Students

MMCC7001 – Studies in Network Culture

2021 – Session 2, Fully online/virtual

Session 2 Learning and Teaching Update

The decision has been made to conduct study online for the remainder of Session 2 for all units WITHOUT mandatory on-campus learning activities. Exams for Session 2 will also be online where possible to do so.

This is due to the extension of the lockdown orders and to provide certainty around arrangements for the remainder of Session 2. We hope to return to campus beyond Session 2 as soon as it is safe and appropriate to do so.

Some classes/teaching activities cannot be moved online and must be taught on campus. You should already know if you are in one of these classes/teaching activities and your unit convenor will provide you with more information via iLearn. If you want to confirm, see the list of units with mandatory on-campus classes/teaching activities.

Visit the MQ COVID-19 information page for more detail.

General Information

Download as PDF
Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff
John Potts
Contact via 9850 2163
10HA 165J
Thursday 10 - 12
Stefan Solomon
Credit points Credit points
10
Prerequisites Prerequisites
Admission to MRes
Corequisites Corequisites
Co-badged status Co-badged status
Unit description Unit description
Studies in Network Culture focuses on the social and cultural impact of the Internet and digital media. Issues addressed include digital disruption; online networks and democracy; mobile phone network culture; the transformation of media culture, including screen culture, by streaming technologies; downloading and remix culture; issues of authorship and copyright; ‘transformative’ online practices such as fan fiction.

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at https://www.mq.edu.au/study/calendar-of-dates

Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of this unit, you will be able to:

  • ULO1: deploy advanced disciplinary knowledge of the principles, methods and concepts within the field of network culture.
  • ULO2: identify, analyse and evaluate key issues and debates related to transformative online practices.
  • ULO3: apply and critically assess research practices that address the social and cultural impact of digital media.
  • ULO4: communicate effectively and incorporate academic conventions.

General Assessment Information

Please note that the University and the Faculty of Arts have launched a new assessment policy effective as of 1 July 2021. This new policy particularly affects LATE SUBMISSION OF ASSIGNMENTS

The Faculty policy in relation to late assessment submissions is as follows: 

Unless a Special Consideration request has been submitted and approved, (a) a penalty for lateness will apply – 10 marks out of 100 credit will be deducted per day for assignments submitted after the due date – and (b) no assignment will be accepted seven days (incl. weekends) after the original submission deadline. No late submissions will be accepted for timed assessments – e.g. quizzes, online tests, etc. 

To be very clear:

    • Unless you have applied for special consideration and had your application approved, for each day your assignment is late, 10 marks will be deducted. For example, if you submit your assignment 7 days late, 70 marks will be deducted, which means you will fail that assignment.
    • If your assignment is more than 7 days late (including weekends), you will get 0 for your assignment.

These are serious penalties that will substantially alter your final grade and even determine whether you pass or fail this unit. Please make every effort to submit your assignment by the due date.

If you find you cannot submit your assignment on time, please apply for Special Consideration through AskMQ. Make sure you read Macquarie University's policy regarding Special Consideration requests before you apply: 

https://students.mq.edu.au/study/assessment-exams/special-consideration

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Hurdle Due
Seminar Presentation 20% No Weeks 11 & 12
Minor Essay 30% No 23:59 27/9/21
Major Essay 50% No 23:59 11/11/21

Seminar Presentation

Assessment Type 1: Presentation
Indicative Time on Task 2: 15 hours
Due: Weeks 11 & 12
Weighting: 20%

 

Students will be required to present a specific perspective on network culture both as cultural and academic practice. Refer to iLearn for further information.

 


On successful completion you will be able to:
  • deploy advanced disciplinary knowledge of the principles, methods and concepts within the field of network culture.
  • identify, analyse and evaluate key issues and debates related to transformative online practices.
  • apply and critically assess research practices that address the social and cultural impact of digital media.
  • communicate effectively and incorporate academic conventions.

Minor Essay

Assessment Type 1: Essay
Indicative Time on Task 2: 25 hours
Due: 23:59 27/9/21
Weighting: 30%

 

This essay requires students to critically identify, analyse and research a key aspect of academic approaches to the study of network cultures. Refer to iLearn for further information.

 


On successful completion you will be able to:
  • deploy advanced disciplinary knowledge of the principles, methods and concepts within the field of network culture.
  • identify, analyse and evaluate key issues and debates related to transformative online practices.
  • apply and critically assess research practices that address the social and cultural impact of digital media.
  • communicate effectively and incorporate academic conventions.

Major Essay

Assessment Type 1: Essay
Indicative Time on Task 2: 46 hours
Due: 23:59 11/11/21
Weighting: 50%

 

This essay requires students to critically reflect, undertake independent research and evaluate key approaches in network culture studies. Refer to iLearn for further information.

