Students

PHIL3057 – Theories of Justice

2021 – Session 2, Fully online/virtual

Session 2 Learning and Teaching Update

The decision has been made to conduct study online for the remainder of Session 2 for all units WITHOUT mandatory on-campus learning activities. Exams for Session 2 will also be online where possible to do so.

This is due to the extension of the lockdown orders and to provide certainty around arrangements for the remainder of Session 2. We hope to return to campus beyond Session 2 as soon as it is safe and appropriate to do so.

Some classes/teaching activities cannot be moved online and must be taught on campus. You should already know if you are in one of these classes/teaching activities and your unit convenor will provide you with more information via iLearn. If you want to confirm, see the list of units with mandatory on-campus classes/teaching activities.

Visit the MQ COVID-19 information page for more detail.

General Information

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Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit Convenor
A/Prof Paul Formosa
Lecturer
Prof Jean-Philippe Deranty
Credit points Credit points
10
Prerequisites Prerequisites
130cp at 1000 level or above
Corequisites Corequisites
Co-badged status Co-badged status
Unit description Unit description

What is justice? What is fairness? This unit explores these important questions by examining leading philosophical theories of justice, including John Rawls's influential model, as well as the main political approaches that are associated with them, such as liberalism, libertarianism, republicanism, and socialism. We assess the capacity of these theories and approaches to respond to pressing social justice issues. We focus on issues of inequality and diversity in society by asking: what degree of inequality, if any, can be justified? We also examine broader questions around social and retributive justice, such as: How can we justify punishing those who violate justice? What are the obligations of democratic citizenship? Is our society and its political institutions racist, sexist, or unfairly biased against cultural minorities? What do we owe the poor in other countries? And is our treatment of animals and the environment a matter of justice?

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at https://students.mq.edu.au/important-dates

Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of this unit, you will be able to:

  • ULO1: understand some of the major theories and current debates in contemporary political philosophy
  • ULO2: analyse arguments in the relevant literature
  • ULO3: evaluate relevant theories and arguments critically
  • ULO4: communicate clearly your own perspective on the views and arguments presented in the unit

General Assessment Information

Unless a Special Consideration request has been submitted and approved, (a) a penalty for lateness will apply – 10 marks out of 100 credit will be deducted per day for assignments submitted after the due date – and (b) no assignment will be accepted seven days (incl. weekends) after the original submission deadline.

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Hurdle Due
Quizzes 20% No 5/11/2021
Philosophical essay 40% No 4/11/2021
Reflective tasks 20% No 9/9/2021
Participation 20% No ongoing

Quizzes

Assessment Type 1: Quiz/Test
Indicative Time on Task 2: 15 hours
Due: 5/11/2021
Weighting: 20%

 

Online quizzes

 


On successful completion you will be able to:
  • understand some of the major theories and current debates in contemporary political philosophy

Philosophical essay

Assessment Type 1: Essay
Indicative Time on Task 2: 30 hours
Due: 4/11/2021
Weighting: 40%

 

Philosophical essay

 


On successful completion you will be able to:
  • understand some of the major theories and current debates in contemporary political philosophy
  • analyse arguments in the relevant literature
  • evaluate relevant theories and arguments critically
  • communicate clearly your own perspective on the views and arguments presented in the unit

Reflective tasks

Assessment Type 1: Reflective Writing
Indicative Time on Task 2: 15 hours
Due: 9/9/2021
Weighting: 20%

 

Reflective tasks

 


On successful completion you will be able to:
  • understand some of the major theories and current debates in contemporary political philosophy
  • analyse arguments in the relevant literature
  • evaluate relevant theories and arguments critically
  • communicate clearly your own perspective on the views and arguments presented in the unit

Participation

Assessment Type 1: Participatory task
Indicative Time on Task 2: 15 hours
Due: ongoing
Weighting: 20%

 

Participate in relevant online forum or in-class tutorial discussions and activities. Students are expected to be well-prepared and make a constructive contribution.

 


On successful completion you will be able to:
  • understand some of the major theories and current debates in contemporary political philosophy
  • analyse arguments in the relevant literature
  • evaluate relevant theories and arguments critically
  • communicate clearly your own perspective on the views and arguments presented in the unit

1 If you need help with your assignment, please contact:

  • the academic teaching staff in your unit for guidance in understanding or completing this type of assessment
  • the Learning Skills Unit for academic skills support.

2 Indicative time-on-task is an estimate of the time required for completion of the assessment task and is subject to individual variation

Delivery and Resources

Required readings are listed in iLearn and available for download from Leganto. You must read the required readings BEFORE the lecture and tutorial.

Unit Schedule

PHIL3057 – 2021 – Weekly schedule

 

Week 1 (PF)

Lecture 1: Introduction: Equality and Diversity

 

No tutorial and no required reading this week

 

Week 2 (PF)

Lecture 2 & Tutorial 1: Rawls and Liberalism

 

Reflective Task assessment handed out in Week 2.

 

Quizzes start week 2

 

Week 3 (PF)

Lecture 3 and Tutorial 2: Dworkin and Luck Equalitarianism

 

Week 4 (PF)

Lecture 4 & Tutorial 3: Nozick and Libertarianism

 

Week 5 (JPD)

Lecture 5 & Tutorial 4: Socialism

 

Week 6 (JPD)

Lecture 6 & Tutorial 5: Republicanism

 

Week 7 (PF)

Lecture 7 & Tutorial 6: Retributive Justice, Criminality and Punishment

 

Reflective Task assessment due this week

 

RECESS

 

Week 8 (PF)

Lecture 8 & Tutorial 7: Feminism, Liberalism and Justice

 

Philosophical Essay Assessment questions handed out in week 8

 

Week 9 (JPD)

Lecture 9 & Tutorial 8: Democracy and Minorities

 

Week 10 (JPD)

Lecture 10 & Tutorial 9: Global Justice

 

Week 11 (JPD)

Lecture 11 & Tutorial 10: Animal Justice

 

Week 12 (JPD)

Lecture 12: Environmental Justice

 

No tutorial or quizzes this week

 

Week 13

No Lectures or Tutorials this week - Writing Week

 

Essays due this week. Quizzes close this week

Policies and Procedures

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central (https://staff.mq.edu.au/work/strategy-planning-and-governance/university-policies-and-procedures/policy-central). Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Students seeking more policy resources can visit the Student Policy Gateway (https://students.mq.edu.au/support/study/student-policy-gateway). It is your one-stop-shop for the key policies you need to know about throughout your undergraduate student journey.

If you would like to see all the policies relevant to Learning and Teaching visit Policy Central (https://staff.mq.edu.au/work/strategy-planning-and-governance/university-policies-and-procedures/policy-central).

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/admin/other-resources/student-conduct

Results

Results published on platform other than eStudent, (eg. iLearn, Coursera etc.) or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent. For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au or if you are a Global MBA student contact globalmba.support@mq.edu.au

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Learning Skills

Learning Skills (mq.edu.au/learningskills) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to help you improve your marks and take control of your study.

The Library provides online and face to face support to help you find and use relevant information resources. 

Student Enquiry Service

For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at ask.mq.edu.au

If you are a Global MBA student contact globalmba.support@mq.edu.au

Equity Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

IT Help

For help with University computer systems and technology, visit http://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/information_technology/help/

When using the University's IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use of IT Resources Policy. The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network including students.