Students

TRAN8070 – Introduction to Translation and Interpreting

2021 – Session 1, Weekday attendance, North Ryde

Notice

As part of Phase 3 of our return to campus plan, most units will now run tutorials, seminars and other small group activities on campus, and most will keep an online version available to those students unable to return or those who choose to continue their studies online.

To check the availability of face-to-face and online activities for your unit, please go to timetable viewer. To check detailed information on unit assessments visit your unit's iLearn space or consult your unit convenor.

General Information

Download as PDF
Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff
Marc Orlando
Jan-Louis Kruger
Jing Fang
Della Goswell
Keven Li
Credit points Credit points
10
Prerequisites Prerequisites
Admission to MTransInter or MTransInterMIntRel or MTransInterMAppLingTESOL or MAdvTransInterStud or MTransInter(Adv) or GradDipTransInter or GradCertCommInter or MConfInt or MAccComm
Corequisites Corequisites
Co-badged status Co-badged status
Unit description Unit description

This unit introduces students to various aspects of translation and interpreting theories and their application to translation and interpreting practice. Theories relevant to translation practice are discussed, focusing on linguistic theories, functionalist theories, and discourse-based approaches. The overview of interpreting theory covers equivalence, comprehension, issues relating to language proficiency, and interpreting processes in diverse modes. The various approaches adopted in the unit aim to broaden students' perspectives on translation and interpreting and inform their studies.

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at https://www.mq.edu.au/study/calendar-of-dates

Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of this unit, you will be able to:

  • ULO1: Demonstrate an understanding of the nature and role of theory.
  • ULO2: Demonstrate familiarity with a range of theories relevant to translation and interpreting.
  • ULO3: Reflect on the relevance of translation and interpreting theories.
  • ULO4: Apply theoretical knowledge to translation and interpreting tasks.
  • ULO5: Communicate theoretical concepts orally and in writing to a variety of audiences.

General Assessment Information

For assessment task 1 (to be submitted in week 8), students will choose to use their interpreting or translation practice as basis for the project.

For assessment task 2 (to be submitted in week 14), students will use their translation practice as basis for the essay. The essay and reference list should follow the APA style.

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Hurdle Due
Action research project 50% No Week 8 (May 2)
Problem-solving task 50% No Week 14 (June 9)

Action research project

Assessment Type 1: Project
Indicative Time on Task 2: 40 hours
Due: Week 8 (May 2)
Weighting: 50%

Students are required to identify a problem in their interpreting, devise and implement a strategy based on theories studied, monitor and report on progress. Students are required to submit the assignment in a multimedia video format (6-8 minutes).


On successful completion you will be able to:
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the nature and role of theory.
  • Demonstrate familiarity with a range of theories relevant to translation and interpreting.
  • Reflect on the relevance of translation and interpreting theories.
  • Apply theoretical knowledge to translation and interpreting tasks.
  • Communicate theoretical concepts orally and in writing to a variety of audiences.

Problem-solving task

Assessment Type 1: Practice-based task
Indicative Time on Task 2: 40 hours
Due: Week 14 (June 9)
Weighting: 50%

Students are required to apply 1 or more theories to a practical translation task in an essay format. The word length for the essay assessment is approximately 2,000 words.


On successful completion you will be able to:
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the nature and role of theory.
  • Demonstrate familiarity with a range of theories relevant to translation and interpreting.
  • Reflect on the relevance of translation and interpreting theories.
  • Apply theoretical knowledge to translation and interpreting tasks.
  • Communicate theoretical concepts orally and in writing to a variety of audiences.

1 If you need help with your assignment, please contact:

  • the academic teaching staff in your unit for guidance in understanding or completing this type of assessment
  • the Writing Centre for academic skills support.

2 Indicative time-on-task is an estimate of the time required for completion of the assessment task and is subject to individual variation

Delivery and Resources

Classes will be delivered in a blended mode. Students will cover weekly pre-recorded lectures made available on ilearn and will attend a tutorial where activities will allow them how to discuss and apply the concepts dealt with in the lecture to their translation and interpreting practice.

