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MHIS301 – Indigenous-Settler Histories: Comparative Contexts

2018 – S2 Day

General Information

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Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff
Alison Holland
Credit points Credit points
3
Prerequisites Prerequisites
6cp at 200 level
Corequisites Corequisites
Co-badged status Co-badged status
Unit description Unit description
European colonisation of the globe is one of the most important stories of world history. It defined and shaped colonised and coloniser and left legacies which are still being felt today, even in the stories nations tell about themselves. MHIS301 charts key aspects of this history in global comparative frame focussing on Australia, North America, Canada, New Zealand and South Africa. Using a range of historical sources including documentary and archives, as well as rich web-based resources, the unit explores issues such as contact, resistance and cultural adaptation and the contemporary politics of rights, reparation and memory. It recovers Indigenous historical experience.

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at https://students.mq.edu.au/important-dates

Learning Outcomes

  1. 1. Understand settler colonialism as a structure in world history.
  2. 2. Compare models, practices and outcomes of settler-colonialism in different geographical and temporal frames.
  3. 3. Understand Indigenous historical experience in these contexts.
  4. 4. Develop Critical and Analytical research skills through analysis of primary and secondary sources.
  5. 5. Develop integrative and creative thinking and problem solving skills via formulating research question
  6. 7. Appreciate legacies of settler-colonialism in contemporary contexts.
  7. 6. Develop effective written and oral communication

General Assessment Information

All assessments for this unit are clearly identified and instructions laid out in iLearn. Please consult the iLearn homepage and take the time to scroll through it, paying particular attention to the dedicated section on Assessment.

 Late Submission Penalty

“Unless a Special Consideration request has been submitted and approved, (a) a penalty for lateness will apply – two (2) marks out of 100 will be deducted per day for assignments submitted after the due date – and (b) no assignment will be accepted more than seven (7) days (incl. weekends) after the original submission deadline. 

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Hurdle Due
Primary Source Task 10% No Friday, 24 August
Secondary Source Task 20% No Friday, 7th September
Presentation 10% No Either 18th or 25th October
Research Essay 50% No Friday, 2nd November
Participation 10% No Across semester

Primary Source Task

Due: Friday, 24 August
Weighting: 10%

After reading the document ‘Choosing and Preparing your MHIS301 Research Project’ and having selected your primary source base for the research essay you are to write a primary source report.

This task is getting you to reflect on your primary source and to think critically about it. It is both a description of the source/s and a reflection on its historical relevance. A key component of this task is to develop a research question. This question might change in the course of completing the research essay. However, it is important to start the process sooner rather than later.

Part 1: You should consider the following things:

  1. What is it?
  2. Who created it and why?
  3. When and where was it created?
  4. What was the audience?
  5. What can we determine about the historical period and /or topic?
  6. Limitations (what can’t we know by looking at the source on its own)?
  7. What questions does it raise?

Part 2: Compose an historical question.

NB. Where possible include a link or image of the source/s when you submit this task via turnitin.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • 3. Understand Indigenous historical experience in these contexts.
  • 4. Develop Critical and Analytical research skills through analysis of primary and secondary sources.
  • 5. Develop integrative and creative thinking and problem solving skills via formulating research question
  • 6. Develop effective written and oral communication

Secondary Source Task

Due: Friday, 7th September
Weighting: 20%

You are to write an annotated bibliography focussing on 5 key works. An annotated bibliography is a list of books, articles, documents that you have found which are going to be useful to your research project. The purpose is to inform the reader about the relevance of the works to your project and should identify the key argument/s and why or how they relate to and help inform your question. You have up to 1250 words, which is roughly 250 words per book.

You can use either book chapters or journal articles but your bibliography must include one complete book.

Below are a list of useful resources for writing an annotated bibliography. As the University of Cornell suggests, doing this task is all about concise exposition, succinct analysis and informed library research. It is also about you understanding your historiographical base.

References for Annotated Bibliographies

https://student.unsw.edu.au/annotated-bibliography

http://guides.library.cornell.edu/annotatedbibliography

https://www.une.edu.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0008/11132/WE_Writing-an-annotated-bibliography.pdf

 

 


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • 3. Understand Indigenous historical experience in these contexts.
  • 4. Develop Critical and Analytical research skills through analysis of primary and secondary sources.
  • 6. Develop effective written and oral communication

Presentation

Due: Either 18th or 25th October
Weighting: 10%

Each student is to do a 5-minute presentation to the class about one key piece of evidence used in their research. This will involve briefly outlining the topic and identifying the leading research question. You can consider the following:

  • What is your evidence and why is it significant?
  • How did you come across it and why is it of interest to you?
  • What it reveals to you.
  • What other sources it relates to or sheds light on.
  • What questions did it raise for you?

