Students

ABST2060 – Indigenous Histories and Knowledges

2021 – Session 2, Weekday attendance, North Ryde

Session 2 Learning and Teaching Update

The decision has been made to conduct study online for the remainder of Session 2 for all units WITHOUT mandatory on-campus learning activities. Exams for Session 2 will also be online where possible to do so.

This is due to the extension of the lockdown orders and to provide certainty around arrangements for the remainder of Session 2. We hope to return to campus beyond Session 2 as soon as it is safe and appropriate to do so.

Some classes/teaching activities cannot be moved online and must be taught on campus. You should already know if you are in one of these classes/teaching activities and your unit convenor will provide you with more information via iLearn. If you want to confirm, see the list of units with mandatory on-campus classes/teaching activities.

Visit the MQ COVID-19 information page for more detail.

General Information

Download as PDF
Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff
Zac Roberts
Tristan Kennedy
Credit points Credit points
10
Prerequisites Prerequisites
ABST1020 or ABST1000
Corequisites Corequisites
Co-badged status Co-badged status
Unit description Unit description
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are recognised as belonging to the oldest living culture on earth with over 60,000 years of histories and knowledges to draw upon. This unit explores Indigenous histories and knowledges from the big bang through to contemporary times. Students will develop an understanding of Indigenous relationships to land, water, fire, food and medicine and recognise the ways in which Indigenous knowledges are utilised in everyday activities. This unit will provide a significant understanding of how Indigenous knowledges about the world can inform future thinking about conservation, land management, climate change and sustainability.

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at https://students.mq.edu.au/important-dates

Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of this unit, you will be able to:

  • ULO1: Identify Indigenous Australians' contemporary and historical contributions to knowledge in scientific and community fields.
  • ULO2: Recognise the diversity of Indigenous knowledges and in fields of science, technology, land and Country.
  • ULO3: Analyse and reflect on the on-going relationship of Indigenous and non-indigenous knowledges.
  • ULO4: Demonstrate a critical, self-reflective approach to the study of Indigenous histories, based on respect and mutual responsibility.
  • ULO5: Communicate effectively, in a range of written and spoken formats, within the conventions of the discipline of Indigenous Studies.

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Hurdle Due
Major Essay 40% No 05/11/2021
Minor Essay 30% No 03/09/2021
Tutorial Activities 30% No Weekly

Major Essay

Assessment Type 1: Essay
Indicative Time on Task 2: 40 hours
Due: 05/11/2021
Weighting: 40%

Students will choose a question related to a particular area of Indigenous histories and knowledges and produce a critical essay that is informed by relevant Indigenous Studies literature.


On successful completion you will be able to:
  • Analyse and reflect on the on-going relationship of Indigenous and non-indigenous knowledges.
  • Demonstrate a critical, self-reflective approach to the study of Indigenous histories, based on respect and mutual responsibility.
  • Communicate effectively, in a range of written and spoken formats, within the conventions of the discipline of Indigenous Studies.

Minor Essay

Assessment Type 1: Essay
Indicative Time on Task 2: 20 hours
Due: 03/09/2021
Weighting: 30%

Students will produce an essay which responds to one of a choice of questions related to unit content


On successful completion you will be able to:
  • Identify Indigenous Australians' contemporary and historical contributions to knowledge in scientific and community fields.
  • Recognise the diversity of Indigenous knowledges and in fields of science, technology, land and Country.
  • Analyse and reflect on the on-going relationship of Indigenous and non-indigenous knowledges.
  • Communicate effectively, in a range of written and spoken formats, within the conventions of the discipline of Indigenous Studies.

Tutorial Activities

Assessment Type 1: Participatory task
Indicative Time on Task 2: 26 hours
Due: Weekly
Weighting: 30%

You will be required to actively participate in weekly online tutorial activities. These will be available on a weekly basis on iLearn.


