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EDUX106 – Education: The Social and Historical Context

2016 – SP4 OUA

General Information

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Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff On-line facilitator
William LaGanza
Convenor
Anastasia Zarkos
Prerequisites Prerequisites
Corequisites Corequisites
Co-badged status Co-badged status
Unit description Unit description
This unit explores the socio-cultural history of Australian education. The unit explains the ways that education has influenced Australian society and the manner in which Australian society has affected education and teaching. This unit examines each era of education in Australia from the 1780s to present, with focus on the participants and the material taught. As you progress, modern theory will be examined in relation to the welfare state, citizenship, social class, multiculturalism, inclusion and identity. This unit will also examine education markets, higher education and vocational education. You will gain a deeper understanding of contemporary education at the same time building your analytic and research skills. All enrolment queries should be directed to Open Universities Australia (OUA): see www.open.edu.au

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at https://www.open.edu.au/student-admin-and-support/key-dates/

Learning Outcomes

  1. 1. Develop an understanding of the key historical and social issues in Australian education, and identify links to contemporary situations and events
  2. 2. Be able to find relevant information about social and historical events in education from a range of sources including the library, newspapers and electronic sources.
  3. 3. Develop skills in the analysis and critical review of academic and media material, and anticipate how this understanding could be applied
  4. 4. Be able to effectively communicate ideas, and present them in new and creative ways
  5. 5. Be able to work collaboratively and ethically with others

General Assessment Information

Assessment in EDU106 is consistent with University policy, details can be found at http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/assessment/policy.html

There are three assessment tasks for EDU106. You are required to submit the RAL task, the essay, the ACRR task and gain a satisfactory result overall to pass the unit.

I.       RAL (Reviewing Academic Literature) 20%

II.      Essay - Researching educational disadvantage (1,500 words) 40%

III.     ACRR (Artefact Creation and Reflective Report) (Digital artefact creation and 750 words reflective report) 40%

These assessment tasks are designed to encourage understanding of issues in the historical and social contexts of education and to develop skills in research, analysis, writing and collaboration. Assessment also allows the unit staff to gauge what you know and understand, enables them to give you feedback on your performance and, if necessary, feedback on how to improve your performance in future tasks. Written feedback is given on the assessment rubric.

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Due
Reviewing Academic Literature 20% Week 5
Researching disadvantage 40% Week 9
Artefact Creation & Reflection 40% Week 13

Reviewing Academic Literature

Due: Week 5
Weighting: 20%

Submit two one-page reviews (approx. 400 words each) of the following articles:

Connell, R. W. (2013). Why do market ‘reforms’ persistently increase inequality? Discourse: Studies in the Cultural Politics of Education. 34:2, 279-285

Keddie, A. & Williams, N. (2012). Mobilising spaces of agency through genealogies of race and gender: issues of indigeneity, marginality and schooling. Race Ethnicity and Education. 15:3, 291-309

These articles are available in the library’s electronic journal collection.

Rubric assessment items

You will be rated on your ability to:

  • Briefly describe what the piece is about (20%)
  • Identify the author’s line of argument (20%)
  • Explain what information is used and how it has been analyzed to support the argument (20%)
  • Consider the significance and plausibility of these ideas (30%)
  • Demonstrate understanding of academic writing conventions: paragraphing, sentence structure, and spelling (10%)

This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • 1. Develop an understanding of the key historical and social issues in Australian education, and identify links to contemporary situations and events
  • 3. Develop skills in the analysis and critical review of academic and media material, and anticipate how this understanding could be applied

Researching disadvantage

Due: Week 9
Weighting: 40%

Write an essay in which you consider the situation of students disadvantaged by: the low socio-economic status of their family, living a remote of rural location, disability, indigeneity, gender or sexuality, or cultural, ethnic or linguistic background. Comment on how effectively schools, and the education system more generally, prepares these disadvantaged students for employment, further education and training, and life beyond school.

