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MHIS220 – Twentieth-Century Europe

2018 – S2 Day

General Information

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Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff
Keith Rathbone
Credit points Credit points
3
Prerequisites Prerequisites
12cp at 100 level or above or (3cp in HIST or MHIS or POL units)
Corequisites Corequisites
Co-badged status Co-badged status
Unit description Unit description
Beginning with the First World War, this unit offers a political, social, cultural and economic overview of Europe's relations with the wider world. It traces the obsession with race and empire in Britain, France, Germany and Italy, and considers the post-colonial view that the twentieth century European civil wars were a result of European practices of colonialism turned inward. Was Europe indeed the 'dark continent' suggested by historian Mark Mazower? The crisis of European liberalism in the face of the Great Depression, Russian communism, the Spanish Civil War, fascism and Nazism, two world wars and the Holocaust support such a view, but the second half the century presents a more complicated picture. We look at the Cold War; the Americanisation of Europe and the fall of communism; the effects of decolonisation and post-colonial immigration on European societies; the breakdown of the postwar consensus and the rise of Islamist terrorism in the late twentieth century Europe.

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at https://students.mq.edu.au/important-dates

Learning Outcomes

  1. Demonstrate an understanding of European history in the twentieth century.
  2. Demonstrate an understanding of a variety of conceptual and historiographical approaches to interpreting twentieth-century European history.
  3. Sensitively contribute to contemporary debates about Europe and the world with an informed and critical understanding of the relationship between past and present.
  4. Identify and interpret a wide variety of secondary and primary materials.
  5. Examine historical issues by undertaking research according to the methodological and ethical conventions of the discipline.
  6. Analyse historical evidence, scholarship and changing representations of the past.
  7. Construct an evidence-based argument or narrative in audio, digital, oral, visual, or written form.
  8. Identify and reflect critically on the knowledge and skills developed in their study of history.

General Assessment Information

Assignment submission

Double-spaced type and pages with wide margins (for comments) are preferred. Footnotes and bibliography are mandatory.

All assignments (except for the exam) must be submitted as Word documents via Turnitin on the MHIS220 iLearn site:

  1. Log in to your iLearn account and go to your home page. Turnitin assignments should be visible under MHIS220.
  2. If not, log in to MHIS220 and scroll down until you reach the subheading for the week.  ‘Assignment details and submission via Turnitin should be visible in that week. 
  3. Click on the assignment title.
  4. Type the title of your assignment in the box ‘Submission Title’.
  5. To upload your Word document, click on ‘Browse’ next to the ‘File to Submit’ box. Find and select your document from your computer, check the box for copyright, then click on the ‘Add submission’ button.

 

Detailed instructions on how to use Turnitin with can be found at:

http://www.mq.edu.au/iLearn/student_info/assignments.htm#submit_turnitin

 

Feedback will be provided via Grademark. Go to the following URL for instructions on how to view your feedback:

http://www.mq.edu.au/iLearn/student_info/assignments.htm#results

 

Extensions and penalties

Unless a Special Consideration request has been submitted and approved, (a) a penalty for lateness will apply – two (2) marks out of 100 will be deducted per day for assignments submitted after the due date – and (b) no assignment will be accepted more than seven (7) days (incl. weekends) after the original submission deadline. No late submissions will be accepted for timed assessments – e.g. quizzes, online tests.

Assignments handed in early will not be marked and returned before the due date.

Always keep a copy of your assessment tasks in case they get lost in the system.

 

Returning assignments

Assignments will be returned online via the MHIS220 iLearn site. For more information on how to view your marked assignments, see: http://www.mq.edu.au/iLearn/student_info/assignments.htm#results

Assignments will be marked and returned within two weeks of receipt.

 

Other information

Disruption to Studies

No work will be accepted for marking after the final paper deadline unless you have submitted a request for Disruption to Studies with adequate and appropriate supporting evidence. 

Please note that requests for disruption to studies are not granted automatically, and are reserved for unforeseen and serious circumstances such as prolonged illness, hospitalisation or bereavement in your immediate family. If you believe that you qualify for special consideration, please contact Dr Teo as soon as possible.