You will be assessed on your ability to present clearly and engagingly, and your ability to edit content to the required timeframe. This assessment task is designed to assess your oral communication skills, and your ability to organise and deliver information in non-written formats.

As you are all working on different subjects, this will be a wonderful opportunity to hear about everyone’s discoveries and special interests. You should use a presentation tool like PowerPoint, Keynote or Prezi to deliver your presentation. You will be expected to be able to answer audience questions afterwards.

External Students (including OUA Students)

All external students will do a presentation. You can upload your presentation (either as powerpoint or prezi, etc,) into the discussion forum or we can organise presentations via zoom. All instructions for using zoom will be found on the iLearn homepage.

 


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • 3. Understand Indigenous historical experience in these contexts.
  • 4. Develop Critical and Analytical research skills through analysis of primary and secondary sources.
  • 6. Develop effective written and oral communication

Research Essay

Due: Friday, 2nd November
Weighting: 50%

You are to write a 2500-3000 word research essay on your chosen topic/question/source. This should include between 10-15 references (as a minimum). Your chosen primary source should feature in the essay.

Format

Submit essay via turnitin link on iLearn and include the following:

  • The essay question
  • 1.5 spacing
  • Page numbers
  •  
  • Referencing – please note, only footnotes will be accepted.

Check Guide to Essay writing link on iLearn and proof-read your essay before submission.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • 1. Understand settler colonialism as a structure in world history.
  • 2. Compare models, practices and outcomes of settler-colonialism in different geographical and temporal frames.
  • 3. Understand Indigenous historical experience in these contexts.
  • 5. Develop integrative and creative thinking and problem solving skills via formulating research question
  • 7. Appreciate legacies of settler-colonialism in contemporary contexts.
  • 6. Develop effective written and oral communication

Participation

Due: Across semester
Weighting: 10%

The seminars for this unit are set around a different theme each week. There are compulsory set readings which every student must read every week and be prepared to come to class (internal students) or contribute to online discussions (external students). There will be a link directly to the readings on the iLearn site (Leganto) so there can't be any excuses for not having done the readings. Contributing to class discussions may include offering views and interpretations to questions, working in groups to develop group responses to either a reading or an activity, leading discussion (where required), listening and responding  either to the convenor or peers in a respectful, collaborative and co-operative manner and sharing ideas.

Your contributions will be cumulative and you will be assessed on your overall contributions to all aspects of the seminar. Engagement and commitment is vital.

External Students (including OUA students)

The same applies for external students in this unit. However, instead of participating in class, you will be required to participate, each week, in discussions on the online discussion forum.

Seminar attendance and participation is compulsory. In the case of sickness or misadventure, a medical certificate is required.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • 1. Understand settler colonialism as a structure in world history.
  • 2. Compare models, practices and outcomes of settler-colonialism in different geographical and temporal frames.
  • 3. Understand Indigenous historical experience in these contexts.
  • 5. Develop integrative and creative thinking and problem solving skills via formulating research question
  • 7. Appreciate legacies of settler-colonialism in contemporary contexts.
  • 6. Develop effective written and oral communication

Delivery and Resources

This unit consists of 1 x 1 hr lecture and 1 x 2 hr seminar.

Lecture: Thursday 12 -1, 23 Wallys Walk, 204 Tutorial Room

Seminar: Thursday 2-4, 4 Western Road, 210 Tutorial Room

The unit has an online presence in iLearn. You will need access to a reliable computer and broadband internet. The iLearn site is comprehensive and includes links to a variety of online resources.

Compulsory readings will be available via a link in iLearn (Leganto Reading Lists). Once you click on this it will take you directly to the online reading each week.

There will be a library research training session (in the library) in the second week of seminars. Time and location TBA.