 

Rubric assessment items

You will be rated on your ability to:

  • Locate suitable research material (10%)
  • Use the arguments presented in the academic literature (20%)
  • Examine the impacts of schooling on disadvantaged students (30%)
  • Consider the significance of the arguments presented by the authors of the articles (30%)
  • Demonstrate understanding of academic writing conventions (10%)
    • Paragraphing, sentence structure, and spelling
    • APA style referencing

This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • 1. Develop an understanding of the key historical and social issues in Australian education, and identify links to contemporary situations and events
  • 2. Be able to find relevant information about social and historical events in education from a range of sources including the library, newspapers and electronic sources.
  • 4. Be able to effectively communicate ideas, and present them in new and creative ways

Artefact Creation & Reflection

Due: Week 13
Weighting: 40%

Task

Devise a problem concerning education and either: media, popular culture or technology, and create a digital artefact as a response to that problem. The artefact must be submitted to the unit website. Students must also submit a 750-word report.

Rubric assessment items

For the presentation of the digital artefact you will be rated on your ability to:

  • Devise a suitable ‘driving question’ (10%)
  • Create an engaging digital artefact (20%)
  • Demonstrate understanding of the issue being presented (20%)

For the reflective report you will be rated on your ability to:

  • Consider the significance of the issue presented (20%)
  • Identify what was learnt in doing the task (20%)
  • Demonstrate understanding of academic writing conventions (10%)

This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • 2. Be able to find relevant information about social and historical events in education from a range of sources including the library, newspapers and electronic sources.
  • 3. Develop skills in the analysis and critical review of academic and media material, and anticipate how this understanding could be applied
  • 4. Be able to effectively communicate ideas, and present them in new and creative ways
  • 5. Be able to work collaboratively and ethically with others

Delivery and Resources

The text for the unit is Tait, G. (2016) Making sense of mass education, Cambridge University Press

Unit Schedule

This series of presentations, and the accompanying learning activities, is divided into four modules. The three assessment task submissions largely assess material in each of the sections while the exam questions are drawn from all areas of the unit. The first module presents a traditional sociology of education and the familiar themes of class, race and gender as they relate to education. The second module considers education and governance and presents a more contemporary sociology of education. Here the themes of governance, subjectivity and pre-adulthood are addressed. Both these sections explore the social context of education and issues of social disadvantage in education. The third module deals with cultural context of education and the final module considers philosophy, ethics and law as it relates to education.

 

Module 1. A traditional sociology of education

The unit begins with a framing of education that will be familiar to most, and this is a view established by sociologists of education on a foundation of theories and concerns about matters of class, gender and race.

All weeks of this unit comprise: two lectures, a suggested reading and discussion activities.

Learning activities

The activities below are designed to assist your learning. The lecture presentations will give an overview of the topic or topics. The readings provide detailed information on an aspect of the topic. The learning activities give you the opportunity to explore ideas or put them into practice.

Much of this unit requires you to exercise computer skills, in particular the basic operation of aspects on the iLearn unit web site.

Presentations (lectures)

Listen to the following presentations online (Echo portal on iLearn or on CD).

Week: 1

1          Introduction: Mass education and the sense of it - Dr David Saltmarsh

This presentation provides an introduction to EDUX106.

  • Presentations and on-line discussions
  • Teaching staff
  • Unit website
  • What we will do in lectures
    • Technology to be used
  • Learning objectives, assessment & standards
  • Terminology (mass education, public schooling, etc.)

2          Social class: The rise of mass education - Dr David Saltmarsh

  • Female Orphan School and Macquarie
  • Battle with the churches for control of education
  • Education in 19th century Australia: From social discipline, to citizen right, to arbiter of social privilege

Learning activities

  • Discuss approaches to learning to be used in the unit
    • Using technology
  • Clarify assessment expectations and arrangements
    • Assessment task information in unit outline
    • Submission dates
    • Online submission via Turnitin
  • Understand the unit web site arrangement
    • Links and resources
  • Readings
    • Essential and suggested readings
      • Texts
      • Electronic journal articles and locating them
    • Discussion of Introduction in Tait
      • Traditional and contemporary approaches
      • Tait identifies a number of myths for each topic
    • Reviewing Academic Literature (RAL) and rubric