 

Attendance

Attendance at seminars is compulsory. Failure to meet these requirements may result in failure of the unit. All students are expected to make adequate preparation for each seminar, which includes completing the recommended readings before their tutorial. Attendance and participation in seminar discussions are worth 20% of the total mark for this unit.  Failure to attend or participate in at least 70% of the seminars will result in a Fail grade for the entire course. Failure to complete a report for at least 70% of the weekly readings will result in a Fail grade for the entire course.

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Hurdle Due
Participation 10% No Each Week
Report on Readings 10% No Each Week
Project Proposal 5% No Week 2
Annotated Bibliography 10% No Week 5
Primary Source Analysis 15% No Week 7
Secondary Source Analysis 15% No Week 9
Research Paper 35% No Week 13

Participation

Due: Each Week
Weighting: 10%

Pass rate: students must attend at least 70% of seminar to pass this course.

Students are expected to participate in and lead seminar discussions throughout the semester. They should come to seminars prepared to share their ideas about the readings and questions that these may have raised, as well as resources relating to the readings that they have discovered.

The aim of this task is to assess your oral and written communication skills and your ability to work with others.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Demonstrate an understanding of European history in the twentieth century.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of a variety of conceptual and historiographical approaches to interpreting twentieth-century European history.
  • Sensitively contribute to contemporary debates about Europe and the world with an informed and critical understanding of the relationship between past and present.
  • Identify and interpret a wide variety of secondary and primary materials.
  • Analyse historical evidence, scholarship and changing representations of the past.
  • Identify and reflect critically on the knowledge and skills developed in their study of history.

Report on Readings

Due: Each Week
Weighting: 10%

Pass rate: students must complete at least 70% of reading reports to pass this course

Students are expected to respond to the readings on iLearn. Student responses should be approximately 200-300 words long (i.e. usually one page in total for each tutorial/seminar). Each response should explain:

1.  What is (one of) the reading(s) about?

2.  What is the argument presented? (i.e. How does the historian explain the cause, effects or consequences, or significance of the topic?) What evidence and reasoning support this argument?  Do you find that argument convincing?  Why or why not?

3.  Propose two questions for class consideration. 

Reports on the readings will be checked weekly by me or your group leader for that week.

The aim of this task is to ensure that students have done the weekly readings and come to seminars adequately prepared to participate in class discussions. It will also enable me to check that students have understood the readings and the topics.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Demonstrate an understanding of European history in the twentieth century.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of a variety of conceptual and historiographical approaches to interpreting twentieth-century European history.
  • Sensitively contribute to contemporary debates about Europe and the world with an informed and critical understanding of the relationship between past and present.
  • Identify and interpret a wide variety of secondary and primary materials.
  • Examine historical issues by undertaking research according to the methodological and ethical conventions of the discipline.
  • Analyse historical evidence, scholarship and changing representations of the past.
  • Construct an evidence-based argument or narrative in audio, digital, oral, visual, or written form.
  • Identify and reflect critically on the knowledge and skills developed in their study of history.

Project Proposal

Due: Week 2
Weighting: 5%

This constitutes Part 1 of the Research Project

Word length: approximately 500 words, excluding bibliography

See MHIS220 iLearn site for marking rubrics.

Design a research essay question focusing on any topic in 20th century European history.

1. The essay question you have designed. This must be a specific question rather than a nondescript or vague topic.

2. Make sure you answer the following questions:

What is my topic about?

Who are the some important historians in this field?

What are there other themes or issues I need to understand in order to explore this topic properly?

This task which assesses whether students have understood the history of the topic; shown good judgement in the kinds of historical primary and secondary sources required for 200-level university history essay; and understood how and why different historians have different approaches to or interpretations of historical events.

FAQ: Will I have to write my research essay based exactly on my research proposal?

Answer: If your interest has changed by the time you start work on your research essay and you want to write about a different topic, you may do so. HOWEVER, be aware that you may be disadvantaging yourself in comparison to other students since you will not have the feedback provided after the project proposal. If you need help, get in contact with me!


