Unit guide CUL 222 Gender, Sexuality, Culture: Queer Theory
Unit Guide

CUL 222

Gender, Sexuality, Culture: Queer Theory

D2 2012

Media, Music, Communication and Cultural Studies

Contents
Disclaimer
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General Information

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Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit Convenor
Nikki Sullivan
Contact via nikki.sullivan@mq.edu.au
Credit points Credit points
3
Prerequisites Prerequisites
3cp in CUL units at 100 level
Corequisites Corequisites
Co-badged status Co-badged status
Unit description Unit description
What is Queer Theory? Rather than attempting to answer this question by identifying a school of thought that is seemingly coherent, unified, stable, and definable, the aim of this unit is to offer a partial mapping of Queer Theory's heterogeneous terrain. Whilst the term queer is used in multiple and even contradictory ways in the texts we examine, for the most part, it functions—at least potentially—to problematise normative consolidations of sex, gender, sexuality. Queer Theory's reconfiguration of these terms and the relations between them, is formulated across a broad range of (often overlapping) topic areas which address issues such as (dis)ability, pleasure, addiction, racialisation, transgenderism, and so on. As a result, each of these concepts and the lived experience(s) of them, is simultaneously (trans)formed. Throughout the unit we critically examine the ways in which such (trans)formations are mobilised in and through a variety of contemporary texts.

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at https://students.mq.edu.au/important-dates

Learning Outcomes

  1. Students will learn to critically analyse the ways in which sex, gender, sexuality, and the relations between them, have been discursively constructed in culturally and historically specific ways
  2. Students will become familiar with different forms of political activism and will develop skills with which to evaluate particular approaches to the solving of problems
  3. Students will learn to identify bias and to develop and implement anti-bias strategies that are appropriate to different aspects of their everyday lives - for example, in the home, the workplace, educational settings, and so on.
  4. Students will be introduced to, and learn to effectively implement, cultural studies knowledges and practices

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Due
Take home exam 20% Monday 3rd September
Essay 1 30% Monday 24th September
Essay 2 40% Monday 12th November
Tutorial participation 10% ongoing

Take home exam

Due: Monday 3rd September
Weighting: 20%

 

Exam questions will be posted on Blackboard on Monday 27th August, and exam papers must be submitted by the close of business (5pm) on Monday 3rd September. Late papers will not be accepted and extensions will not be given.

 

The only exception to not submitting an exam paper at or before the designated time is because of documented illness or unavoidable disruption. In these circumstances you may wish to consider applying for Special Consideration. Information about unavoidable disruption and the special consideration process is available under the Extension and Special Consideration section of this Unit Guide.

 If a Supplementary Take Home Exam is granted as a result of the Special Consideration process, the examination will be scheduled after the conclusion of the official examination period.

This assessment task will assist students in identifying and understanding key concepts and theorists in queer theory.

In doing so, it will furnish students with critical tools for interrogating  the ways in which sex, gender, sexuality, and the relations between them have been discursively constructed in culturally and historically specif ways.

As such it will assist students to develop the ability to ethically engage with normative assumptions, practices, and forms of social relations.

 


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Students will learn to critically analyse the ways in which sex, gender, sexuality, and the relations between them, have been discursively constructed in culturally and historically specific ways
  • Students will be introduced to, and learn to effectively implement, cultural studies knowledges and practices

Essay 1

Due: Monday 24th September
Weighting: 30%

 

A 2,000 word essay in which you are expected to critically reflect on an aspect of your life experience, and then theorise this with reference to the set readings on homophobia and the film Licensed to Kill. Essay questions will be posted on Blackboard.

This task requires students to critically analyse aspects of their own lives in light of the lecture, readings, and film on homophobia and its effects. In doing so students will draw on and apply discipline specific knowledges and practices to everyday life. They will develop a sense of the different forms of activism that challenging homophobia might take, and be required to evalute particular approaches to the solving of social problems. Students will learn the importance of applying anti-bias strategies in their everyday lives, as well as in the workplace, in educational settings, and so on.

 


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Students will learn to critically analyse the ways in which sex, gender, sexuality, and the relations between them, have been discursively constructed in culturally and historically specific ways
  • Students will become familiar with different forms of political activism and will develop skills with which to evaluate particular approaches to the solving of problems
  • Students will learn to identify bias and to develop and implement anti-bias strategies that are appropriate to different aspects of their everyday lives - for example, in the home, the workplace, educational settings, and so on.
  • Students will be introduced to, and learn to effectively implement, cultural studies knowledges and practices

Essay 2

Due: Monday 12th November
Weighting: 40%

A 2,500 word essay in which you must critically engage with two of the topics discussed in the unit, at least three of the set readings, and two other scholarly texts. Essay questions will be posted on Blackboard after the mid semester break.

This task is designed to give students the oppofrunity to showcase the discipline specific skills and knowledges that they have developed throughout the unit. Essays will be graded on the extent to which they demonstrate an understanding of the key concepts and theorists associated with the topic discussed; critical analysis skills; understanding of the socio-political relevance of the issues discussed; and the ability to effectively communicate the ideas, debates, concepts and so on coverd in the essay.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Students will learn to critically analyse the ways in which sex, gender, sexuality, and the relations between them, have been discursively constructed in culturally and historically specific ways
  • Students will become familiar with different forms of political activism and will develop skills with which to evaluate particular approaches to the solving of problems
  • Students will learn to identify bias and to develop and implement anti-bias strategies that are appropriate to different aspects of their everyday lives - for example, in the home, the workplace, educational settings, and so on.
  • Students will be introduced to, and learn to effectively implement, cultural studies knowledges and practices

Tutorial participation

Due: ongoing
Weighting: 10%

All students are expected to attend tutorials and participate in tutorial discussions. Your grade will depend on the quantity and the quality of participation.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Students will be introduced to, and learn to effectively implement, cultural studies knowledges and practices

Delivery and Resources

Lectures for this unit will be on from 9am-12noon on Thursdays in W5A 101. This time slot will include a 1 hour lecture, followed by a 2 hour screening. The majoriyt of the films screened are availalbe in the Maquarie University library.

