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COGS2010 – Memory

2021 – Session 1, Special circumstances

Notice

As part of Phase 3 of our return to campus plan, most units will now run tutorials, seminars and other small group activities on campus, and most will keep an online version available to those students unable to return or those who choose to continue their studies online.

To check the availability of face-to-face and online activities for your unit, please go to timetable viewer. To check detailed information on unit assessments visit your unit's iLearn space or consult your unit convenor.

General Information

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Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff Lecturer
Paul Strutt
Tutor
McArthur Mingon
Lecturer
Penny Van Bergen
Amanda Barnier
Credit points Credit points
10
Prerequisites Prerequisites
60cp at 1000 level or above
Corequisites Corequisites
Co-badged status Co-badged status
Unit description Unit description

Memory is everywhere - in our personal lives, in popular culture, in big science, and in our machines. But memory is notoriously hard to pin down. Is it all in the brain? Is it in our actions, in our social world, and in our valued objects and places? Or is it now all online? This unit introduces the interdisciplinary study of memory, offering students a critical survey of memory research across the cognitive and brain sciences, the social sciences, and the arts. Emphasis will be placed on autobiographical memory, embodied memory, and shared remembering between individuals. Students will learn to assess scientific and popular claims about what memory is, and how memory loss and gain can be understood in the digital age.

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at https://students.mq.edu.au/important-dates

Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of this unit, you will be able to:

  • ULO1: Demonstrate sound theoretical and technical knowledge of key theoretical frameworks, concepts, and phenomena in memory research.
  • ULO2: Develop critical and analytic capacities to assess scientific and popular claims about memory.
  • ULO3: Explain current concepts, theories, methods, and findings on memory in the cognitive and social sciences.
  • ULO4: Critically evaluate contemporary memory controversies by applying knowledge and problem-solving skills to examples from the field.
  • ULO5: Develop skills in interdisciplinary research, by learning to compare, evaluate, and integrate approaches to memory across the component disciplines of the cognitive sciences.

General Assessment Information

Questions about the assessment tasks?

Please email the unit convenor or your tutor for clarification or questions about any of the assessments.

Word count for written assignments

For written assignments, there will be 5% leeway in the word limit (i.e., up to 100 words over 2000). Beyond that you will be penalised 5% of your report mark for every further 100 words over the limit.

Late Penalty

Late submission of an assignment will attract a penalty of 5% of the maximum mark for every day that the assignment is late (including weekend days). For example, if the assignment is worth 40 marks and your assignment is submitted 2 days late, a penalty of 2x5% x40 = 4 marks will be applied and subtracted from the awarded mark for the assignment. Work submitted more than 14 days after the submission deadline will not be marked and will receive a mark of 0. Please note that it is the student’s responsibility to notify the University of a disruption to their studies and that requests for extensions for assignments must be made via the University’s Ask MQ System (as outlined in the Special Consideration Policy).

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Hurdle Due
Essay 40% No Week 13
Mid-term exams 40% No Weeks 6 and 10
Commentary paper 20% No Week 4

Essay

Assessment Type 1: Essay
Indicative Time on Task 2: 35 hours
Due: Week 13
Weighting: 40%

2000 words maximum


On successful completion you will be able to:
  • Demonstrate sound theoretical and technical knowledge of key theoretical frameworks, concepts, and phenomena in memory research.
  • Develop critical and analytic capacities to assess scientific and popular claims about memory.
  • Explain current concepts, theories, methods, and findings on memory in the cognitive and social sciences.
  • Critically evaluate contemporary memory controversies by applying knowledge and problem-solving skills to examples from the field.
  • Develop skills in interdisciplinary research, by learning to compare, evaluate, and integrate approaches to memory across the component disciplines of the cognitive sciences.

Mid-term exams

Assessment Type 1: Examination
Indicative Time on Task 2: 30 hours
Due: Weeks 6 and 10
Weighting: 40%

Two mid-term exams scheduled throughout the semester. The two exams consist of multiple-choice and short answer questions. Each exam is worth 20% of the final unit mark.


On successful completion you will be able to:
  • Demonstrate sound theoretical and technical knowledge of key theoretical frameworks, concepts, and phenomena in memory research.
  • Develop critical and analytic capacities to assess scientific and popular claims about memory.
  • Explain current concepts, theories, methods, and findings on memory in the cognitive and social sciences.
  • Critically evaluate contemporary memory controversies by applying knowledge and problem-solving skills to examples from the field.
  • Develop skills in interdisciplinary research, by learning to compare, evaluate, and integrate approaches to memory across the component disciplines of the cognitive sciences.