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Demonstrate an understanding of European history in the twentieth century.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of a variety of conceptual and historiographical approaches to interpreting twentieth-century European history.
  • Sensitively contribute to contemporary debates about Europe and the world with an informed and critical understanding of the relationship between past and present.
  • Identify and interpret a wide variety of secondary and primary materials.
  • Examine historical issues by undertaking research according to the methodological and ethical conventions of the discipline.
  • Analyse historical evidence, scholarship and changing representations of the past.
  • Construct an evidence-based argument or narrative in audio, digital, oral, visual, or written form.
  • Identify and reflect critically on the knowledge and skills developed in their study of history.

Annotated Bibliography

Due: Week 5
Weighting: 10%

This constitutes Part 2 of the Research Project.

In the Annotated Bibliography, students will generate a bibliography of at least five secondary sources that supports their research project.  The goal of this assignment is to develop students' ability to conduct research and analyze source material. Students should list these titles and also include a descriptive paragraph for each that appraises the source. Each annotation should address the theme of the work, the authority of the author, and comment on the audience.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Demonstrate an understanding of European history in the twentieth century.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of a variety of conceptual and historiographical approaches to interpreting twentieth-century European history.
  • Sensitively contribute to contemporary debates about Europe and the world with an informed and critical understanding of the relationship between past and present.
  • Identify and interpret a wide variety of secondary and primary materials.
  • Examine historical issues by undertaking research according to the methodological and ethical conventions of the discipline.
  • Analyse historical evidence, scholarship and changing representations of the past.
  • Construct an evidence-based argument or narrative in audio, digital, oral, visual, or written form.

Primary Source Analysis

Due: Week 7
Weighting: 15%

For this assignment, students will examine a primary source of their choosing.  The primary source should be related to your final paper topic.  Proper provenance is crucial. 

The goal of this assignment is to develop students' ability to analyze a given primary historical document critically, contextualize it, comparing what we can and cannot tell from it, and interpret it to respond to a historical question.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Demonstrate an understanding of European history in the twentieth century.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of a variety of conceptual and historiographical approaches to interpreting twentieth-century European history.
  • Sensitively contribute to contemporary debates about Europe and the world with an informed and critical understanding of the relationship between past and present.
  • Identify and interpret a wide variety of secondary and primary materials.
  • Examine historical issues by undertaking research according to the methodological and ethical conventions of the discipline.
  • Analyse historical evidence, scholarship and changing representations of the past.
  • Construct an evidence-based argument or narrative in audio, digital, oral, visual, or written form.

Secondary Source Analysis

Due: Week 9
Weighting: 15%

For this assignment, students must examine a monograph (i.e. book) of their choosing.  This monograph should be related to their final paper topic. 

The goal of this assignment is to develop students' ability to evaluate a given piece of historical scholarship.  Students should briefly summarize the text, explain its major arguments, analyze the strength of its claims and their implications, and create an argument for this text will fit within your larger historiographic paper.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Demonstrate an understanding of European history in the twentieth century.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of a variety of conceptual and historiographical approaches to interpreting twentieth-century European history.
  • Sensitively contribute to contemporary debates about Europe and the world with an informed and critical understanding of the relationship between past and present.
  • Identify and interpret a wide variety of secondary and primary materials.
  • Examine historical issues by undertaking research according to the methodological and ethical conventions of the discipline.
  • Analyse historical evidence, scholarship and changing representations of the past.
  • Construct an evidence-based argument or narrative in audio, digital, oral, visual, or written form.

Research Paper

Due: Week 13
Weighting: 35%

Essay question: self-designed from Assignment 1 - your research project proposal.

The aim of this task is to assess your research, analytical and synthesis skills as well as your understanding and interpretation of one particular topic. It also assesses your ability to organize and communicate this information effectively in the formal of a formal, grammatically-correct, jargon-free, properly-referenced history essay.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Demonstrate an understanding of European history in the twentieth century.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of a variety of conceptual and historiographical approaches to interpreting twentieth-century European history.
  • Sensitively contribute to contemporary debates about Europe and the world with an informed and critical understanding of the relationship between past and present.
  • Identify and interpret a wide variety of secondary and primary materials.
  • Examine historical issues by undertaking research according to the methodological and ethical conventions of the discipline.
  • Analyse historical evidence, scholarship and changing representations of the past.
  • Construct an evidence-based argument or narrative in audio, digital, oral, visual, or written form.
  • Identify and reflect critically on the knowledge and skills developed in their study of history.

