Students

SOCI2010 – Theorising Societies

2021 – Session 1, Fully online/virtual

Notice

As part of Phase 3 of our return to campus plan, most units will now run tutorials, seminars and other small group activities on campus, and most will keep an online version available to those students unable to return or those who choose to continue their studies online.

To check the availability of face-to-face and online activities for your unit, please go to timetable viewer. To check detailed information on unit assessments visit your unit's iLearn space or consult your unit convenor.

General Information

Download as PDF
Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff
Credit points Credit points
10
Prerequisites Prerequisites
40cp at 1000 level or above
Corequisites Corequisites
Co-badged status Co-badged status
Unit description Unit description

Sociological theorising is about understanding and explaining the meaning of social phenomena. Usually that evolves drawing on existing concepts, or constructing our own, as prisms through which we interpret the range of human actions, behaviours and attitudes. In this unit we will discuss the role of sociological theory today. We will explore how major social thinkers have attempted to understand and explain social change, especially in the context of the deep uncertainties that characterise modernity. We will discuss original texts by Marx, Weber, Durkheim, Simmel and other more recent theorists whose works are examples of ‘the sociological imagination’ and its usefulness to thinking about social change.

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at https://www.mq.edu.au/study/calendar-of-dates

Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of this unit, you will be able to:

  • ULO1: identify the distinguishing figures, topics and texts of Social Theory and Sociology as a field of study and investigate its points of connection and disconnection in contemporary society
  • ULO2: explain the origin, characteristics and complexity of modern societies.
  • ULO3: articulate a coherent, developed account of what it means to live in modern societies.
  • ULO4: analyse and critically assess a variety of primary texts within their historical, social and discursive contexts.

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Hurdle Due
Seminar Participation 20% No Ongoing
Short Essay 30% No Week 7
Essay 2 50% No Week 13

Seminar Participation

Assessment Type 1: Participatory task
Indicative Time on Task 2: 25 hours
Due: Ongoing
Weighting: 20%

 

Active engagement with original theoretical texts by way of close reading and peer discussion.

 


On successful completion you will be able to:
  • identify the distinguishing figures, topics and texts of Social Theory and Sociology as a field of study and investigate its points of connection and disconnection in contemporary society
  • explain the origin, characteristics and complexity of modern societies.
  • articulate a coherent, developed account of what it means to live in modern societies.
  • analyse and critically assess a variety of primary texts within their historical, social and discursive contexts.

Short Essay

Assessment Type 1: Essay
Indicative Time on Task 2: 35 hours
Due: Week 7
Weighting: 30%

 

This essay will give students the opportunity to show and build on their comprehension of key concepts in social theory.

 


On successful completion you will be able to:
  • identify the distinguishing figures, topics and texts of Social Theory and Sociology as a field of study and investigate its points of connection and disconnection in contemporary society
  • explain the origin, characteristics and complexity of modern societies.
  • articulate a coherent, developed account of what it means to live in modern societies.
  • analyse and critically assess a variety of primary texts within their historical, social and discursive contexts.

Essay 2

Assessment Type 1: Essay
Indicative Time on Task 2: 40 hours
Due: Week 13
Weighting: 50%

 

This research essay aims to give students the opportunity to show their comprehension of the material covered in the unit by way of a standard essay (Introduction, body, conclusion).

 


On successful completion you will be able to:
  • identify the distinguishing figures, topics and texts of Social Theory and Sociology as a field of study and investigate its points of connection and disconnection in contemporary society
  • explain the origin, characteristics and complexity of modern societies.
  • articulate a coherent, developed account of what it means to live in modern societies.
  • analyse and critically assess a variety of primary texts within their historical, social and discursive contexts.

1 If you need help with your assignment, please contact:

  • the academic teaching staff in your unit for guidance in understanding or completing this type of assessment
  • the Writing Centre for academic skills support.

2 Indicative time-on-task is an estimate of the time required for completion of the assessment task and is subject to individual variation

Delivery and Resources

Lectures and tutorials

Policies and Procedures

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central (https://policies.mq.edu.au). Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Students seeking more policy resources can visit Student Policies (https://students.mq.edu.au/support/study/policies). It is your one-stop-shop for the key policies you need to know about throughout your undergraduate student journey.

To find other policies relating to Teaching and Learning, visit Policy Central (https://policies.mq.edu.au) and use the search tool.

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/admin/other-resources/student-conduct

Results

Results published on platform other than eStudent, (eg. iLearn, Coursera etc.) or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent. For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au or if you are a Global MBA student contact globalmba.support@mq.edu.au

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Learning Skills

Learning Skills (mq.edu.au/learningskills) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to help you improve your marks and take control of your study.

The Library provides online and face to face support to help you find and use relevant information resources. 

Student Services and Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

Student Enquiries

For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at ask.mq.edu.au

If you are a Global MBA student contact globalmba.support@mq.edu.au

IT Help

For help with University computer systems and technology, visit http://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/information_technology/help/

When using the University's IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use of IT Resources Policy. The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network including students.