There is an iLearn site for this unit. All lecture slides, assessment instructions, announcements etc will be posted on there. There will also be a link to audio recordings of lectures.

Each year this unit is revised in response to student feedback. This year we have removed one of the assessment tasks, have added new readings, and ensured that the first assessment task is scheduled early in the unit.

Unit Schedule

 

GENDER AND SEXUALITY (Week beginning Monday 30th July)

 

This week you will be introduced to the major ways in which gender, sexuality, and the relation between them, have been understood in Western modernity. In particular, we will focus on essentialist and social constructionist accounts of gender and sexuality and interrogate the assumptions that underpin them and the kinds of socio-political practices they give rise to.

 

Essential Readings:

·         Glover, David and Cora Kaplan (2009) “Introduction: Gendered Histories, Gendered Contexts”, in Genders (2nd edition), London: Routledge, pp.1-25.

 

Screening: Ma Vie en Rose

 

Further Readings

·         Adams, R & D. Savran (eds.) (2002) The Masculinity Studies Reader, London: Blackwell.

·         Beasley, Chris (1999) What is Feminism?: An Introduction to Feminist Theory, London: Sage.

·         Beasley, Chris (2005) Gender & Sexuality: Critical Theories, Critical Thinkers, London: Sage.

·         Bradley, Harriet (2007) Gender, London: Blackwell.

·         Brod, H & M Kaufman (eds.) (1994) Theorizing Masculinities, London: Sage.

·         Hale, Jacob (2006) “Are Lesbians Women?”, in S. Stryker and S. Whittle (eds.) The Transgender Studies Reader, NY: Routledge.

·         Just Genes? Video recording available in the MQ library.

·         Kimmel, M (2000) The Gendered Society, Oxford: Oxford Uni Press.

·         Laqueur, Thomas (1990) Making Sex: Body and Gender From the Greeks to Freud, Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard Uni Press.

·         Lorber, (2000) “Using Gender to Undo Gender”, Feminist Theory, 1:1.

 

SEXOLOGY: NATURALISATION AND PATHOLOGISATION (Week beginning Monday 6th August) NS

 

This lecture will focus on the medicalisation of sexuality as it has developed since the early nineteenth century. We will discuss the works of a number of influential sexologists of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, look at contemporary examples of sex research, and consider the ways in which such work either naturalises or pathologises certain kinds of sex and those who practice it.

 

Screening: Kinsey

 

Essential Readings:

·         A Critical Introduction to Queer Theory, Chapter 1.

·         Seller, Terence (2006) ‘Introduction’, Psychopathia Sexualis: The Case Histories, Wet Angel Books.

·         Krafft-Ebing, Richard von (2006) ‘Case 125: Zoophilia’, inPsychopathia Sexualis: The Case Histories, Wet Angel Books.

·         Kafka, Martin P. (2009) ‘The DSM Diagnostic Criteria for Paraphilia Not Otherwise Specified’, Archives of Sexual Behaviour, doi: 10.1007

 

Further Readings:

·         Bland, Lucy & Laura Doan (eds) (1998) Sexology in Culture: Labelling Bodies and Desires, Cambridge: Polity Press.

·         Faderman, Lillian (1991) “Sexual Inversion and ‘Masculine’ or Transvestite women”, in Odd Girls and Twilight Lovers: A History of Lesbian Life in Twentieth-Century America, New York: Columbia Uni Press.

·         Freud, Sigmund (1905) “The Sexual Aberrations” (condensed version) in Donald Morton (ed) The Material Queer: A LesBiGay Cultural Studies Reader, Westview Press.

·         Hitchcock, Tim (2002) ‘Redefining Sex in 18th Century England’, in Kim Phillips & Barry Reay (eds.) Sexualities in History: A Reader, NY: Routledge.

·         Oosterhuis, Harry (2002) ‘Richard von Krafft-Ebing’s “Step Children of Nature”’, in Kim Phillips & Barry Reay (eds.) Sexualities in History: A Reader, NY: Routledge.

·         Ulrichs, Karl Heinrich (1994) The Riddle of “Man-Manly” Love, M. A. Lombardi-Nash (trans.) New York: Prometheus Books.

 

SAME-SEX DESIRE: SIN, CRIME, SICKESS, PRIDE (Week beginning Monday 13th August) NS

 

In this lecture I will outline some of the ways in which 'homosexuality' has been discursively constructed in the West over the last couple of centuries, and ask what such theories might tell us about the relationship between subjectivity, sociality, and systems of power/knowledge. I will then go on to look at the shift from a homophile assimilationist politics to a liberationist politics, and more particularly, with the changing discourses and practices that made such a shift possible. I will focus on the emergence of Gay and Lesbian Liberation and show what model of subjectivity and social relations informed the liberationist approach, and examine how and why this might differ from the theoretical underpinnings of assimilationism. I will also provide a historical overview of the discursive construction of lesbianism and the integral role that gender has played in this, and analyse the theoretical similarities and differences between liberationist accounts of male homosexuality and various feminist notions of lesbianism, and the assumptions that inform them.

 

Essential Readings:

·         A Critical Introduction to Queer Theory, Chapter 2

·         Onlywomen Collective (eds.) (1984) Love Your Enemy?: The Debate Between Heterosexual Feminism and Political Lesbianism, London: Onlywomen Press.

·         Gay Liberation Front (1971) Gay Liberation Manifesto, http://wwww.anu.edu.au/polsci/marx/gayleft/gaylibmanifesto.rtf

 

 

Screening: Stonewall

 

Further Readings:

·         Berry, Chris (1997) ‘History, Herstory, Queerstory? Stonewall—The Movie’, in Critical InQueeries, 1:3, pp.133-44.