Delivery and Resources

Technology:

iLearn:  The MHIS220 website is accessed by logging in via https://ilearn.mq.edu.au/login/MQ/

 

Lecture and tutorial locations

Internal day classes: students must listen to the online lectures and attend one two-hour tutorial at any of the following times.

MHIS220/S2/Day/Seminar_1/01

Monday

9:00am

11:00am

2:00

31‑37,40‑45

 

25a Wallys Wlk - 111 Tutorial Rm

 

Keith Rathbone
MHIS220/S2/Day/Seminar_1/02

Monday

12:00pm

2:00pm

2:00

31‑37,40‑45

 

12 Second Wy - 232 Tutorial Rm

 

Keith Rathbone

For current updates, lecture times and classrooms please consult the MQ Timetables website: http://students.mq.edu.au/student_admin/timetables 

 

Required and recommended resources

All seminar readings have been uploaded as pdfs onto the MHIS220 website under each week’s seminar topic. No unit reader will be provided because of the new Faculty of Arts policy.

The library’s E-reserve (course code: MHIS220) holds many useful articles which will assist in the preparation of your essays. Most of the journal articles listed in this unit outline are available via the ‘Journal Finder’ link on the library’s main catalogue page: http://www.lib.mq.edu.au/

Unit Schedule

SCHEDULE

Week 1 – The Franco-Prussian War and the Unification of Germany

Secondary Source: Martin Kitchen, A History of Modern Germany, pg 101-123

Primary Source: “Letters from Otto v. Bismarck to his wife”*

 

Week 2  – European Imperialism

Secondary Source: Eric Hobsbawm Age of Empire: 1875-1914, pg 56-83*

Primary Source: Albert Memmi “Portrait of a Colonizer”*  

Project Proposal due August 13

 

Week 3 – The Belle Époque or the Fin-de-siècle ?

Secondary Source: Judith Walkowitz, City of Dreadful Delight: Narratives of Sexual Danger in Late-Victorian London, pg 191-228*; Vanessa Schwartz, Spectacular Realities: Early Mass Culture in Fin-de-siècle Paris, pg 45-88*; OR Carl Schorske, Fin-de-siècle Vienna: Politics and Culture, pg 181-207*

Primary Source: “Jack the Ripper Letters”  

 

Week 4 – The beginnings of the First World War

Secondary Source: Eric Dorn Brose, A History of Europe in the Twentieth Century, pg 77-119*

Primary Source: “Propaganda Posters”

 

Week 5 – The revolutionary outcomes of the Great War

Secondary Source: Mark Mazower, Dark Continent: Europe’s Twentieth Century, pg 3-40* AND Paul Fussell, The Great War and Modern Memory, pg 155-190*

Primary Source: “Poems”*

Annotated Bibliography due September 3

 

Week 6 – The Interwar Period

Secondary Source: William Sheridan Allen, The Nazi Seizure of Power: The Experience of a Single German Town, 1922-1945, pg 91-128* AND Mary Louise Roberts, Civilization without Sexes, pg 17-45*

Primary Source: “German New Objective Artwork”

 

Week 7 – The beginning of the Second World War

Day 13 – Julian Jackson, France: The Dark Years, 1940-1944, pg 272-299*         

Primary Source: “Marc Bloch, Strange Defeat, pg 126-176*

Primary Source Analysis

 

Session Recess 18th September – 2nd October

 

Week 8 – The Final Solution

Secondary Source: Christopher Browning, Ordinary Men: Reserve Police Battalion 101 and the Final Solution in Poland, pg 159-189*; AND Daniel Goldhagen, Hitler’s Willing Executioners, pg 239-262*

Primary Source: Listen to “Camp Survivor Testimonies”*

 

Week 9 – The Postwar

Secondary Source: Reading from Tony Judt, Postwar: A History of Europe since 1945, pg 13-40* AND Henry Rousso, The Vichy Syndrome: History and Memory in France since 1944, pg 15-59

Primary Source: “Nuremberg Trials Documents”

Secondary Source Analysis

 