 


On successful completion you will be able to:
  • deploy advanced disciplinary knowledge of the principles, methods and concepts within the field of network culture.
  • identify, analyse and evaluate key issues and debates related to transformative online practices.
  • apply and critically assess research practices that address the social and cultural impact of digital media.
  • communicate effectively and incorporate academic conventions.

1 If you need help with your assignment, please contact:

  • the academic teaching staff in your unit for guidance in understanding or completing this type of assessment
  • the Learning Skills Unit for academic skills support.

2 Indicative time-on-task is an estimate of the time required for completion of the assessment task and is subject to individual variation

Delivery and Resources

Readings for the unit will be provided or made available on iLearn. Essays are to be submitted via Turnitin.

Unit Schedule

SEMINAR SCHEDULE

WEEK 2: INTRODUCTION: INTERNET HISTORY AND NETWORK THEORY

5 August

 

WEEK 3: WHAT IS THE AUTHOR?/ HISTORY OF THE AUTHOR

12 August

Michel Foucault, 'What Is an Author?' (1969)

Martha Woodmansee, 'On the Author Effect: Recovering Collectivity' (1994)

Aaron Meskin, 'Authorship' (2008) in Livingston and Plantinga (eds) The Routledge Companion toPhilosophy and Film, London: Routledge, 2008

Andrew Bennett, 'Authority, Ownership, Originality' in The Author(2005)

 

WEEK 4: THE NEAR-DEATH OF THE AUTHOR: POST-STRUCTURALISM, POSTMODERNISM & NETWORK CULTURE

19 August

Roland Barthes, 'The Death of the Author' (1969)

Andrew Murphie & John Potts, 'Digital Aesthetics: Cultural Effects of New Media Technologies' in Culture and Technology(2003)

William Deresiewicz, Chapter 10 in The Death of the Artist(2020)

Jonathan Taplin, ‘Pirates of the Internet’ in Move Fast and Break Things (2017)

 

WEEK 5: COPYRIGHT, TECHNOLOGY, DOWNLOADING & STREAMING

26 August

Cory Doctorow, 'How Copyright Broke' (2008)

Steve Collins, 'Kookaburra v. Down Under: It's Just Overkill' in Scan Journal Vol 7 No 1 2010

J. Smiers and M. Van Schijndel, 'A Level Cultural Playing Field' (2009)

Linda Jaivin, 'Big Content' in Phillipa McGuinness (ed) Copyfight(2015)

 

WEEK 6: FAN FICTION, BIG DATA, AI AND OTHER AUTHORSHIP CHALLENGES

2 September

Rebecca Tushnet, 'Architecture and Morality: Transformative Works, Transforming Fans'

in Darling and Pezanowski(eds) Creativity Without Law: Challenging the Assumptions of

Intellectual Property(2017)

Hannah Fry, 'Good artists borrow; great artists steal', from Hello World: Being Human in the Age of Algorithms (2018)

Rodley, Chris and Burrell, Andrew, 'On the Art of Writing with Data' in Potts, John (ed) The Future of Writing (2014) pp. 77 - 89, available as chapter download from library

 

WEEK 7: MEDIA INFRASTRUCTURES (Stefan Solomon)

9 September

 

This week we will focus on the material dimensions of networks, which are often overlooked in debates about digital technology. By considering the ways that electronic signals travel via a series of mobile towers, data centres, and undersea cables, we are able to gain a different, more physically-grounded perspective on modes of communication that can otherwise seem to be immaterial in nature.

 

Starosielski, N. (2015). ‘Fixed Flow: Undersea Cables as Media Infrastructure’. In L. Parks and N. Starosielski (Eds.), Signal Traffic: Critical Studies of Media Infrastructures (pp. 53-70). University of Illinois Press.

 

MID-SEMESTER BREAK

 

 WEEK 8: STREAMING CULTURES

30 September

 

In this seminar, we will think critically about a particular kind of digital form that many of us use on a daily basis: streaming technology. In particular, we will think about the rise of Netflix as a ubiquitous platform that has redefined our notions of television, and we will spend some time discussing the various social and environmental impacts of streaming as a mode of media delivery.

 

Lobato, R. (2019). Introduction. In R. Lobato, Netflix Nations: The Geography of Digital Distribution (pp. 1-17). New York University Press.

 

Lobato, R. (2019). What is Netflix? In R. Lobato, Netflix Nations: The Geography of Digital Distribution (pp. 18-45). New York University Press.

 

 

WEEK 9: COGNITIVE MAPPING

7 October

 

Is it possible to actually 'see' the mode of production under which we live? How might artists try to represent capitalism as a totality that is beyond human perception? This week we look at the concept of 'cognitive mapping,' an aesthetic approach that was coined by Fredric Jameson in the 1980s in response to the rise of neoliberalism. Examining this idea, we will consider its evolution (or failure) over the last three decades, with reference to examples from photography and cinema.

 

Toscano, A. and Kinkle, J. (2015). Introduction: The Limits of the Known Universe, or, Cognitive Mapping Revisited. In A. Toscano and J. Kinkle, Cartographies of the Absolute (pp. 11-27). Zero Books.