Essential reading

Tait, G. (2016). Introduction. In Making sense of mass education. Port Melbourne: Cambridge University Press

Week: 2 

3          Social class: Inequality - Dr David Saltmarsh

  • How is inequality determined?
  • How does inequality effect education?
  • Making the Difference

4          Social class: Educational disadvantage - Dr David Saltmarsh

  • Explaining educational disadvantage
    • Critical theorists
    • Bourdieu and capital
  • Review of funding for schooling (Gonski)
  • Critical pedagogy: Researching disadvantage

Learning activities

  • Discuss the myths regarding social class outlined by Tait (2016)
  • Revise locating articles: Connell (2013); Keddie & Williams (2012)
  • How to review academic literature. You might ask yourself the following questions:
    • What is the article about?
    • What is the author’s line of argument?
    • What evidence or information is used to support these claims?
    • How is this information analyzed?
    • Are these findings significant, and if so, why?
    • Do you find the argument plausible?
  • Review the RAL rubric items

Essential readings

Tait, G. (2016). Social class (Chapter 1). In Making sense of mass education. Port Melbourne: Cambridge University Press

Connell, R. W. (2013). Why do market ‘reforms’ persistently increase inequality? Discourse: Studies in the Cultural Politics of Education. 34:2, 279-285

 

Week: 3

5          Social class: Indigenous learners – Dr Neil Harrison

  • Indigenous students: Rural, remote or urban learners?
  • Issues faced by indigenous students in school
  • Teaching about indigenous students

6          Social class: Living outside the metro - Dr Norman McCulla

  • Issues faced by students in rural areas
  • Resource issues in rural areas
  • Teaching in rural areas

Learning activities

  • Discuss draft reviews of Connell (2013)
  • Discuss issues of indigenous education raised by Keddie and Williams (2012)
  • Discuss current events that link with the social class topic

Essential reading

Keddie, A. & Williams, N. (2012). Mobilising spaces of agency through genealogies of race and gender: issues of indigeneity, marginality and schooling. Race Ethnicity and Education. 15:3, 291-309

 

Week: 4

7          Gender: Sex and gender – Ms Anastasia Zarkos

  • Definitions and terminology
  • School provision of services
  • Overview of developments in policy

8          Gender: Gendered schooling - Dr David Saltmarsh

  • Case study
  • Run like a girl (video link)

Learning activities

  • Discuss the myths regarding gender outlined by Tait (2016)
  • Discuss gender issues raised by Keddie and Williams (2012)
  • Discuss current events that link with the gender topic
  • Using library databases to find academic literature

Essential reading

Tait, G. (2016). Gender (Chapter 2). In Making sense of mass education. Port Melbourne: Cambridge University Press

 

Week: 5

Assessment: Submit RAL (Review of Academic Literature)

9          Race/ethnicity: Demographics of NSW education - Dr David Saltmarsh

  • Cultural concentrations
  • Critical race theory
  • Case study

10        Race/ethnicity: Intercultural learners - Dr Robyn Moloney

  • Definitions and terminology
  • School provision of services
  • Overview of developments in policy

Learning activities

  • Discuss the myths regarding race and ethnicity outlined by Tait (2016)
  • Discuss current events that link with the race and ethnicity topic
  • Developing an argument in an essay

Essential reading

Tait, G. (2016). Race/ethnicity (Chapter 3). In Making sense of mass education. Port Melbourne: Cambridge University Press

 

Week: 6

Module 2. Education and governance: A contemporary sociology

Due to a number of factors, globalization and the emergence of certain technologies to name two, a focus on class, gender and race no longer adequately explains social disadvantage or inequality. Consequently,an alterative way of understanding the context of education is offered.