Commentary paper

Assessment Type 1: Report
Indicative Time on Task 2: 20 hours
Due: Week 4
Weighting: 20%

750-1000 words maximum


On successful completion you will be able to:
  • Demonstrate sound theoretical and technical knowledge of key theoretical frameworks, concepts, and phenomena in memory research.
  • Develop critical and analytic capacities to assess scientific and popular claims about memory.
  • Explain current concepts, theories, methods, and findings on memory in the cognitive and social sciences.

1 If you need help with your assignment, please contact:

  • the academic teaching staff in your unit for guidance in understanding or completing this type of assessment
  • the Learning Skills Unit for academic skills support.

2 Indicative time-on-task is an estimate of the time required for completion of the assessment task and is subject to individual variation

Delivery and Resources

Please note that this unit has been altered to accommodate our delivery provisions in compliance with current COVID-19 requirements (Special Circumstance delivery). Learning activities for this unit will be delivered as follows:

Lectures are held weekly, from Week 1 to Week 13. Lectures run from 12 noon to 2pm on Mondays, live online on zoom, with some additional pre-recorded lecture material for specific weeks (details will be provided and updated on iLearn).

Tutes are held weekly, starting in week 2. Tutes are on campus on Tuesdays, or online on zoom on Tuesday at 3.30pm. Lecture slides will be uploaded just before the lecture time under the lecture link in the relevant week in iLearn. Lecture recordings will be available through Echo360.

iLearn

You will need access to the internet to access the unit's iLearn page. Through iLearn you will be able to access the lecture recordings (Echo360), readings, and feedback and marks for the assessment tasks. You are also required to submit two of the assessment tasks (the commentary and the final essay) via iLearn, using the Turnitin submission tool.

Policies and Procedures

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central (https://staff.mq.edu.au/work/strategy-planning-and-governance/university-policies-and-procedures/policy-central). Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Students seeking more policy resources can visit the Student Policy Gateway (https://students.mq.edu.au/support/study/student-policy-gateway). It is your one-stop-shop for the key policies you need to know about throughout your undergraduate student journey.

If you would like to see all the policies relevant to Learning and Teaching visit Policy Central (https://staff.mq.edu.au/work/strategy-planning-and-governance/university-policies-and-procedures/policy-central).

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/admin/other-resources/student-conduct

Results

Results published on platform other than eStudent, (eg. iLearn, Coursera etc.) or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent. For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au or if you are a Global MBA student contact globalmba.support@mq.edu.au

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Learning Skills

Learning Skills (mq.edu.au/learningskills) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to help you improve your marks and take control of your study.

The Library provides online and face to face support to help you find and use relevant information resources. 

Student Enquiry Service

For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at ask.mq.edu.au

If you are a Global MBA student contact globalmba.support@mq.edu.au

Equity Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

IT Help

For help with University computer systems and technology, visit http://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/information_technology/help/

When using the University's IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use of IT Resources Policy. The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network including students.

Statement on Academic Courtesy

It is the right of each student to learn in an environment that is free of disruption and distraction. Please arrive to all classes on time, and if you are unavoidably detained, pleasejoin the lecture or tutorial as quietly as possible to minimise disruption. Phones and other electronic devices that produce noise and other distractions must be turned off prior to entering class. Where your own device (e.g., laptop) is being used for class-related activities such as accessing the Active Learning Platform activities, you are asked to close down all other applications to avoid distraction to you and others.

Please treat your fellow students with the utmost respect. If you are uncomfortable participating in any specific activity, please let your tutor know.

Statement on Social Inclusion and Diversity

Social inclusion at Macquarie University is about giving everyone who has the potential to benefit from higher education the opportunity to study at university, participate in campus life and flourish in their chosen field. The University has made significant moves to promote an equitable, diverse and exciting campus community for the benefit of staff and students. It is your responsibility to contribute towards the development of an inclusive culture and practice in the areas of learning and teaching, research, and service orientation and delivery. As a member of the Macquarie University community, you must not discriminate against or harass others on the basis of their sex, gender, race, marital status, carers' responsibilities, disability, sexual orientation, age, political conviction or religious belief. All lecturers, tutors and students are expected to display appropriate behaviour that is conducive to a healthy learning environment for everyone. The Unit Convenor is happy to provide additional support if needed.