Students

ANTH3023 – Development Studies: Poverty and Global Justice

2021 – Session 1, Special circumstances, North Ryde

Notice

As part of Phase 3 of our return to campus plan, most units will now run tutorials, seminars and other small group activities on campus, and most will keep an online version available to those students unable to return or those who choose to continue their studies online.

To check the availability of face-to-face and online activities for your unit, please go to timetable viewer. To check detailed information on unit assessments visit your unit's iLearn space or consult your unit convenor.

General Information

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Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff
Jaap Timmer
Credit points Credit points
10
Prerequisites Prerequisites
130cp at 1000 level or above
Corequisites Corequisites
Co-badged status Co-badged status
Unit description Unit description

Based on lessons from practical experience in development programs, this unit seeks to address the common perception that even while delivering benefits to many in the developing world, foreign aid 'could and should do better'. We begin with theories of what makes 'development' take place. We examine different models for helping people in poor countries to show how the complexity of international and national relations at the macro-level and social relations at the micro-level makes this such a difficult process. We then explore specific themes in the contemporary practice of 'doing development' such as the changing rhetoric and practices of donor agencies, debt and structural adjustment, China's increasing impact, poverty alleviation and equity, NGOs and community empowerment, gender and social vulnerability, new social movements and sustainability, migration, resettlement and social justice. Students will come to understand donor-driven development as both a way of thinking and a set of practices that affect recipient populations in profound ways.

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at https://students.mq.edu.au/important-dates

Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of this unit, you will be able to:

  • ULO1: Analyse and articulate how and why international aid remains such a contested arena within international relations and such a problematic context for altruistic notions of help.
  • ULO2: Read widely and actively participate in discussions concerning interactions between development agencies and target communities within the developing world and thereby gain a detailed picture of what international aid entails.
  • ULO4: Examine the social outcomes that emerge from programs of international aid by looking beyond the rhetoric and developing an appreciation of the complex factors that influence these outcomes.
  • ULO3: Learn to think critically and reflexively about recent debates informing development, the motivations behind international aid, what makes development assistance successful in improving lives and/or why there are often difficulties in achieving this.
  • ULO5: Demonstrate command of anthropological knowledge and theories relevant to international aid.

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Hurdle Due
Book Review 35% No TBA
Short Report 15% No TBA
Take-home exam 40% No TBA
Participation 10% No Weekly

Book Review

Assessment Type 1: Essay
Indicative Time on Task 2: 30 hours
Due: TBA
Weighting: 35%

 

Students will write a 800-word review on a designated book.

 


On successful completion you will be able to:
  • Analyse and articulate how and why international aid remains such a contested arena within international relations and such a problematic context for altruistic notions of help.
  • Learn to think critically and reflexively about recent debates informing development, the motivations behind international aid, what makes development assistance successful in improving lives and/or why there are often difficulties in achieving this.
  • Demonstrate command of anthropological knowledge and theories relevant to international aid.

Short Report

Assessment Type 1: Report
Indicative Time on Task 2: 10 hours
Due: TBA
Weighting: 15%

 

A short report answering set questions based on assigned readings

 


On successful completion you will be able to:
  • Analyse and articulate how and why international aid remains such a contested arena within international relations and such a problematic context for altruistic notions of help.
  • Examine the social outcomes that emerge from programs of international aid by looking beyond the rhetoric and developing an appreciation of the complex factors that influence these outcomes.
  • Learn to think critically and reflexively about recent debates informing development, the motivations behind international aid, what makes development assistance successful in improving lives and/or why there are often difficulties in achieving this.

Take-home exam

Assessment Type 1: Quiz/Test
Indicative Time on Task 2: 15 hours
Due: TBA
Weighting: 40%

 

This assessment entails two short essays based on assigned questions.

 


On successful completion you will be able to:
  • Analyse and articulate how and why international aid remains such a contested arena within international relations and such a problematic context for altruistic notions of help.
  • Examine the social outcomes that emerge from programs of international aid by looking beyond the rhetoric and developing an appreciation of the complex factors that influence these outcomes.
  • Learn to think critically and reflexively about recent debates informing development, the motivations behind international aid, what makes development assistance successful in improving lives and/or why there are often difficulties in achieving this.
  • Demonstrate command of anthropological knowledge and theories relevant to international aid.

Participation

Assessment Type 1: Participatory task
Indicative Time on Task 2: 12 hours
Due: Weekly
Weighting: 10%

 

Active participation in tutorials and class discussion is expected (for internal students).

 


On successful completion you will be able to:
  • Analyse and articulate how and why international aid remains such a contested arena within international relations and such a problematic context for altruistic notions of help.
  • Read widely and actively participate in discussions concerning interactions between development agencies and target communities within the developing world and thereby gain a detailed picture of what international aid entails.
  • Examine the social outcomes that emerge from programs of international aid by looking beyond the rhetoric and developing an appreciation of the complex factors that influence these outcomes.
  • Learn to think critically and reflexively about recent debates informing development, the motivations behind international aid, what makes development assistance successful in improving lives and/or why there are often difficulties in achieving this.
  • Demonstrate command of anthropological knowledge and theories relevant to international aid.

1 If you need help with your assignment, please contact:

  • the academic teaching staff in your unit for guidance in understanding or completing this type of assessment
  • the Learning Skills Unit for academic skills support.

2 Indicative time-on-task is an estimate of the time required for completion of the assessment task and is subject to individual variation

Delivery and Resources

Special circumstances

Policies and Procedures

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central (https://staff.mq.edu.au/work/strategy-planning-and-governance/university-policies-and-procedures/policy-central). Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Students seeking more policy resources can visit the Student Policy Gateway (https://students.mq.edu.au/support/study/student-policy-gateway). It is your one-stop-shop for the key policies you need to know about throughout your undergraduate student journey.

If you would like to see all the policies relevant to Learning and Teaching visit Policy Central (https://staff.mq.edu.au/work/strategy-planning-and-governance/university-policies-and-procedures/policy-central).

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/admin/other-resources/student-conduct

Results

Results published on platform other than eStudent, (eg. iLearn, Coursera etc.) or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent. For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au or if you are a Global MBA student contact globalmba.support@mq.edu.au

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Learning Skills

Learning Skills (mq.edu.au/learningskills) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to help you improve your marks and take control of your study.

The Library provides online and face to face support to help you find and use relevant information resources. 

Student Enquiry Service

For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at ask.mq.edu.au

If you are a Global MBA student contact globalmba.support@mq.edu.au

Equity Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

IT Help

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