11        Governance: Governing subjects - Dr David Saltmarsh

Possible topics:

  • The notion of governance
  • Implications for schooling

12        Governance: Focusing on equality - Dr David Saltmarsh

Possible topics:

  • Case study: Education in Finland

Learning activities

  • Discuss the myths regarding governance outlined by Tait (2016)
  • Discuss current events that link with the governance topic
  • Critical pedagogy

Essential reading

Tait, G. (2016). Governance (Chapter 4). In Making sense of mass education. Port Melbourne: Cambridge University Press

 

Week: 7

13        Subjectivity: The subjects of education - Dr Norman McCulla

Possible topics:

  • The notion of subjectivity
  • Implications for schooling

14        Subjectivity: Disability and inclusion - Dr Anne McMaugh

  • Definitions of ability
  • School provision of services
  • Overview of developments in policy

Learning activities

  • Discuss the myths regarding subjectivity outlined by Tait (2016)
  • Discuss current events that link with the disability topic
  • Project-based learning overview

Essential reading

Tait, G. (2016). Subjectivity (Chapter 5). In Making sense of mass education. Port Melbourne: Cambridge University Press

 

Week: 8

15        Pre-adulthood: Visions of childhood - Dr David Saltmarsh

  • Definitions and terminology
  • School provision of services
  • Overview of developments in policy

Learning activities

  • Discuss the myths regarding pre-adulthood outlined by Tait
  • ACRR task:
    • Decide a presentation topic
    • Perform a skills audit

Essential reading

Tait, G. (2016). Pre-adulthood (Chapter 6). In Making sense of mass education. Port Melbourne: Cambridge University Press

 

Week: 9

Assessment: Submit essay

Module 3. Cultural context of education

Cultural elements play a significant role in people’s lives, and consequently in their understanding of the society and communities they inhabit. These cultural elements inevitably influence education.

16        Media: Media literacy - Dr Norman McCulla

  • Definitions and terminology
  • School provision of services
  • Overview of developments in policy

17        Media: School communities - Dr David Saltmarsh

  • Case study: ‘Reflections from the riot zone’
  • Representations of teachers in the media

Learning activities

  • Discuss the myths regarding the media outlined by Tait (2016)
  • Discuss possible 'driving questions' for ACRR

Essential reading

Tait, G. (2016). The media (Chapter 8). In Making sense of mass education. Port Melbourne: Cambridge University Press

 

Week: 10

18        Popular culture: Movie lessons - Dr David Saltmarsh

  • Popular culture and education
  • Representations of schools in movies
  • Authenticity and fantasy

19        Popular culture: Culture in the classroom - Dr Norman McCulla

  • Theories of culture
  • Youth culture

Learning activities

  • Discuss the myths regarding popular culture outlined by Tait (2016)

Essential reading

Tait, G. (2016). Popular culture (Chapter 9). In Making sense of mass education. Port Melbourne: Cambridge University Press

 

Week: 11

20        Technology: Social media – Mr Dean Groom

  • Definitions and terminology
  • School provision of services
  • Overview of developments in policy

21        Technology: Mobile learning – Mr Dean Groom

  • Definitions and terminology
  • School provision of services
  • Overview of developments in policy

Learning activities

  • Discuss the myths regarding technology outlined by Tait (2016)

Essential reading

Tait, G. (2016). Technology (Chapter 10). In Making sense of mass education. Port Melbourne: Cambridge University Press

 

Week: 12

Module 4. Philosophy, ethics, the law and education

In the final module we reflect on a number of issues about the ways that schooling is organized and how actors work within these arrangements.

22        Philosophy: Teachers and pedagogy - Dr Norman McCulla

  • Definitions and terminology
  • School provision of services
  • Overview of developments in policy

 

23        Ethics and law: Teachers as professionals - Dr Norman McCulla

  • Definitions and terminology
  • School provision of services
  • Overview of developments in policy

Learning activities

  • Discuss the myths regarding ethics and law outlined by Tait (2016)

Essential reading

Tait, G. (2016). Ethics and law (Chapter 13). In Making sense of mass education. Port Melbourne: Cambridge University Press

 

Week: 13

Assessment: Submit ACRR digital artefact and report

24        Truth: The global reach - Dr Lien Pham

  • Definitions and terminology
  • School provision of services
  • Overview of developments in policy

25        Reflection and review - Dr David Saltmarsh

Finally, a review of the entire unit.