Important Information for All External Students

The unit convenor understands the challenges and difficulties of studying in external mode. Discussions around weekly topics will occur via the online discussion forum which many of you are probably already familiar with. Given the way this unit is scaffolded in terms of the assessment tasks and given the fact that it is centred around a research project that is self-selecting, she is concerned to create a space where external students and her can discuss the issues and challenges of the unit. To facilitate this the web conferencing app, Zoom, will be used. All external students are advised to download this (free) app. The convenor will provide a set of dates and meeting times at the beginning of semester. Hopefully, all external students can get to one of these. This will be an introductory meet and greet and where you can ask any questions about the unit, content, assessments, etc. The convenor will consider creating more online meetings as the need arises.

Please be advised that all the details and instructions around zoom will be up on iLearn under the 'Assessment' tab. Please consult it.

 

 

Unit Schedule

Week Date Lecture Seminar
1 30 July-3 August Introduction Introduction and Pre-Colonial Societies
2 6-10 August Empire Settler Colonialism + Library visit
3 13-17 August Frontier War Contact and Collision
4 20-24 August Disease Frontier Wars
5 27-31 August Treaties Law and Sovereignty
6 3-7 September Doomed Race Cultural Accommodation
7 10-14 September Civil Rights Science
8 1-5 October Humanitarian Conscience Intimate Frontiers
9 8-12 October Assimilation Defending Rights
10 15-19 October The 60s Revolution Assimilation
11 22-26 October Land Black Power and Consciousness
12 29 October-2 November Repatriation Sovereignty
13 5-9 November Truth and Reconciliation Indigenous Societies Today

 

Policies and Procedures

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central (https://staff.mq.edu.au/work/strategy-planning-and-governance/university-policies-and-procedures/policy-central). Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Undergraduate students seeking more policy resources can visit the Student Policy Gateway (https://students.mq.edu.au/support/study/student-policy-gateway). It is your one-stop-shop for the key policies you need to know about throughout your undergraduate student journey.

If you would like to see all the policies relevant to Learning and Teaching visit Policy Central (https://staff.mq.edu.au/work/strategy-planning-and-governance/university-policies-and-procedures/policy-central).

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/study/getting-started/student-conduct​

Results

Results shown in iLearn, or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent. For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au.

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Learning Skills

Learning Skills (mq.edu.au/learningskills) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to improve your marks and take control of your study.

Student Enquiry Service

For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at ask.mq.edu.au

Equity Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

IT Help

For help with University computer systems and technology, visit http://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/information_technology/help/

When using the University's IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use of IT Resources Policy. The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network including students.

Graduate Capabilities

Problem Solving and Research Capability

Our graduates should be capable of researching; of analysing, and interpreting and assessing data and information in various forms; of drawing connections across fields of knowledge; and they should be able to relate their knowledge to complex situations at work or in the world, in order to diagnose and solve problems. We want them to have the confidence to take the initiative in doing so, within an awareness of their own limitations.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • 2. Compare models, practices and outcomes of settler-colonialism in different geographical and temporal frames.
  • 4. Develop Critical and Analytical research skills through analysis of primary and secondary sources.
  • 5. Develop integrative and creative thinking and problem solving skills via formulating research question

Assessment tasks

  • Primary Source Task
  • Secondary Source Task
  • Presentation
  • Research Essay
  • Participation

Effective Communication

We want to develop in our students the ability to communicate and convey their views in forms effective with different audiences. We want our graduates to take with them the capability to read, listen, question, gather and evaluate information resources in a variety of formats, assess, write clearly, speak effectively, and to use visual communication and communication technologies as appropriate.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • 4. Develop Critical and Analytical research skills through analysis of primary and secondary sources.
  • 5. Develop integrative and creative thinking and problem solving skills via formulating research question
  • 6. Develop effective written and oral communication

Assessment tasks

  • Primary Source Task
  • Secondary Source Task
  • Presentation
  • Research Essay
  • Participation

Capable of Professional and Personal Judgement and Initiative

We want our graduates to have emotional intelligence and sound interpersonal skills and to demonstrate discernment and common sense in their professional and personal judgement. They will exercise initiative as needed. They will be capable of risk assessment, and be able to handle ambiguity and complexity, enabling them to be adaptable in diverse and changing environments.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • 5. Develop integrative and creative thinking and problem solving skills via formulating research question

