Students

ANTH2024 – Mad, Bad, Sad: Cross Cultural Perspectives

2021 – Session 1, Special circumstances, North Ryde

Notice

As part of Phase 3 of our return to campus plan, most units will now run tutorials, seminars and other small group activities on campus, and most will keep an online version available to those students unable to return or those who choose to continue their studies online.

To check the availability of face-to-face and online activities for your unit, please go to timetable viewer. To check detailed information on unit assessments visit your unit's iLearn space or consult your unit convenor.

General Information

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Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff
Payel Ray
Credit points Credit points
10
Prerequisites Prerequisites
(ANTH150 or ANTH1050) or 40cp at 1000 level or above
Corequisites Corequisites
Co-badged status Co-badged status
Unit description Unit description
How do cultures in different parts of the world determine and understand who is mad, bad or sad? Madness, deviance and other forms of social difference are cultural constructs that vary considerably across both historical period and cultural context. Moreover, these ideas have profound moral implications that become dramatically entwined with people's lived experience, as well as broader socio-political structures. We examine the cultural and social construction of normality, with a focus on what happens when people find themselves outside these bounds. We will explore comparative perspectives on social structures and individual experiences and meaning, examining themes such as 'sanity', mental illness and culture, melancholy and depression, emotions, sexuality, gender norms, and their transgressions. Throughout, we will focus on the social processes of labeling, representation, medicalisation, and stigmatisation associated with these experiences. Ultimately, students will come to understand how difference is constructed and embodied, and become aware of how deviance is surveilled, managed, and constrained in a variety of cultural contexts.

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at https://students.mq.edu.au/important-dates

Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of this unit, you will be able to:

  • ULO1: Demonstrate command of anthropological knowledge and theories related to normality, abnormality, and how social difference is constructed and managed within particular social, cultural, political, and environmental contexts.
  • ULO2: Analyse comparative ethnographic perspectives on themes related to culture and madness, disorder, deviance, addictions, and mental health.
  • ULO3: Identify and analyse the social and cultural factors that make madness a powerful metaphor and site of surveillance within societies.
  • ULO4: Apply critical analytic skills to discover how desire and deviance transcend individual bodies and are incited, monitored and regulated within the social body and the body politic.
  • ULO5: Demonstrate an ability to analyse and interpret the significance and impact of medicalisation, labelling and stigmatisation.
  • ULO6: Analyse and interpret assumptions about other cultures and cultural differences and what is considered ‘natural’ or ‘normal’ human experience.
  • ULO7: Demonstrate an ability to analyse the cultural construction of abnormality and difference within public representations of culture, madness and deviance.

General Assessment Information

All assignments are to be submitted through iLearn.   

Late submissions: An essay may be submitted up to 7 days late at a penalty of -2% per day.  No submissions will be accepted after this point without an approved special consideration request. 

Missed quizzes: Quizzes will not be re-opened without an approved special consideration request. 

Special consideration requests:  For information about how to apply for special consideration, please click here.

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Hurdle Due
Take-home exam 30% No 3/5/21
Final Online Quiz 25% No 3-4/6/21
Tutorial Participation 20% No Ongoing from Week 2
Midterm Quiz (online) 25% No 1-2/4/21

Take-home exam

Assessment Type 1: Quiz/Test
Indicative Time on Task 2: 21 hours
Due: 3/5/21
Weighting: 30%

Take-home written exam


On successful completion you will be able to:
  • Demonstrate command of anthropological knowledge and theories related to normality, abnormality, and how social difference is constructed and managed within particular social, cultural, political, and environmental contexts.
  • Identify and analyse the social and cultural factors that make madness a powerful metaphor and site of surveillance within societies.
  • Apply critical analytic skills to discover how desire and deviance transcend individual bodies and are incited, monitored and regulated within the social body and the body politic.
  • Demonstrate an ability to analyse and interpret the significance and impact of medicalisation, labelling and stigmatisation.
  • Analyse and interpret assumptions about other cultures and cultural differences and what is considered ‘natural’ or ‘normal’ human experience.
  • Demonstrate an ability to analyse the cultural construction of abnormality and difference within public representations of culture, madness and deviance.