·         Donoghue, Emma (1993) Passions Between Women: British Lesbian Culture 1668-1801, London: Scarlet Press.

·         Halperin, David (2002) “Forgetting Foucault: Acts, Identities and the History of Sexuality’, in Kim Phillips & Barry Reay (eds.) Sexualities in History: A Reader, NY: Routledge.

·         Ion, Judith (1997) ‘Degrees of Separation: Lesbian Separatist Communities in Northern New South Wales, 1974-95’, in Jill Julius Matthews (ed.), Sex In Public: Australian Sexual Cultures, Sydney: Allen & Unwin, pp.97-113.

·         Johnston, Craig (1999) A Sydney Gaze: The Making of Gay Liberation, Sydney: Schiltron Press.

·         O'Sullivan, Kimberley (1997) ‘Dangerous Desire: Lesbianism as Sex or Politics’, in Jill Julius Matthews (ed.), Sex in Public: Australian Sexual Cultures, Sydney: Allen & Unwin, pp.114-26.

·         Puff, Helmut (2000) “Female sodomy: The Trial of Katherina Hetzeldorfer (1477)”, in Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies, 30:1.

·         Reynolds, Robert (2002) From Camp to Queer, Melbourne: Melbourne University Press.

·         Rosario, Vernon A. (ed) (1997) Science and Homosexualities, New York: Routledge.

·         Terry, Jennifer (1995) “Anxious Slippages Between ‘Us’ and ‘Them’: A Brief History of the Scientific Search for Homosexual Bodies”, in J. Terry & J. Urla (eds.) Deviant Bodies: Critical Perspectives on Difference in Science and Popular Culture, Indianapolis: Indiana University Press.

·         Weeks, Jeffrey (1981) Sex, Politics, and society: The Regulation of Sexuality Since 1800, London: Longman.

 

QUEER THEORY (Week beginning Monday 20th August) NS

 

In this lecture I will discuss the emergence of queer theory and/or politics and the discourses that inform it. The aim of this lecture is firstly, to outline some of the fundamental tenets of poststructuralism, and secondly, to examine the impact of these ideas on the ways in which sexuality and sexual politics came to be theorised and practised.

 

Essential Readings:

·         A Critical Introduction to Queer Theory, Chapter 3

·         Foucault, Michel (1980) excerpts from “The Repressive Hypothesis” in The History of Sexuality Volume I: An Introduction, New York: Vintage.

 

 Screening: But I’m A Cheerleader

 

Further Readings:

·         Angelides, Stephen (1994) ‘The Queer Intervention’, in Melbourne Journal of Politics, 22, pp.66-88.

·         Butler, Judith (1993) ‘Critically Queer’, in GLQ: A Journal of Lesbian and Gay Studies, 1:1, pp.17-32.

·         Dale, Catherine (1997) ‘A Debate Between Queer and Feminism’, in Critical InQueeries, 1:3, pp.145-58.

·         de Lauretis, Teresa (1991) ‘Queer Theory: Lesbian and Gay Sexualities’, in Differences: A Journal of Feminist Cultural Studies, 3:2, p.iii-xviii.

·         Duggan, Lisa (1992) “Making it Perfectly Queer”, in Socialist Review, 22:1.

·         Giffney, Noreen and Michael O’Rourke (eds.) (2009) The Ashgate Research Companion to Queer Theory, Aldershot: Ashgate.

·         Huffer, Lynne (2009) Mad for Foucault: Rethinking the Foundations of Queer Theory, New York: Columbia University Press.

·         Jagose, Annamarie (1996) ‘The Post-structuralist Context of Queer’, Queer Theory,  pp.75-83, and “Queer Identity” pp.96-100.

·         McIntosh, Mary (1993) ‘Queer Theory and The War of the Sexes’ in Activating Theory, London: Lawrence & Wishart, pp.30-52.

·         Reynolds, Robert (2002) From Camp to Queer: Remaking the Australian Homosexual, Melbourne: Melbourne University Press.

·         Warner, Michael (1993) Fear of A Queer Planet: Queer Politics and Social Theory, Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.

·         Ruffolo, David (2009) Post-Queer Politics, Aldershot: Ashgate.

 

PERFORMATIVITY (Wednesday Monday 27th August) NS

 

This lecture looks at the notion of performativity popularised by the work of Judith Butler, and the ways in which Butler's claim that gender is performative rather than essential, has been taken up by contemporary theorists, particularly her positing of drag as an example of performativity. I will also provide a brief overview of Foucault’s and Merleau-Ponty’s accounts of subjectivity, power, the body, the other, and the relations between them, in order to develop a more detailed understanding of  the politics of performativity.

 

Essential Readings:

·         A Critical Introduction to Queer Theory, Chapter 5

·         Lloyd, Moya (1999) ‘Performativity, Parody, Politics’, Theory, Culture & Society, 16:2.

·         hooks, bell (1992) “Is Paris Burning?”, in Black Looks: Race and Representation, Boston: South End Press.

 

Screening: Paris is Burning.

 

Further Readings:

·         Bell, Vicki (ed) (1999) Performativity and Belonging, London: Sage.

·         Brook, Barbara (1999) “Performance and Spectacle”, in Feminist Perspectives on the Body, London: Longman.

·         Butler, Judith (1990) Gender Trouble: Feminism and the Subversion of Identity, New York: Routledge.

·         Butler, Judith (1993) “Gender Is Burning: Questions of Appropriation and Subversion”, chapter 4 of Bodies That Matter: On the Discursive Limits of “Sex”, New York: Routledge.

·         Champagne, John (1995) ‘”I Just Wanna Be A Rich Somebody”: Experience, Common Sense, and Paris Is Burning’, in The Ethics of Marginality: A New Approach to Gay Studies, Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, pp.88-128.

