Students

AHIS7000 – Advanced Studies in Ancient History

2021 – Session 1, Special circumstances, North Ryde

Notice

As part of Phase 3 of our return to campus plan, most units will now run tutorials, seminars and other small group activities on campus, and most will keep an online version available to those students unable to return or those who choose to continue their studies online.

To check the availability of face-to-face and online activities for your unit, please go to timetable viewer. To check detailed information on unit assessments visit your unit's iLearn space or consult your unit convenor.

General Information

Download as PDF
Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff
Paul McKechnie
Leigh Boucher
Credit points Credit points
10
Prerequisites Prerequisites
Admission to MRes
Corequisites Corequisites
Co-badged status Co-badged status
Unit description Unit description

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at https://students.mq.edu.au/important-dates

Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of this unit, you will be able to:

  • ULO1: Apply and assimilate information in a context and at a level appropriate to BPhil level study.
  • ULO2: Assess relevant sources and issues critically, analytically, and in an integrated fashion.
  • ULO3: Demonstrate understanding orally and in writing, by deduction and argumentation.
  • ULO4: Show, orally and in writing, critical understanding of factual questions and judgements of likelihood and value.
  • ULO5: Relate understanding of the ancient world to broad conceptual frameworks and modern contexts.
  • ULO6: Interpret, understand, and advance the state of thinking about the writing of history, including ancient history, and, when appropriate, read against the sources.

General Assessment Information

Please submit your assignments on time.

If you can't, please apply for special consideration (Disruption to Studies) via the system. A medical certificate or equivalent will be required. DON'T ask me (the unit coordinator) for an extension: I'm not allowed to give them.

'Unless a Disruption to Studies request has been submitted and approved, (a) a penalty for lateness will apply--2 marks (out of a total of 100 marks) will be deducted per day for assignment submitted after the due date--and (b) no assignment will be accepted seven days (incl. weekends) after the original submission deadline.'

This is an official wording. The interpretation of the bit about '2 marks out of 100 marks' is that one should pretend that a given task was going to be marked out of 100 (though it will not be, in this unit). So (for example) when an assignment is out of 40, one loses each day 2% of 40 marks, i.e. 0.8 of a mark. And so on. It does not mean '2% per day of the total available for the unit as a whole'--even though the final mark for the unit will be expressed as a percentage.

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Hurdle Due
Minor essay 20% No 14 March 2021
Major essay 40% No 6 June 2021
seminar 40% No different for each student

Minor essay

Assessment Type 1: Essay
Indicative Time on Task 2: 15 hours
Due: 14 March 2021
Weighting: 20%

 

Students will write an essay (word-limit 1500 words including footnotes but not including bibliography list) on a title given in iLearn.

 


On successful completion you will be able to:
  • Apply and assimilate information in a context and at a level appropriate to BPhil level study.
  • Assess relevant sources and issues critically, analytically, and in an integrated fashion.
  • Demonstrate understanding orally and in writing, by deduction and argumentation.
  • Show, orally and in writing, critical understanding of factual questions and judgements of likelihood and value.

Major essay

Assessment Type 1: Essay
Indicative Time on Task 2: 30 hours
Due: 6 June 2021
Weighting: 40%

 

The major essay will be a developed version of the study first presented as an in-class seminar If a student, having given an in-class seminar, finds that its topic has exhausted its potential and wants another, they may ask the unit convener: it will be possible to negotiate an amended or completely new topic. Otherwise, the in-class seminar should be developed into a fully-footnoted major essay (maximum length 3,000 words) with bibliography, on a historiographical theme linked to the original topic.

 


On successful completion you will be able to:
  • Apply and assimilate information in a context and at a level appropriate to BPhil level study.
  • Assess relevant sources and issues critically, analytically, and in an integrated fashion.
  • Demonstrate understanding orally and in writing, by deduction and argumentation.
  • Show, orally and in writing, critical understanding of factual questions and judgements of likelihood and value.
  • Relate understanding of the ancient world to broad conceptual frameworks and modern contexts.
  • Interpret, understand, and advance the state of thinking about the writing of history, including ancient history, and, when appropriate, read against the sources.

seminar

Assessment Type 1: Presentation
Indicative Time on Task 2: 30 hours
Due: different for each student
Weighting: 40%

 

At the beginning of the semester students will be given a topic for a seminar, and allocated a date and time. These seminars will be given two per lecture hour, and each seminar talk should take between fifteen and twenty minutes to deliver. A presenter may use a powerpoint show or equivalent if desired, or just speak to the class. This may be done via a Zoom session. Questions and discussion will follow each seminar talk.