Week 10 – The Rise of the Cold War

Secondary Source: Norman Naimark, The Russians in Germany, pg 141-204*

Primary Source: “Winston Churchill’s Iron Curtain Speech*

 

Week 11 – The Trente Glorieuse, Wirkshaftwunder, etc

Secondary Source: Victoria de Grazia, Irresistable Empire, pg 417-457*; John Briggs, Sounds French, pg 14-43*; OR Richard Evan Jobs, Backpack Ambassadors: How Youth Travel Integrated Europe, pg 11- 58*

Primary Source: “Two Cuts from Umbrellas of Cherbourg”*

 

Week 12 – The East and the West in 1968

Secondary Source: Mark Kurlansky, 1968: The Year That Rocked the World, pg 209-250*

Primary Source: “Graffiti from Paris 1968”*

 

Week 13 – The End of the Cold War

Secondary Source: Joan Wallach Scott, The Politics of the Veil, pg 21-41*

Primary Source: Surviving the Bosnian Genocide: The Women of Srebrenica Speak, pg 140-177*

FINAL PAPER DUE

Policies and Procedures

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central (https://staff.mq.edu.au/work/strategy-planning-and-governance/university-policies-and-procedures/policy-central). Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Undergraduate students seeking more policy resources can visit the Student Policy Gateway (https://students.mq.edu.au/support/study/student-policy-gateway). It is your one-stop-shop for the key policies you need to know about throughout your undergraduate student journey.

If you would like to see all the policies relevant to Learning and Teaching visit Policy Central (https://staff.mq.edu.au/work/strategy-planning-and-governance/university-policies-and-procedures/policy-central).

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/study/getting-started/student-conduct​

Results

Results shown in iLearn, or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent. For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au.

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Learning Skills

Learning Skills (mq.edu.au/learningskills) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to improve your marks and take control of your study.

Student Enquiry Service

For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at ask.mq.edu.au

Equity Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

IT Help

For help with University computer systems and technology, visit http://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/information_technology/help/

When using the University's IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use of IT Resources Policy. The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network including students.

Graduate Capabilities

Problem Solving and Research Capability

Our graduates should be capable of researching; of analysing, and interpreting and assessing data and information in various forms; of drawing connections across fields of knowledge; and they should be able to relate their knowledge to complex situations at work or in the world, in order to diagnose and solve problems. We want them to have the confidence to take the initiative in doing so, within an awareness of their own limitations.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Demonstrate an understanding of a variety of conceptual and historiographical approaches to interpreting twentieth-century European history.
  • Sensitively contribute to contemporary debates about Europe and the world with an informed and critical understanding of the relationship between past and present.
  • Identify and interpret a wide variety of secondary and primary materials.
  • Examine historical issues by undertaking research according to the methodological and ethical conventions of the discipline.
  • Analyse historical evidence, scholarship and changing representations of the past.
  • Construct an evidence-based argument or narrative in audio, digital, oral, visual, or written form.
  • Identify and reflect critically on the knowledge and skills developed in their study of history.

Assessment tasks

  • Participation
  • Report on Readings
  • Project Proposal
  • Annotated Bibliography
  • Primary Source Analysis
  • Secondary Source Analysis
  • Research Paper

Effective Communication

We want to develop in our students the ability to communicate and convey their views in forms effective with different audiences. We want our graduates to take with them the capability to read, listen, question, gather and evaluate information resources in a variety of formats, assess, write clearly, speak effectively, and to use visual communication and communication technologies as appropriate.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Demonstrate an understanding of European history in the twentieth century.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of a variety of conceptual and historiographical approaches to interpreting twentieth-century European history.
  • Sensitively contribute to contemporary debates about Europe and the world with an informed and critical understanding of the relationship between past and present.
  • Identify and interpret a wide variety of secondary and primary materials.
  • Examine historical issues by undertaking research according to the methodological and ethical conventions of the discipline.
  • Analyse historical evidence, scholarship and changing representations of the past.
  • Construct an evidence-based argument or narrative in audio, digital, oral, visual, or written form.
  • Identify and reflect critically on the knowledge and skills developed in their study of history.