Learning activities

  • Discuss the myths regarding truth and post-colonialism outlined by Tait (2016)

Essential reading

Tait, G. (2016). Truth and post-colonialism (Chapter 14). In Making sense of mass education. Port Melbourne: Cambridge University Press

Policies and Procedures

Late Submission - applies unless otherwise stated elsewhere in the unit guide

Unless a Special Consideration request has been submitted and approved, (a) a penalty for lateness will apply – two (2) marks out of 100 will be deducted per day for assignments submitted after the due date – and (b) no assignment will be accepted more than seven (7) days (incl. weekends) after the original submission deadline. No late submissions will be accepted for timed assessments – e.g. quizzes, online tests.

Extension Request

Special Consideration Policy and Procedure (https://staff.mq.edu.au/work/strategy-planning-and-governance/university-policies-and-procedures/policies/special-consideration)

The University recognises that students may experience events or conditions that adversely affect their academic performance. If you experience serious and unavoidable difficulties at exam time or when assessment tasks are due, you can consider applying for Special Consideration.

You need to show that the circumstances:

  1. were serious, unexpected and unavoidable
  2. were beyond your control
  3. caused substantial disruption to your academic work
  4. substantially interfered with your otherwise satisfactory fulfilment of the unit requirements
  5. lasted at least three consecutive days or a total of 5 days within the teaching period and prevented completion of an assessment task scheduled for a specific date.

If you feel that your studies have been impacted submit an application as follows:

  1. Visit Ask MQ and use your OneID to log in
  2. Fill in your relevant details
  3. Attach supporting documents by clicking 'Add a reply', click 'Browse' and navigating to the files you want to attach, then click 'Submit Form' to send your notification and supporting documents
  4. Please keep copies of your original documents, as they may be requested in the future as part of the assessment process

Outcome

Once your submission is assessed, an appropriate outcome will be organised.

OUA Specific Policies and Procedures

Withdrawal from a unit after the census date

You can withdraw from your subjects prior to the census date (last day to withdraw). If you successfully withdraw before the census date, you won’t need to apply for Special Circumstances. If you find yourself unable to withdraw from your subjects before the census date - you might be able to apply for Special Circumstances. If you’re eligible, we can refund your fees and overturn your fail grade.

If you’re studying Single Subjects using FEE-HELP or paying up front, you can apply online.

If you’re studying a degree using HECS-HELP, you’ll need to apply directly to Macquarie University.

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central. Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Academic Honesty Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/academic_honesty/policy.html

New Assessment Policy in effect from Session 2 2016 http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/assessment/policy_2016.html. For more information visit http://students.mq.edu.au/events/2016/07/19/new_assessment_policy_in_place_from_session_2/

Assessment Policy prior to Session 2 2016 http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/assessment/policy.html

Grading Policy prior to Session 2 2016 http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/grading/policy.html

Grade Appeal Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/gradeappeal/policy.html

Complaint Management Procedure for Students and Members of the Public http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/complaint_management/procedure.html​

Disruption to Studies Policy http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/disruption_studies/policy.html The Disruption to Studies Policy is effective from March 3 2014 and replaces the Special Consideration Policy.

In addition, a number of other policies can be found in the Learning and Teaching Category of Policy Central.

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/support/student_conduct/

Results

Results shown in iLearn, or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent. For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au.

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Learning Skills

Learning Skills (mq.edu.au/learningskills) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to improve your marks and take control of your study.

Student Enquiry Service

For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at ask.mq.edu.au

Equity Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

IT Help

For help with University computer systems and technology, visit http://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/information_technology/help/

When using the University's IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use of IT Resources Policy. The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network including students.

