interactive and problem-based weekly tutorial classes. Students are, therefore, strongly encouraged to attend all tutorials during semester.

Workload

3 credit points, amounting to 10 hours per week or 135 hours in total.

26 hours lectures                                              13 lectures; 2 hours per week

19.5 hours workshops/labs/tutorials                 13 tutorials; 1.5 hours per week

50 hours assessment tasks                              4 assessment tasks;  10-15 hours each

39 hours class preparation                               3 hours, for example:  1.5 hrs reading lecture materials +  1.5 hrs preparing tutorial worksheet

Requesting an extension to assignment due date

On occasion, you may be in a situation when you aren't able to submit an assessment task on time. Extensions are only given in special circumstances, by completing a Special Consideration request. For more information on Special Consideration, see https://students.mq.edu.au/study/my-study-program/special-consideration  

Late submission of assignments

If you haven't been approved for an extension and you submit your assessment task late, penalties are applied. You should consult your unit convenor if you are in this position. Late submissions will receive a 5% per day penalty. If you submit the assessment task 10 days or more beyond the due date, without an approved extension, you will be awarded a maximum of 50% of the overall assessment marks. Weekends and public holidays are included.

Technologies used and required

Word processing and conversion to pdf file format is needed for completing both Problem Sets One and Two; internet access is needed for downloading lecture and tutorial materials and for uploading assignments. No other technologies.

Required textbook:

  • Hayes (2011). Introductory Phonology. Oxford, UK: Wiley-Blackwell. 

Secondary (recommended) textbooks:

  • Gussenhoven & Jacobs (2013). Understanding Phonology (3rd ed). Taylor & Francis Group.
  • Gussenhoven & Jacobs (207). Understanding Phonology (4th ed). Abingdon, Oxon ; New York, NY: Routledge.
  • Kennedy (2017). Phonology: A Coursebook. Cambridge University Press.
  • Kager (1999). Optimality Theory. Utrecht, The Netherlands: Cambridge University Press.
  • Zsiga (2013). The Sounds of Language: an introduction to phonetics and phonology. Hoboken: Wiley-Blackwell

Unit Schedule

  • W1 - Introduction & Refresher
  • W2 - Distinctive Features & Natural Classes I.
  • W3 - DistinctiveFeatures & Natural Classes II.
  • W4 - Phonological Rules
  • W5 - Introduction to Morphophonology
  • W6 - Morphophonology & Rule Ordering I.
  • W7 - Morphophonology & Rule Ordering II.
  • W8 - Syllables & Feet
  • W9 - Stress Rules
  • W10 - Stress Systems
  • W11 - Optimality Theory I.
  • W12 - Optimality Theory II.
  • W13 - Exam Revision

Policies and Procedures

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central (https://policies.mq.edu.au). Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Students seeking more policy resources can visit Student Policies (https://students.mq.edu.au/support/study/policies). It is your one-stop-shop for the key policies you need to know about throughout your undergraduate student journey.

To find other policies relating to Teaching and Learning, visit Policy Central (https://policies.mq.edu.au) and use the search tool.

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/admin/other-resources/student-conduct

Results

Results published on platform other than eStudent, (eg. iLearn, Coursera etc.) or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent. For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au or if you are a Global MBA student contact globalmba.support@mq.edu.au

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Learning Skills

Learning Skills (mq.edu.au/learningskills) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to help you improve your marks and take control of your study.

The Library provides online and face to face support to help you find and use relevant information resources. 

Student Services and Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

Student Enquiries

For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at ask.mq.edu.au

If you are a Global MBA student contact globalmba.support@mq.edu.au

IT Help

For help with University computer systems and technology, visit http://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/information_technology/help/

When using the University's IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use of IT Resources Policy. The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network including students.