Final Online Quiz

Assessment Type 1: Quiz/Test
Indicative Time on Task 2: 10 hours
Due: 3-4/6/21
Weighting: 25%

A final quiz (multiple choice and/or short answer) that will be completed online.


On successful completion you will be able to:
  • Demonstrate command of anthropological knowledge and theories related to normality, abnormality, and how social difference is constructed and managed within particular social, cultural, political, and environmental contexts.
  • Identify and analyse the social and cultural factors that make madness a powerful metaphor and site of surveillance within societies.
  • Apply critical analytic skills to discover how desire and deviance transcend individual bodies and are incited, monitored and regulated within the social body and the body politic.
  • Demonstrate an ability to analyse and interpret the significance and impact of medicalisation, labelling and stigmatisation.

Tutorial Participation

Assessment Type 1: Participatory task
Indicative Time on Task 2: 24 hours
Due: Ongoing from Week 2
Weighting: 20%

Active attendance and engagement with lecture and tutorial materials for on campus students in class. Active attendance and engagement with lecture and tutorial materials via the discussion forums in iLearn for online students.


On successful completion you will be able to:
  • Analyse comparative ethnographic perspectives on themes related to culture and madness, disorder, deviance, addictions, and mental health.
  • Identify and analyse the social and cultural factors that make madness a powerful metaphor and site of surveillance within societies.
  • Demonstrate an ability to analyse and interpret the significance and impact of medicalisation, labelling and stigmatisation.
  • Analyse and interpret assumptions about other cultures and cultural differences and what is considered ‘natural’ or ‘normal’ human experience.
  • Demonstrate an ability to analyse the cultural construction of abnormality and difference within public representations of culture, madness and deviance.

Midterm Quiz (online)

Assessment Type 1: Quiz/Test
Indicative Time on Task 2: 10 hours
Due: 1-2/4/21
Weighting: 25%

A quiz (multiple choice and/or short answer) that will be completed online.


On successful completion you will be able to:
  • Demonstrate command of anthropological knowledge and theories related to normality, abnormality, and how social difference is constructed and managed within particular social, cultural, political, and environmental contexts.
  • Identify and analyse the social and cultural factors that make madness a powerful metaphor and site of surveillance within societies.
  • Apply critical analytic skills to discover how desire and deviance transcend individual bodies and are incited, monitored and regulated within the social body and the body politic.
  • Demonstrate an ability to analyse and interpret the significance and impact of medicalisation, labelling and stigmatisation.

1 If you need help with your assignment, please contact:

  • the academic teaching staff in your unit for guidance in understanding or completing this type of assessment
  • the Learning Skills Unit for academic skills support.

2 Indicative time-on-task is an estimate of the time required for completion of the assessment task and is subject to individual variation

Delivery and Resources

All resources required to complete this course are available through the iLearn page.  Required readings can be found through Leganto and instructions for completing assignments are under the 'Assignments' topic tab on iLearn. Access to a stable internet connection is required for completion of assignments and quizzes in this unit.

 

Policies and Procedures

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central (https://staff.mq.edu.au/work/strategy-planning-and-governance/university-policies-and-procedures/policy-central). Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Students seeking more policy resources can visit the Student Policy Gateway (https://students.mq.edu.au/support/study/student-policy-gateway). It is your one-stop-shop for the key policies you need to know about throughout your undergraduate student journey.

If you would like to see all the policies relevant to Learning and Teaching visit Policy Central (https://staff.mq.edu.au/work/strategy-planning-and-governance/university-policies-and-procedures/policy-central).

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/admin/other-resources/student-conduct

Results

Results published on platform other than eStudent, (eg. iLearn, Coursera etc.) or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent. For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au or if you are a Global MBA student contact globalmba.support@mq.edu.au

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Learning Skills

Learning Skills (mq.edu.au/learningskills) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to help you improve your marks and take control of your study.

The Library provides online and face to face support to help you find and use relevant information resources. 

Student Enquiry Service

For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at ask.mq.edu.au

If you are a Global MBA student contact globalmba.support@mq.edu.au

Equity Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

IT Help

For help with University computer systems and technology, visit http://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/information_technology/help/

When using the University's IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use of IT Resources Policy. The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network including students.