·         Harper, Brian Philip (1999) “’The Subversive Edge’: Paris Is Burning, Social Critique and the Limits of Subjective Agency”, in Private Affairs: Critical Ventures in The Culture of Social Relations, New York: New York Uni Press.

·         Maltz, Robin (1998) “Real Butch: The Performance/Performativity of Male Impersonation, Drag Kings, Passing as Male, and Stone Butch Realness”, in Journal of Gender Studies, 7:3.

·         Weston, Kath (1993) “Do Clothes Make the Woman?: Gender, Performance Theory, and Lesbian Eroticism”, in Genders Vol. 17, Fall.

 

QUEER RACE (Week beginning Monday 3rd September) NS

 

This lecture engages with the claim made by an increasing number of contemporary theorists that queer theory has not only been silent in regards to questions of race, but more importantly, that in failing to acknowledge the racial constitution of all identities, queer theory reproduces racism and normalises whiteness. Consequently, the aim of the lecture is to investigate this problematic through a discussion of various attempts to theorise the place of race in sexual identity and theories of sexuality, and the role that sexuality might play in understandings of race.

 

Essential Readings:

·         A Critical Introduction to Queer Theory, Chapter 4

·         Laforteza, Elaine (2006) ‘What a Drag! Filipina/White Australian Relations in The Adventures of Priscilla, Queen of the Desert”, ACRAWSA e-journal 2:2.

 

Screening: The Adventures of Priscilla, Queen of the Desert

 

Further Readings:

·         Anzaldúa, Gloria. (1987) Borderlands/La Frontera, San Francisco, CA: Aunt Lute Books.

·         Dunning, Stefanie (2009) Queer in Black and White: Interraciality, Same Sex Desire and Contemporary African American Culture, Indian University Press.

·         Eng, David (2001) Racial castration: Managing masculinity in Asian America, Durham, NC: Duke University Press

·         Gopinath, Gayatri (2005) Impossible Desires, Durham, NC: Duke University Press.

·         Han, Chong-Suk (2007) ‘They Don’t Want to Cruise Your Type: Gay Men of Colour and the Racial Politics of Exclusion’, Social Identities, vol. 13.

·         Hawley, John (2001)  Postcolonial, Queer: Theoretical intersections, Albany, NY: SUNY

·         Khoo, Tseen-Ling (2003) Banana Bending: Asian-Australian and Asian-Canadian Literatures, Hong Kong Uni Press.

·         Luibhéid, Eithne & Cantú, Lionel (2005) Queer migrations: Sexuality, US citizenship and border crossings, Minneapolis, MN: Minnesota.

·         McWhorter, Ladelle (2004) “Sex, Race and Biopower: A Foucauldian Genealogy”, Hypatia, 19:3, pp.38-62.

·         Muñoz, José Esteban  (1999) Disidentifications: Queers of color and the performance of politic,  Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota Press.

·         Patton, Cindy & Benigno Sanchez-Eppler (2000) Queer diasporas,Durham, NC: Duke Unviersity Press.

·         Stockton, Kathryn Boyd (2006) Beautiful bottom, beautiful shame: Where ‘Black’ meets ‘Queer’, Durham, NC: Duke University Press.

·         Sullivan, Gerard and Peter Jackson (2001) Gay and Lesbian Asia: Culture, Identity, Community, Special issue of the Journal of Homosexuality, vol. 40.

·         Tuhkanen, Mikko (2009) ‘Queer Hybridity’, in C. Nigianni and M. Storr (eds.) Deleuze and Queer Theory, Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press.

·         Yue, Audrey (1996) “Colour Me Queer: Some Notes Towards the NESBian” in Meanjin 55:1 (special issue entitled Australia Queer edited by Annamarie Jagose and Chris Berry).

 

HOMOPHOBIA (Week beginning Monday 10th September) NS

 

In this lecture we will explore the term homophobia and come to see that homophobic behaviour does not always involve explicit acts of violence. We will also ask what the relationship between homophobia and gender might be, and whether or not religion, education, the media, play an active role in the (re)production of homophobia.

 

Required Readings:

·         Kimmel, Michael (1994) ‘Masculinity as Homophobia: Fear, Shame and Silence in the Construction of Gender Identity’, republished in N. Cook (ed.) Gender Relations in Global Perspective: Essential Readings, Canadian Scholar’s Press.

·         O’Brien, Jodi (2008) ‘Complicating Homophobia’, Sexualities, 11:4, pp.496-512.

·         Fone, Byrne (2000) ‘Inventing Sodom’, in Homophobia: A History, New York: Picador.

 

Screening: Licensed to Kill

 

Further Reading:

·         Alden, Helena and Karen F. Parker (2005) “Gender Role Ideology, Homophobia and Hate Crime: Linking Attitudes to Macro-level Anti-gay and Lesbian Hate Crimes”, Deviant Behaviour, 26, pp.321-43.

·         Butler, Judith (2005) ‘Contagious Word: Paranoia and “Homosexuality” in the Military’, in I. Morland & A. Willox (eds.) Queer Theory, London: Palgrave Macmilan.

·         Grace, Andre (2008) ‘The Charisma and Deception of Reparative Therapies: When Medical Science Beds Religion’, Journal of Homosexuality, 55:4.

·         Hardin, Marie et al (2009) ‘”Have you got game?”: Hegemonic Masculinity and Neo-Homophobia in U.S. Newspaper Sports Columns’, Communication, Culture & Critique, 2:2.

·         Harper, Phillip Brian (1993) ‘Eloquence and Epitaph: Black Nationalism and the Homophobic Impulse in Response to the Death of Max Robinson’, in H. Abelove et. al. (eds.) The Lesbian and Gay Studies Reader, NY: Routledge.