Assessment tasks

  • Primary Source Task
  • Research Essay
  • Participation

Discipline Specific Knowledge and Skills

Our graduates will take with them the intellectual development, depth and breadth of knowledge, scholarly understanding, and specific subject content in their chosen fields to make them competent and confident in their subject or profession. They will be able to demonstrate, where relevant, professional technical competence and meet professional standards. They will be able to articulate the structure of knowledge of their discipline, be able to adapt discipline-specific knowledge to novel situations, and be able to contribute from their discipline to inter-disciplinary solutions to problems.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • 1. Understand settler colonialism as a structure in world history.
  • 2. Compare models, practices and outcomes of settler-colonialism in different geographical and temporal frames.
  • 3. Understand Indigenous historical experience in these contexts.
  • 4. Develop Critical and Analytical research skills through analysis of primary and secondary sources.
  • 5. Develop integrative and creative thinking and problem solving skills via formulating research question
  • 7. Appreciate legacies of settler-colonialism in contemporary contexts.

Assessment tasks

  • Primary Source Task
  • Secondary Source Task
  • Presentation
  • Research Essay
  • Participation

Critical, Analytical and Integrative Thinking

We want our graduates to be capable of reasoning, questioning and analysing, and to integrate and synthesise learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments; to be able to critique constraints, assumptions and limitations; to be able to think independently and systemically in relation to scholarly activity, in the workplace, and in the world. We want them to have a level of scientific and information technology literacy.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • 2. Compare models, practices and outcomes of settler-colonialism in different geographical and temporal frames.
  • 4. Develop Critical and Analytical research skills through analysis of primary and secondary sources.
  • 5. Develop integrative and creative thinking and problem solving skills via formulating research question
  • 7. Appreciate legacies of settler-colonialism in contemporary contexts.

Assessment tasks

  • Primary Source Task
  • Secondary Source Task
  • Presentation
  • Research Essay
  • Participation

Creative and Innovative

Our graduates will also be capable of creative thinking and of creating knowledge. They will be imaginative and open to experience and capable of innovation at work and in the community. We want them to be engaged in applying their critical, creative thinking.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • 4. Develop Critical and Analytical research skills through analysis of primary and secondary sources.
  • 5. Develop integrative and creative thinking and problem solving skills via formulating research question

Assessment tasks

  • Primary Source Task
  • Secondary Source Task
  • Presentation
  • Research Essay
  • Participation

Engaged and Ethical Local and Global citizens

As local citizens our graduates will be aware of indigenous perspectives and of the nation's historical context. They will be engaged with the challenges of contemporary society and with knowledge and ideas. We want our graduates to have respect for diversity, to be open-minded, sensitive to others and inclusive, and to be open to other cultures and perspectives: they should have a level of cultural literacy. Our graduates should be aware of disadvantage and social justice, and be willing to participate to help create a wiser and better society.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • 1. Understand settler colonialism as a structure in world history.
  • 2. Compare models, practices and outcomes of settler-colonialism in different geographical and temporal frames.
  • 3. Understand Indigenous historical experience in these contexts.
  • 7. Appreciate legacies of settler-colonialism in contemporary contexts.

Assessment tasks

  • Primary Source Task
  • Secondary Source Task
  • Presentation
  • Research Essay
  • Participation

Socially and Environmentally Active and Responsible

We want our graduates to be aware of and have respect for self and others; to be able to work with others as a leader and a team player; to have a sense of connectedness with others and country; and to have a sense of mutual obligation. Our graduates should be informed and active participants in moving society towards sustainability.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • 1. Understand settler colonialism as a structure in world history.
  • 2. Compare models, practices and outcomes of settler-colonialism in different geographical and temporal frames.

Assessment tasks

  • Research Essay
  • Participation

Commitment to Continuous Learning

Our graduates will have enquiring minds and a literate curiosity which will lead them to pursue knowledge for its own sake. They will continue to pursue learning in their careers and as they participate in the world. They will be capable of reflecting on their experiences and relationships with others and the environment, learning from them, and growing - personally, professionally and socially.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • 3. Understand Indigenous historical experience in these contexts.
  • 7. Appreciate legacies of settler-colonialism in contemporary contexts.

Assessment tasks

  • Primary Source Task
  • Secondary Source Task
  • Presentation
  • Research Essay
  • Participation

Changes since First Published

Date Description
14/06/2018 I added some detail into the 'Delivery and Resources' section principally for external students because I am teaching it in OUA for the first time and this has implications in terms of assessments. I also joined the internal and external unit guides.
11/06/2018 Changes have been made in the assessment section. They include changing the word limit on the research essay from 4000 words to 2500-3000 words. There have also been some instructions added for external (including OUA) students.