 

 

WEEK 10: BLOCKCHAIN AND BITCOIN

14 October

 

We follow last week's seminar on cognitive mapping by addressing a pair of significant contemporary concepts: 'blockchain' and 'bitcoin.' In the last decade, blockchain and bitcoin (alongside many other cryptocurrencies) have emerged in response to the need for secure, decentralised, peer-to-peer networks for recording transactions. What implications might such networks have for us beyond their immediate financial concerns?

 

Ferguson, F. (2019) ‘Bitcoin: A Reader’s Guide (The Beauty of the Very Idea)’. Critical Inquiry 46(1), 140-166. https://doi.org/10.1086/705302

 

 

WEEKS 11 - 13: STUDENT SEMINAR PRESENTATIONS

 

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Bennett, Andrew, The Author, London: Routledge, 2005

Bently, L., Davis, J. and Ginsburg, J (eds) Copyright and Piracy, Cambridge:

Cambridge University Press, 2010

Bettig, Ronald V., Copyrighting Culture: The Political Economy of Intellectual Property,

Boulder: Westview, 1996

Borschke, Margie, This Is Not a Remix: Piracy, Authenticity and Popular Music, New York: Bloomsbury, 2017

Burke, Sean (ed) Authorship From Plato to the Postmodern: A Reader, Edinburgh:

Edinburgh University Press, 2000

Burke, Sean, The Death and Return of the Author, Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2010

Darling, Kate and Pezanowski, Aaron (eds) Creativity Without Law: Challenging the Assumptions of Intellectual Property, New York: New York University Press, 2017

Demers, Joanna, Steal this Music: How Intellectual Property Law Affects Musical

Creativity, Athens: University of Georgia Press, 2006

Deresiewicz, William, The Death of the Artist, New York: Henry Holt, 2020

Doctorow, Cory, Content:Selected Essays on Technology, Creativity, Copyright and the Future of the Future, San Francisco: Tachyon Publications, 2008

Fry, Hannah, Hello World: Being Human in the Age of Algorithms, New York: W W Norton, 2018

Lessig, Lawrence, Free Culture: How Big Media Uses Technology and the Law to Lock

Down Culture and Control Creativity, New York: Penguin, 2004

Lobato, R.,  Netflix Nations: The Geography of Digital Distribution, New York University Press, 2019

McGuinness, Phillipa (ed)Copyfight, Sydney: NewSouth, 2015

Murphie, Andrew and Potts, John, Culture and Technology, Basingstoke: Palgrave

Macmillan, 2003

Postigo, Hector, The Digital Rights Movement, Cambridge: MIT Press, 2012

Potts, John (ed) The Future of Writing, Basingstoke: Palgrave Pivot, 2014

Reagle, Joseph and Koerner, Jackie (eds) Wikipedia @ 20: Stories of an Incomplete Revolution, Cambridge: MIT Press, 2020

Rose, Mark, Authors and Owners: The Invention of Copyright, Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1993

Simone, Daniela, Copyright and Collective Authorship, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2019

Smiers, J. and Van Schijndel, M., Imagine There is No Copyright and No Cultural Conglomerates Too...,Amsterdam: Institute of Network Cultures, 2009

Taplin, Jonathan, Move Fast and Break Things: How Facebook, Google and Amazon Have

Cornered Culture and What it Means For Us, New York: Macmillan, 2017

Woodmansee, Martha and Jaszi, Peter (eds) The Construction of Authorship, Durham:

Duke University Press, 1994

Zwar, Jan, Throsby, David, Longden, Thomas, Australian Authors: Industry Brief No. 1: Key

Findings, 2015,Department of Economics, Macquarie University at http://goto.mq.edu.au/book-industry

Zuboff, Shoshana, The Age of Surveillance Capitalism: The Fight for a Human Future at the New Frontier of Power, New York: Public Affairs, 2019

Policies and Procedures

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central (https://policies.mq.edu.au). Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Students seeking more policy resources can visit Student Policies (https://students.mq.edu.au/support/study/policies). It is your one-stop-shop for the key policies you need to know about throughout your undergraduate student journey.

To find other policies relating to Teaching and Learning, visit Policy Central (https://policies.mq.edu.au) and use the search tool.

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/admin/other-resources/student-conduct

Results

Results published on platform other than eStudent, (eg. iLearn, Coursera etc.) or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent. For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au or if you are a Global MBA student contact globalmba.support@mq.edu.au

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Learning Skills

Learning Skills (mq.edu.au/learningskills) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to help you improve your marks and take control of your study.

The Library provides online and face to face support to help you find and use relevant information resources. 

Student Enquiry Service

For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at ask.mq.edu.au

If you are a Global MBA student contact globalmba.support@mq.edu.au

Equity Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

IT Help

For help with University computer systems and technology, visit http://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/information_technology/help/

When using the University's IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use of IT Resources Policy. The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network including students.