·         Jung, Patricia Beattie & Ralph Smith (1993) Heterosexism: An Ethical Challenge, Albany: SUNY.

·         Mason, Gail (2002) The Spectacle of Violence: Homophobia, Gender and Knowledge, NY: Routledge.

·         Mogul, Joey (2005) ‘The Dykier, the Butcher, the Better: The States Use of Homophobia and Sexism to Execute Women in the US’, New York City Law Review, 8:473.

·         Norman, James and Miriam Galvin (2006) ‘Straight Talk: An Investigation of Attitudes and Experiences of Homophobic Bullying in Second-Level Schools’, Dublin: Dept of Education and Science.

·         Plummer David (1999) One of the boys: Masculinity, Homophobia and Modern Manhood, New York: Harrington Park Press.

·         Robinson, Shirleene (2008) Homophobia: An Australian History, Federation Press.

·         Ronner, Amy D (2005) Homophobia and the Law, Washington DC: American Psychiatric Association.

·         Smith, Barbara (1993) ‘Homophobia: Why Bring it Up?’, in H. Abelove et. al. (eds.) The Lesbian and Gay Studies Reader, NY: Routledge.

·         Tomsen, Stephen (2006) ‘Homophobic Violence, Cultural Essentialisms and Shifting Sexual Identities’ Social and Legal Studies, 15:3.

·         Tomsen, Stephen (2002) Hatred, Murder, and Male Honour: Anti-homosexual homicides in NSW 1980-2000, Canberra: Australian Institute of Criminology.

·         White, Jennifer (2008) ‘A Brief Report: The Defense Mechanism of Homophobic Adolescent Males: A descriptive discriminant analysis’, Journal of Adolescence.

 

Video recordings (films and tv programs) available at MQ library:

The Laramie Project

Outing Gay Hate

Assault on Gay America

Climate for Murder

The Darker Side of Black



 

MID SEMESTER BREAK MONDAY 17TH SEPTEMBER - FRIDAY 28TH SEPTEMBER

 

SEXUALITY AND DISABILITY (Weeek beginning Monday 1st October) Guest lecture by Matthew Bowden from People with Disability (PWD) and Saul who will talk about the Touching Base project

 

·         Wilkerson, Abby (2002) “Disability, Sex Radicalism, and Political Agency”, NWSA Journal, 14:3.

·         Shildrick, Margrit (2009) ‘Queer Pleasures’ in Dangerous Discourses of Disability, Subjectivity and Sexuality, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.

 

Screening: Untold Desires

 

Further Readings:

·         Clare, Eli (1999) Exile & pride, Southend Press.

·         Clare, Eli (2001) “Stolen bodies, reclaimed bodies: Disability and queerness”, Public Culture, 13(3), 359-365.

·         Courvant, Diana (1999) “Coming out disabled: A transsexual woman considers queer contributions to living with disability”, Journal of Gay, Lesbian & Bisexual Identity, 4(1), 97-105.

·         Davis, Lennard J (2002) Bending over backwards: Disability, dismodernism & other difficult positions, New York: New York University Press.

·         Davis, Lennard J (1997) Disability Studies Reader, New York: Routledge.

·         McRuer, Robert (2003) “As Good As It Gets: Queer Theory and Critical Disability”, GLQ, 9:1-2.

·         Mitchell, David T & Sharon L Snyder (1997) Body and Physical Difference: Discourses of Disability, Ann Arbor: University of Michigan.

·         Samuels, Ellen. (2003) “My body, my closet”, GLQ: A journal of lesbian and gay studies, 9 (1/2), 233-255.

·         Shildrick, Margrit (2005) “Dangerous discourses: Anxiety, desire, and disability”, Studies in Gender and Sexuality.

·         Sobsey, Dick (1991) Disability, Sexuality, and Abuse: an annotated bibliography, Baltimore: P. H. Brookes Pub. Co.

·         Special Issue on Queerness and Disabilities (2003) GLQ:  A journal of lesbian and gay studies, 9 (1/2), 1-23.

·         Tremain, Shelley (2000) “Queering Disabled Sexuality Studies”, Sexuality & Disability 18(4).

·         White, Patrick (2003) “Sex Education: Or, How the Blind Became Heterosexual”, GLQ, 9:1-2.

 

 

ANIMAL SEX AND SPECIES BOUNDARIES (Week beginning Monday 8th October) NS

 

Attempts to understand human sexual development and sexual practices are often informed by research on and/or popular assumptions about animal sex. This week we consider the ways in which perceptions about animal sex have been used to argue that particular human sex acts and/or relations are either natural or unnatural. Moving beyond this perspective, we will interrogate the role of the figure of the animal (and of animal sex) in the construction of the human, thus queering what is commonly assumed to the clear distinction between them.

 

Essential Readings:

·         Bagemihl, Bruce (1999) “The Birds and the Bees”, in Biological Exuberance: Animal Homosexuality and Natural Diversity, New York: St Martin’s Press.

·         Hird, Myra (2008) ‘Animal Trans’, in N. Giffney and M.J. Hird (eds.) Queering the Non/Human, Aldershot: Ashgate.

 

Screening: Dr Tatiana’s Sex Advice to All Creation

 

Further Readings:

·         Birke, Lynda, Mette Bryld, and Nina Lykke (2004) ‘Animal Performances:An exploration of intersections between feminist science studies and studies of human/animal relationships’, Feminist Theory, 5:2, pp.167-83.

·         Calarco, Matthew (2008) Zoographies: The Question of the Animal from Heidegger to Derrida, New York: Columbia University Press.

·         Cassidy, Rebecca (2009) ‘Zoosex and other Relationships with Animals’, in H. Donnan & F. Macgowan (eds) Transgressive Sex: Subversion and Control in Erotic Encounters, Berghahan Books.

·         Giffney, Noreen and Myra Hird (eds.) (2008) Queering the Non/Human, Aldershot: Ashgate.