On successful completion you will be able to:
  • Identify Indigenous Australians' contemporary and historical contributions to knowledge in scientific and community fields.
  • Recognise the diversity of Indigenous knowledges and in fields of science, technology, land and Country.
  • Analyse and reflect on the on-going relationship of Indigenous and non-indigenous knowledges.
  • Communicate effectively, in a range of written and spoken formats, within the conventions of the discipline of Indigenous Studies.

1 If you need help with your assignment, please contact:

  • the academic teaching staff in your unit for guidance in understanding or completing this type of assessment
  • the Learning Skills Unit for academic skills support.

2 Indicative time-on-task is an estimate of the time required for completion of the assessment task and is subject to individual variation

Delivery and Resources

 

Week

Topic

Reading

1

Big History

Christian, D., 2019, "The keen longing for unified, all-embracing knowledge: Big History, Cosmic Evolution, and New Research Agendas. Journal of Big History vol 3 Issue 3.

 

Christian, D. 2011, 'Chapter 8: Intensification and the Origins of Agriculture' in Christian, D. & McNeill, W. [eds] Maps of Time: An Introduction to Big History. University of California Press, California.

 

2

Archaeology

Walshe, K., 2005. Indigenous archaeological sites and the Black Swamp fossil bed: Rocky River precinct, Flinders Chase National Park, Kangaroo Island, South Australia. Australian Archaeology60(1), pp.61-64.

Langton, M., 2018. 'Chapter 2 : Prehistory' in Marcia Langton: Welcome to Country: A Travel Guide to Indigenous Australia. Hardie Grant Publishing.

 

Langton, M., 2018. 'Chapter 3 : Cultures and Languages' in Marcia Langton: Welcome to Country: A Travel Guide to Indigenous Australia. Hardie Grant Publishing.

 

3

Knowledges

Mistry, J. & Berardi, A., 2016, 'Bridging indigenous and scientific knowledge' Insights, vol 352, issue 6291.

Tacon, P.S., 2019. Connecting to the ancestors: Why rock art is important for indigenous Australians and their well-being. Rock Art Research: The Journal of the Australian Rock Art Research Association (AURA) 36, 5.

 

4

Land / Water

Langton, M., 2006. Earth, wind, fire and water: the social and spiritual construction of water in Aboriginal societies. Social Archaeology of Australian Indigenous Societies, The, p.139.

 

O’Brien, L., Watson, I., 2014. In Conversation with Uncle Lewis: Bushfires, weather-makers, collective management. AlterNative: An International Journal of Indigenous Peoples 10, 450–461.

 

5

Sky

Fuller, R., Anderson, M., Norris, R. and Trudgett, M., 2014. The emu sky knowledge of the Kamilaroi and Euahlayi peoples. arXiv preprint arXiv:1403.0304.

Hamacher, D.W., Banks, K., 2018. The Planets in Indigenous Australian Traditions. Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Planetary Science

 

6

MegaFauna

Cobden, R., Clarkson, C., Price, G.J., David, B., Geneste, J.M., Delannoy, J.J., Barker, B., Lamb, L. and Gunn, R.G., 2017. The identification of extinct megafauna in rock art using geometric morphometrics: A Genyornis newtoni painting in Arnhem Land, northern Australia?. Journal of Archaeological Science87, pp.95-107.

 

Walshe, K., 2005. Indigenous Archaeological Sites and the Black Swamp Fossil Bed: Rocky River Precinct, Flinders Chase National Park, Kangaroo Island, South Australia. Australian Archaeology 60, 61–64.

 

7

Food / Medicine

Pascoe, B., 2014, Dark Emu. Magabala Books (online MQ Library)

 

8

Agriculture

Pascoe, B., 2014, Dark Emu. Magabala Books (online MQ Library)

 

Steffensen, V., 2020, Fire Country, Hardie Grant Publishing, Melbourne (online MQ Library)

 

9

Fire

Steffensen, V., 2020, Fire Country, Hardie Grant Publishing, Melbourne

 

10

Global Knowledges

Harris, P., Matamua, R., Smith, T., Kerr, H. and Waaka, T., 2013. A review of Māori astronomy in Aotearoa-New Zealand. Journal of Astronomical History and Heritage16(3), pp.325-336.