 


On successful completion you will be able to:
  • Apply and assimilate information in a context and at a level appropriate to BPhil level study.
  • Assess relevant sources and issues critically, analytically, and in an integrated fashion.
  • Demonstrate understanding orally and in writing, by deduction and argumentation.
  • Show, orally and in writing, critical understanding of factual questions and judgements of likelihood and value.
  • Interpret, understand, and advance the state of thinking about the writing of history, including ancient history, and, when appropriate, read against the sources.

1 If you need help with your assignment, please contact:

  • the academic teaching staff in your unit for guidance in understanding or completing this type of assessment
  • the Learning Skills Unit for academic skills support.

2 Indicative time-on-task is an estimate of the time required for completion of the assessment task and is subject to individual variation

Delivery and Resources

To complete the unit satisfactorily you will need to achieve an overall mark worth 50% or above Lectures will be recorded and available via Echo 360. Resources are available in iLearn. There are items available for this unit in e-reserve.

Lectures will be given in person, but will be posted online afterwards.

Each student will give a seminar. Most seminars, but not all, will be given in the Friday 12.00 to 1.00 slot in 25 Wally's Walk A204. Distance students may give their seminars using Zoom, but others should be present in person to give their seminars.

PC and Internet access, including Zoom, are required. Basic computer skills (e.g., internet browsing) and skills in word processing are also a requirement. Any problem, contact onehelp@mq.edu.au (9850 4357) and not the unit convener.

Unit Schedule

AHIS7000

Provisional lecture schedule 2021

 

Lecture no.

Date

Title

 

1

25 February

What this unit is about and how it works

Allocation of tasks

2

26 February

Naming the parts

3

4 March

How can archaeology become history? David Randall-MacIver and Great Zimbabwe

4

5 March

Seminar �

5

11 March

Whose interest does history serve? The case of Manetho of Sebennytus

6

12 March

Seminar �

7

18 March

Whose interest does history serve? The case of Eusebius of Caesarea

8

19 March

Seminar �

9

25 March

Oxford Regius Professors of History

10

26 March

Seminar �

11

1 April

Edward Gibbon

12

2 April

Good Friday: no seminar

 

Recess 5-18 April (Easter Sunday 4 April)

 

13

22 April

Seminar �

14

23 April

Seminar �

15

29 April

History in the Scottish universities

16

30 April

Seminar �

17

6 May

Prof. Ian Worthington: Ancient History in American Universities

18

7 May

Seminar �

19

13 May

Assoc. Prof. Nikola Balnave: How and why I became a historian of cooperatives and the labour movement

20

14 May

Seminar �

21

20 May

Prof. Clare Monagle: The Mediæval in the Modern World

22

21 May

Seminar �

23

27 May

Mr. Zac Roberts: What is Indigenous knowledge in the field of history?

24

28 May

Seminar ⓫

25

3 June

Seminar ⓬

26

4 June

Seminar ⓭

 

Policies and Procedures

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central (https://policies.mq.edu.au). Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Students seeking more policy resources can visit Student Policies (https://students.mq.edu.au/support/study/policies). It is your one-stop-shop for the key policies you need to know about throughout your undergraduate student journey.

To find other policies relating to Teaching and Learning, visit Policy Central (https://policies.mq.edu.au) and use the search tool.

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/admin/other-resources/student-conduct

Results

Results published on platform other than eStudent, (eg. iLearn, Coursera etc.) or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent. For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au or if you are a Global MBA student contact globalmba.support@mq.edu.au

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Learning Skills

Learning Skills (mq.edu.au/learningskills) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to help you improve your marks and take control of your study.

The Library provides online and face to face support to help you find and use relevant information resources. 

Student Enquiry Service

For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at ask.mq.edu.au

If you are a Global MBA student contact globalmba.support@mq.edu.au

Equity Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

IT Help

For help with University computer systems and technology, visit http://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/information_technology/help/

When using the University's IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use of IT Resources Policy. The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network including students.