·         Haraway, Donna (2003) The Companion Species Manifesto. Dogs, People, and Significant Otherness. Chicago: Prickly Paradigm Press

·         Hird, Myra (2004) ‘Naturally Queer’, Feminist Theory, 5:1, pp.85-9.

·         Lingis, Alphonso (2003) ‘Animal Body, Inhuman Face’, In C. Wolfe (ed.) Zoontologies. The Question of the Animal, Minneapolis: The University of Minnesota Press pp. 165-182

·         Lundblad, Michael (2009) ‘Epistemology of the Jungle: Progressive-Era Sexuality and the Nature of the Beast’, American Literature, 81:4, pp747-773.

·         MacCormack, Patricia (2009) ‘Unnatural Alliances’, in C. Nigianni and M. Storr (eds.) Deleuze and Queer Theory, Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press.

·         Mortimer-Sandilands, Catriona (2005) ‘Unnatural Passions? Notes Toward a Queer Ecology’, Invisible Culture: An Electronic Journal for Visual Culture, Issue 9.

·         Nast, Heidi J. (2006) ‘Loving … Whatever: Alienation, Neoliberalism and Pet-Love in the Twenty-First Century’, ACME: An International E-journal for Critical Geographies, 5:2, pp.300-27.

·         Roughgarden, Joan (2009) Evolution’s Rainbow: Diversity, Gender and Sexuality in Nature and People, Berkeley: University of California Press.

·         Sommer, Volker and Paul L. Vasey (2006) Homosexual Behaviour in Animals: an Evolutionary Perspective, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

·         Terry, Jennifer (2000) ‘”Unnatural Acts” in Nature: The Scientific Fascination with Queer Animals’, GLQ, 6:2, pp.151-93.

 

QUE(E)RYING STRAIGHT SEX (Week beginning Monday 15th October) NS

 

What has ‘straight sex’ got to do with queer theory and what does queer theory have to say to, or about, ‘straight sex’?  In this lecture I explore the possible relation between queer theory and ‘straight sex’ via two means. Firstly, I consider what it might mean to 'queer' straight sex, and secondly I raise a number of issues concerning how, and why, it might be possible and/or profitable for those who identify, and are identified, as ‘straight’, to participate in the elaboration of queer criticism.

 

Essential Readings:

·         A Critical Introduction to Queer Theory, Chapter 7

·         O’Rourke, Michael (2005) ‘On the Eve of a Queer-Straight Future: An Antinormatice Heteroerotic, Feminism & Psychology, 15:1.

·         Waldby, Catherine (1995) ‘Destruction: Boundary Erotics and Refigurations of the Heterosexual Male Body’, in E. Grosz and E. Probyn (eds.) Sexy Bodies: The Strange Carnalities of Feminism, New York: Routledge.

 

Screening: Episode of Southpark (‘Cartman’s Mum’s a Dirty Slut’)

 

Further Readings:

·         Albury, Kath (2002) Yes Means Yes: Getting Explicit About Heterosex, Sydney: Allen & Unwin.

·         Dyer, Richard (1997) “Heterosexuality”, in A. Medhurst & S. Munt (eds.) Lesbian and Gay Studies: A Critical Introduction, London: Cassell.

·         Ferguson, Anne  J. N. Zita, K. Pyne Addleson (1981) “On ‘Compulsory Heterosexuality and Lesbian Existence’: Defining the Issues”, in Signs 7:1.

·         Hill, Darryl (2006) ‘”Feminine” Heterosexual Men: Subverting Heteropatriarchal Sexual Scripts?’, Journal of Men’s Studies, 14:2.

·         Jeffreys, Sheila (1998) “Heterosexuality and the Desire for Gender”, in D. Richardson (ed) Theorising Heterosexuality: Telling it Straight, Philadelphia: open University Press.

·         Katz, Jonathan Ned (1996) The Invention of Heterosexuality, Harmondsworth: Penguin.

·         Kwok, Wei Leng (1996) ‘Que(e)rying Straight Sex’ in Critical InQueeries, 1:1.

·         Overall, Christine (1999) “Heterosexuality and Feminist Theory”, in K. Lebacqz and D. Sinacore-Guinn (eds.) Sexuality: A Reader, Ohio: The Pilgrim Press.

·         Rich, Adrienne (1980) “Compulsory Heterosexuality and Lesbian Existence”, in Signs 5:4.

·         Richardson, Diane (ed) 1996) Theorising Heterosexuality: Telling it Straight, Philadelphia: Open University Press.

·         Schlichter, Annette (2004) ‘Queer at Last? Straight Intellectuals and the Desire for Transgression’, GLQ, 10:4.

·         Segal, Lynne (1994) Straight Sex: Rethinking the Politics of Pleasure, Berkeley: University of California Press.

·         Segal, Lynne (1997) “Feminist Sexual Politics and the Heterosexual Predicament”, in L. Segal (ed.) New Sexual Agendas, New York: New York Uni Press.

·         Stevi Jackson and Sue Scott (eds.) Feminism and Sexuality: A Reader, New York: Columbia Uni Press.

·         Thomas, Calvin (2000) ”Straight With A Twist: Queer Theory and the Subject of Heterosexuality”, in Straight With A Twist: Queer Theory and the Subject of Heterosexuality, Chicago: University of Illinois Press.

·         Wilkinson, Sue and Celia Kitzinger (1993) Heterosexuality: A Feminism & Psychology Reader, London: Sage.

·         Wittig, Monique (1992) “The Straight Mind”, in The Straight Mind and Other Essays, New York” Harvester Wheatsheaf.

 

Reading Week – no lecture, no tutorials (week beginning Monday 22nd October)

 

 

SEX AS ADDICTION (Week beginning Monday 29th October) SM

 

In this lecture, we will look at the growing interest in pathologising some sexual behaviours as being indicative of ‘sexual addiction’. This ‘condition’ has garnered considerable mainstream and popular interest, and we will discuss the various discourses and narratives that underpin mainstream understandings of sexual addiction as pathological.