 

Echo-Hawk, R.C., 2000. Ancient history in the New World: integrating oral traditions and the archaeological record in deep time. American Antiquity, pp.267-290.

 

11

Climate Change

Birch, A., 2016. Climate change, mining and traditional indigenous knowledge in Australia. Social Inclusion4(1), pp.92-101.

 

Birckhead, J., Greiner, R., Hemming, S., Rigney, D., Rigney, M., Trevorrow, G. and Trevorrow, T., 2011. Economic and cultural values of water to the Ngarrindjeri people of the Lower Lakes, Coorong and Murray Mouth. River Consulting: Townsville.

 

McMillen, H., Ticktin, T. and Springer, H.K., 2017. The future is behind us: traditional ecological knowledge and resilience over time on Hawai ‘i Island. Regional Environmental Change17(2), pp.579-592.

 

12

Continuity

Turnbull, D., 2009. Introduction: futures for Indigenous knowledges. Futures 41, 1–5.

 

 

Policies and Procedures

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central (https://staff.mq.edu.au/work/strategy-planning-and-governance/university-policies-and-procedures/policy-central). Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Students seeking more policy resources can visit the Student Policy Gateway (https://students.mq.edu.au/support/study/student-policy-gateway). It is your one-stop-shop for the key policies you need to know about throughout your undergraduate student journey.

If you would like to see all the policies relevant to Learning and Teaching visit Policy Central (https://staff.mq.edu.au/work/strategy-planning-and-governance/university-policies-and-procedures/policy-central).

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/admin/other-resources/student-conduct

Results

Results published on platform other than eStudent, (eg. iLearn, Coursera etc.) or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent. For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au or if you are a Global MBA student contact globalmba.support@mq.edu.au

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Learning Skills

Learning Skills (mq.edu.au/learningskills) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to help you improve your marks and take control of your study.

The Library provides online and face to face support to help you find and use relevant information resources. 

Student Enquiry Service

For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at ask.mq.edu.au

If you are a Global MBA student contact globalmba.support@mq.edu.au

Equity Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

IT Help

For help with University computer systems and technology, visit http://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/information_technology/help/

When using the University's IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use of IT Resources Policy. The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network including students.

Protocols for Indigenous Studies

In Australia there are two distinct Indigenous peoples: Aboriginal people and Torres Strait Islander people.

When writing about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders do not use the acronym ‘ATSI’, write in full. Capital letters should always be used when referring to Aboriginal peoples and or Torres Strait Islander peoples.

While Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander are acceptable terms to use, it should be recognised that these are collective terms and often used improperly to impose a single identity on the many different communities.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people generally prefer to be known by the language/cultural groups or communities, to which they belong, that is, own names rather than terms such 'the Aboriginals' or 'the Islanders'. For example, Aboriginal people in the area surrounding Macquarie University may refer to themselves as Dharug. It is important that you always check the correct name or terms to use for people in the area/region.

The use of incorrect, inappropriate or dated terminology is to be avoided as it can give offence. Many historical terms or those in common usage some years ago are now not acceptable, including terms such as 'aborigine' ‘native’, ‘savage’ and ‘primitive’. Similarly, do not use the terms ‘half-caste’, ‘part-Aborigine/Aboriginal’ or any reference to skin colour or physical features, as they do not signify that a person is Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander and may cause offence. When quoting from academic or other sources that uses inappropriate, dated terminology or racists language, use (sic) directly after the inappropriate term of phrase, thus calling attention to the fact that it has been sourced from the original and that you understand it to be outdated, inappropriate or problematic in the contemporary context.