Weekly readings will be made available on ilearn.

Prescribed textbooks for this unit are:

Munday, Jeremy (2016): Introducing Translation Studies (4th edition), Routledge (New York/London)

Pöchhacker, Franz (2016): Introducing Interpreting Studies  (2nd edition), Routledge (New York, London).

 

Unit Schedule

TRAN8070 / Introduction to Translation and Interpreting Studies– 2021            Weekly schedule and content

 

Week/date

 

Lecture Topic

 

Lecturer

 

Activities and discussion (based on content from chapters from both books)

 

1 (23 Feb)

Introduction to T&I Studies

T&I in the 21st century: Practice, Research, Training

A/Prof Marc Orlando

Chapter 1 from Munday's Introducing Translation Studies

(+ elements from Introducing Interpreting Studies)

Considerations on the history and development of the discipline

2 (2 March)

Early translation theories and approaches

 

Prof Jan-Louis Kruger

Chapter 2 & 3 Munday's Introducing Translation Studies

3 (9 March)

Product and process: T&I and cognition

Prof Jan-Louis Kruger

Chapter 4 from Munday's Introducing Translation Studies (+ elements from Introducing Interpreting Studies)

 

4 (16 March)

Functional Theories

 

Dr Jing Fang

Chapter 5 from Munday's Introducing Translation Studies (+ elements from Introducing Interpreting Studies)

 

5 (23 March)

Discourse and register analysis

 

Dr Jing Fang

Chapter 6 from Munday's Introducing Translation Studies

6 (30 March)

Main theoretical concepts, models, and paradigms in Interpreting Studies

 

A/Prof Marc Orlando

Chapter 2-3 from Pöchhacker's Introducing Interpreting Studies

7 (20 April)

The Interpretive Theory of Translation (Théorie du sens)

 

A/Prof Marc Orlando

Chapter 2-3 from Pöchhacker's Introducing Interpreting Studies

8 (27 April)

Discourse in Interaction

 

Ms Della Goswell

Chapter 3 & 8 from Pöchhacker's Introducing Interpreting Studies

9 (4 May)

Systems theories

 

Dr Long Li

Chapter 7 from Munday's Introducing Translation Studies

10 (11 May)

Cultural and ideological turns

 

Dr Long Li

Chapter 8 from Munday's Introducing Translation Studies

11 (18 May)

Sociological approaches

 

Dr Long Li

Chapter 9 from Munday's Introducing Translation Studies

12 (25 May)

New directions in T&I Studies

 

Dr Long Li

Chapter 11 from Munday's Introducing Translation Studies

(+ elements from Introducing Interpreting Studies)

 

13 (1 June)

Wrap-up and future work

A/Prof Marc Orlando

Conducting research in T&I studies

 

Policies and Procedures

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central (https://policies.mq.edu.au). Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Students seeking more policy resources can visit Student Policies (https://students.mq.edu.au/support/study/policies). It is your one-stop-shop for the key policies you need to know about throughout your undergraduate student journey.

To find other policies relating to Teaching and Learning, visit Policy Central (https://policies.mq.edu.au) and use the search tool.

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/admin/other-resources/student-conduct

Results

Results published on platform other than eStudent, (eg. iLearn, Coursera etc.) or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent. For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au or if you are a Global MBA student contact globalmba.support@mq.edu.au

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Learning Skills

Learning Skills (mq.edu.au/learningskills) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to help you improve your marks and take control of your study.

The Library provides online and face to face support to help you find and use relevant information resources. 

Student Services and Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

Student Enquiries

For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at ask.mq.edu.au

If you are a Global MBA student contact globalmba.support@mq.edu.au

IT Help

For help with University computer systems and technology, visit http://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/information_technology/help/

When using the University's IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use of IT Resources Policy. The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network including students.