 

Essential Readings:

  • Keane, Helen (2002) “Sex and Love Addiction: The Ethics and Erotics of Intimacy” in What’s Wrong with Addiction? Carlton South: Melbourne University Press
  • Krafft-Ebing, Richard von (2006) ‘Case 189: Nymphomania’, in Psychopathia Sexualis, Wet Angel Books.
  • Delmonico, David (1997) ‘Cybersex: High tech sex addiction’, in Sexual Addiction and Compulsivity, 4:2.
  • Dow, Steve (2010) ‘Constant craving: the secret life of sex addicts’, in Life & Style, The Sydney Morning Herald, Jan 7th.

 

Screening: No screening this week

 

Further Readings:

  • Carnes, Patrick (2001) Out of the Shadows: Understanding Sexual Addiction, Hazelden.
  • Carnes, Patrick & Kenneth Adams (eds.) (2002) Clinical Management of Sex Addiction, Psychology Press.
  • Chivers, Meredith (2005) ‘Clinical Management of Sex Addiction’, Archives of Sexual Behaviour, 34:4.
  • Grundner, T. M. (2000) The Skinner Box Effect: Sexual Addiction and Online Pornography, Writers Club Press.
  • Irvine, Janice (1995) “Reinventing Perversion: Sex Addiction and Cultural Anxieties” in Journal of the History of Sexuality, vol 5 (3) pp 429
  • Laqueur, Thomas W. (2003) Solitary Sex: A Cultural History of Masturbation, New York: Zone Books.
  • Fuller, Barnabus (2006) The Devil Dog Road by Mr Mo: - Masturbation and Pornography – Overcoming Sexual Addiction, AuthorHouse.
  • Parker, Carol (1997) The joy of cybersex : confessions of an Internet addict, Kew VIC: Mandarin.
  • Skinner, Kevin (2005) Treating Pornography Addiction: The Essential Tools for Recovery, GrowthClimate.
  • Terry, Jennifer & Jacqueline Urla (1995) Deviant Bodies: critical perspectives on difference in science and popular culture, Bloomington: Indiana University Press

 

TRANSSEXUALISM/TRANSGENDER (Week beginning Monday 5th November) NS

 

In recent years, there has been an explosion of interest amongst cultural theorists in a range of ‘ambiguous’ forms of sexuality and gender identity. This lecture outlines the debates that have arisen around the tension between identity politics and what some critics have referred to as a politics of ambiguity. I provide definitions of transsexualism and transgender, the similarities and differences between them, and the ways in which these terms have been taken up and/or challenged by a number of theorists.

 

Essential Readings:

·         A Critical Introduction to Queer Theory, Chapter 6

·         Cauldwell, David O (2006) ‘Psychopathia Transsexualis’, in S. Stryker & S. Whittle (eds.) The Transgender Studies Reader, New York: Routledge.

·         Raymond, Janice (2006) ‘Sappho by Surgery: The Transsexually Constructed Lesbian-Feminist’, in S. Stryker & S. Whittle (eds.) The Transgender Studies Reader, New York: Routledge.

 

·         Screening: American Beauties

 

Further Readings:

·         Ames, Jonathan (ed.) (2005) Sexual Metamorphosis: An Anthology of Transsexual Memoirs, NY: Vintage Books.

·         Califia, Pat (1997) Sex Changes: The Politics of Transgenderism, San Francisco: Cleis Press.

·         Califia, Patrick (2006) ‘Manliness’, in S. Stryker & S. Whittle (eds.) The Transgender Studies Reader, NY: Routledge.

·         Ekins, Richard & Dave King (eds.) (1996) Blending Genders: Social Aspects of Cross-Dressing and Sex-Changing, London: Routledge.

·         Halberstam, Judith (1998) “Transgender Butch: Butch/FTM Border Wars and the Masculine Continuum”, in GLQ 4:3.

·         Halberstam, Judith (2005) In a Queer Time and Place: Transgender Bodies, Subcultural Lives, NY: NY Uni Press.

·         Hale, C. Jacob (1997) “Leatherdyke boys and Their Daddies: How to Have Sex Without Women or Men”, in Social Text 52/53, 15:3-4, Fall-Winter.

·         Hines, Sally (2006) ‘What’s the Difference? Bringing Particularlity to Queer Studies of Transgender’, Journal of Gender Studies, 15:1.

·         Koyama, Emi (2006) ‘Whose Feminism is it Anyway? The Unspoken Racism of the Trans Inclusion Debate’, in S. Stryker & S. Whittle (eds.) The Transgender Studies Reader, NY: Routledge.

·         Martin, Fran & Josephine Ho (2006) ‘Trans/Asia, Trans/gender’, Inter-Asia Cultural Studies, 7:2.

·         Meyerowitz, Joanne (2002) How Sex Changed: A History of Transsexuality in the United States, Cambridge, MASS.: Harvard University Press.

·         Namaste, Ki (1996) “Tragic Misreadings: Queer Theory’s Erasure of Transgender Subjectivity”, in B. Beemyn & M. Eliason (eds.) Queer Studies: A Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Anthology, New York: New York University Press.

·         Nataf, Zachary I (1996) Lesbians Talk Transgender, London: Scarlett Press.

·         Prosser, Jay (1998) Second Skins: The Body Narratives of Transsexuality, New York: Columbia University Press.

·         Stone, Sandy (1991) “The Empire Strikes Back: A Posttranssexual Manifesto”, in J. Epstein & K. Straub (eds.), Body Guards: The Cultural Politics of Gender Ambiguity, New York: Routledge.

·         Stryker, Susan (2004) ‘Transgender Studies: Queer Theory’s Evil Twin’, GLQ, 10:12.