Graduate Capabilities

Problem Solving and Research Capability

Our graduates should be capable of researching; of analysing, and interpreting and assessing data and information in various forms; of drawing connections across fields of knowledge; and they should be able to relate their knowledge to complex situations at work or in the world, in order to diagnose and solve problems. We want them to have the confidence to take the initiative in doing so, within an awareness of their own limitations.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • 2. Be able to find relevant information about social and historical events in education from a range of sources including the library, newspapers and electronic sources.
  • 3. Develop skills in the analysis and critical review of academic and media material, and anticipate how this understanding could be applied

Assessment tasks

  • Reviewing Academic Literature
  • Researching disadvantage
  • Artefact Creation & Reflection

Effective Communication

We want to develop in our students the ability to communicate and convey their views in forms effective with different audiences. We want our graduates to take with them the capability to read, listen, question, gather and evaluate information resources in a variety of formats, assess, write clearly, speak effectively, and to use visual communication and communication technologies as appropriate.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • 5. Be able to work collaboratively and ethically with others

Assessment tasks

  • Reviewing Academic Literature
  • Artefact Creation & Reflection

Discipline Specific Knowledge and Skills

Our graduates will take with them the intellectual development, depth and breadth of knowledge, scholarly understanding, and specific subject content in their chosen fields to make them competent and confident in their subject or profession. They will be able to demonstrate, where relevant, professional technical competence and meet professional standards. They will be able to articulate the structure of knowledge of their discipline, be able to adapt discipline-specific knowledge to novel situations, and be able to contribute from their discipline to inter-disciplinary solutions to problems.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • 1. Develop an understanding of the key historical and social issues in Australian education, and identify links to contemporary situations and events
  • 2. Be able to find relevant information about social and historical events in education from a range of sources including the library, newspapers and electronic sources.

Assessment tasks

  • Reviewing Academic Literature
  • Researching disadvantage
  • Artefact Creation & Reflection

Critical, Analytical and Integrative Thinking

We want our graduates to be capable of reasoning, questioning and analysing, and to integrate and synthesise learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments; to be able to critique constraints, assumptions and limitations; to be able to think independently and systemically in relation to scholarly activity, in the workplace, and in the world. We want them to have a level of scientific and information technology literacy.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • 1. Develop an understanding of the key historical and social issues in Australian education, and identify links to contemporary situations and events
  • 3. Develop skills in the analysis and critical review of academic and media material, and anticipate how this understanding could be applied

Assessment tasks

  • Reviewing Academic Literature
  • Researching disadvantage
  • Artefact Creation & Reflection

Creative and Innovative

Our graduates will also be capable of creative thinking and of creating knowledge. They will be imaginative and open to experience and capable of innovation at work and in the community. We want them to be engaged in applying their critical, creative thinking.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • 4. Be able to effectively communicate ideas, and present them in new and creative ways

Assessment task

  • Artefact Creation & Reflection

Engaged and Ethical Local and Global citizens

As local citizens our graduates will be aware of indigenous perspectives and of the nation's historical context. They will be engaged with the challenges of contemporary society and with knowledge and ideas. We want our graduates to have respect for diversity, to be open-minded, sensitive to others and inclusive, and to be open to other cultures and perspectives: they should have a level of cultural literacy. Our graduates should be aware of disadvantage and social justice, and be willing to participate to help create a wiser and better society.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Assessment tasks

  • Researching disadvantage
  • Artefact Creation & Reflection

Socially and Environmentally Active and Responsible

We want our graduates to be aware of and have respect for self and others; to be able to work with others as a leader and a team player; to have a sense of connectedness with others and country; and to have a sense of mutual obligation. Our graduates should be informed and active participants in moving society towards sustainability.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Assessment task

  • Researching disadvantage

Capable of Professional and Personal Judgement and Initiative

We want our graduates to have emotional intelligence and sound interpersonal skills and to demonstrate discernment and common sense in their professional and personal judgement. They will exercise initiative as needed. They will be capable of risk assessment, and be able to handle ambiguity and complexity, enabling them to be adaptable in diverse and changing environments.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • 3. Develop skills in the analysis and critical review of academic and media material, and anticipate how this understanding could be applied

Changes since First Published

Date Description
24/11/2016 Updating unit schedule and learning activities
21/11/2016 Updated unit text and minor changes to lecture outline.