 

 

Policies and Procedures

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central. Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Academic Honesty Policy http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/academic_honesty/policy.html

Assessment Policy  http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/assessment/policy.html

Grade Appeal Policy http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/gradeappeal/policy.html

Special Consideration Policy http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/special_consideration/policy.html

In addition, a number of other policies can be found in the Learning and Teaching Category of Policy Central.

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of Academic Student Support Services. Details of these services can be accessed at: http://students.mq.edu.au/support/.

UniWISE provides:

  • Online learning resources and academic skills workshops http://www.mq.edu.au/learning_skills/
  • Personal assistance with your learning & study related questions.
  • The Learning Help Desk is located in the Library foyer (level 2).
  • Online and on-campus orientation events run by Mentors@Macquarie.

Student Enquiry Service

Details of these services can be accessed at http://www.student.mq.edu.au/ses/.

Equity Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Support Unit who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

IT Help

If you wish to receive IT help, we would be glad to assist you at http://informatics.mq.edu.au/help/

When using the university's IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use Policy. The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network including students and it outlines what can be done.

Graduate Capabilities

Effective Communication

We want to develop in our students the ability to communicate and convey their views in forms effective with different audiences. We want our graduates to take with them the capability to read, listen, question, gather and evaluate information resources in a variety of formats, assess, write clearly, speak effectively, and to use visual communication and communication technologies as appropriate.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • Students will learn to identify bias and to develop and implement anti-bias strategies that are appropriate to different aspects of their everyday lives - for example, in the home, the workplace, educational settings, and so on.

Assessment tasks

  • Essay 2
  • Tutorial participation

Discipline Specific Knowledge and Skills

Our graduates will take with them the intellectual development, depth and breadth of knowledge, scholarly understanding, and specific subject content in their chosen fields to make them competent and confident in their subject or profession. They will be able to demonstrate, where relevant, professional technical competence and meet professional standards. They will be able to articulate the structure of knowledge of their discipline, be able to adapt discipline-specific knowledge to novel situations, and be able to contribute from their discipline to inter-disciplinary solutions to problems.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Students will learn to critically analyse the ways in which sex, gender, sexuality, and the relations between them, have been discursively constructed in culturally and historically specific ways
  • Students will become familiar with different forms of political activism and will develop skills with which to evaluate particular approaches to the solving of problems
  • Students will learn to identify bias and to develop and implement anti-bias strategies that are appropriate to different aspects of their everyday lives - for example, in the home, the workplace, educational settings, and so on.
  • Students will be introduced to, and learn to effectively implement, cultural studies knowledges and practices

Assessment tasks

  • Take home exam
  • Essay 1
  • Essay 2

Critical, Analytical and Integrative Thinking

We want our graduates to be capable of reasoning, questioning and analysing, and to integrate and synthesise learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments; to be able to critique constraints, assumptions and limitations; to be able to think independently and systemically in relation to scholarly activity, in the workplace, and in the world. We want them to have a level of scientific and information technology literacy.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Students will learn to critically analyse the ways in which sex, gender, sexuality, and the relations between them, have been discursively constructed in culturally and historically specific ways
  • Students will become familiar with different forms of political activism and will develop skills with which to evaluate particular approaches to the solving of problems
  • Students will learn to identify bias and to develop and implement anti-bias strategies that are appropriate to different aspects of their everyday lives - for example, in the home, the workplace, educational settings, and so on.
  • Students will be introduced to, and learn to effectively implement, cultural studies knowledges and practices

Assessment tasks

  • Take home exam
  • Essay 1
  • Essay 2
  • Tutorial participation

Creative and Innovative

Our graduates will also be capable of creative thinking and of creating knowledge. They will be imaginative and open to experience and capable of innovation at work and in the community. We want them to be engaged in applying their critical, creative thinking.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Students will become familiar with different forms of political activism and will develop skills with which to evaluate particular approaches to the solving of problems
  • Students will learn to identify bias and to develop and implement anti-bias strategies that are appropriate to different aspects of their everyday lives - for example, in the home, the workplace, educational settings, and so on.

Assessment task

  • Essay 1

Engaged and Ethical Local and Global citizens

As local citizens our graduates will be aware of indigenous perspectives and of the nation's historical context. They will be engaged with the challenges of contemporary society and with knowledge and ideas. We want our graduates to have respect for diversity, to be open-minded, sensitive to others and inclusive, and to be open to other cultures and perspectives: they should have a level of cultural literacy. Our graduates should be aware of disadvantage and social justice, and be willing to participate to help create a wiser and better society.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Students will become familiar with different forms of political activism and will develop skills with which to evaluate particular approaches to the solving of problems
  • Students will learn to identify bias and to develop and implement anti-bias strategies that are appropriate to different aspects of their everyday lives - for example, in the home, the workplace, educational settings, and so on.
  • Students will be introduced to, and learn to effectively implement, cultural studies knowledges and practices

Assessment tasks

  • Take home exam
  • Essay 1
  • Essay 2
  • Tutorial participation

Socially and Environmentally Active and Responsible

We want our graduates to be aware of and have respect for self and others; to be able to work with others as a leader and a team player; to have a sense of connectedness with others and country; and to have a sense of mutual obligation. Our graduates should be informed and active participants in moving society towards sustainability.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Students will become familiar with different forms of political activism and will develop skills with which to evaluate particular approaches to the solving of problems
  • Students will learn to identify bias and to develop and implement anti-bias strategies that are appropriate to different aspects of their everyday lives - for example, in the home, the workplace, educational settings, and so on.
  • Students will be introduced to, and learn to effectively implement, cultural studies knowledges and practices

Assessment tasks

  • Take home exam
  • Essay 1

Changes since First Published

Date Description
13/07/2012 The Description was updated.
30/01/2012 The Description was updated.
30/01/2012 The Description was updated.