Assessment tasks

  • Participation
  • Report on Readings
  • Project Proposal
  • Annotated Bibliography
  • Primary Source Analysis
  • Secondary Source Analysis
  • Research Paper

Capable of Professional and Personal Judgement and Initiative

We want our graduates to have emotional intelligence and sound interpersonal skills and to demonstrate discernment and common sense in their professional and personal judgement. They will exercise initiative as needed. They will be capable of risk assessment, and be able to handle ambiguity and complexity, enabling them to be adaptable in diverse and changing environments.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Demonstrate an understanding of European history in the twentieth century.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of a variety of conceptual and historiographical approaches to interpreting twentieth-century European history.
  • Sensitively contribute to contemporary debates about Europe and the world with an informed and critical understanding of the relationship between past and present.
  • Identify and interpret a wide variety of secondary and primary materials.
  • Examine historical issues by undertaking research according to the methodological and ethical conventions of the discipline.
  • Analyse historical evidence, scholarship and changing representations of the past.
  • Construct an evidence-based argument or narrative in audio, digital, oral, visual, or written form.
  • Identify and reflect critically on the knowledge and skills developed in their study of history.

Assessment tasks

  • Participation
  • Report on Readings
  • Project Proposal
  • Annotated Bibliography
  • Primary Source Analysis
  • Secondary Source Analysis
  • Research Paper

Discipline Specific Knowledge and Skills

Our graduates will take with them the intellectual development, depth and breadth of knowledge, scholarly understanding, and specific subject content in their chosen fields to make them competent and confident in their subject or profession. They will be able to demonstrate, where relevant, professional technical competence and meet professional standards. They will be able to articulate the structure of knowledge of their discipline, be able to adapt discipline-specific knowledge to novel situations, and be able to contribute from their discipline to inter-disciplinary solutions to problems.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Demonstrate an understanding of European history in the twentieth century.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of a variety of conceptual and historiographical approaches to interpreting twentieth-century European history.
  • Sensitively contribute to contemporary debates about Europe and the world with an informed and critical understanding of the relationship between past and present.
  • Identify and interpret a wide variety of secondary and primary materials.
  • Examine historical issues by undertaking research according to the methodological and ethical conventions of the discipline.
  • Analyse historical evidence, scholarship and changing representations of the past.
  • Construct an evidence-based argument or narrative in audio, digital, oral, visual, or written form.
  • Identify and reflect critically on the knowledge and skills developed in their study of history.

Assessment tasks

  • Participation
  • Report on Readings
  • Project Proposal
  • Annotated Bibliography
  • Primary Source Analysis
  • Secondary Source Analysis
  • Research Paper

Critical, Analytical and Integrative Thinking

We want our graduates to be capable of reasoning, questioning and analysing, and to integrate and synthesise learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments; to be able to critique constraints, assumptions and limitations; to be able to think independently and systemically in relation to scholarly activity, in the workplace, and in the world. We want them to have a level of scientific and information technology literacy.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Demonstrate an understanding of European history in the twentieth century.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of a variety of conceptual and historiographical approaches to interpreting twentieth-century European history.
  • Sensitively contribute to contemporary debates about Europe and the world with an informed and critical understanding of the relationship between past and present.
  • Identify and interpret a wide variety of secondary and primary materials.
  • Examine historical issues by undertaking research according to the methodological and ethical conventions of the discipline.
  • Analyse historical evidence, scholarship and changing representations of the past.
  • Construct an evidence-based argument or narrative in audio, digital, oral, visual, or written form.
  • Identify and reflect critically on the knowledge and skills developed in their study of history.

Assessment tasks

  • Participation
  • Report on Readings
  • Project Proposal
  • Annotated Bibliography
  • Primary Source Analysis
  • Secondary Source Analysis
  • Research Paper

Creative and Innovative

Our graduates will also be capable of creative thinking and of creating knowledge. They will be imaginative and open to experience and capable of innovation at work and in the community. We want them to be engaged in applying their critical, creative thinking.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Demonstrate an understanding of a variety of conceptual and historiographical approaches to interpreting twentieth-century European history.
  • Sensitively contribute to contemporary debates about Europe and the world with an informed and critical understanding of the relationship between past and present.
  • Identify and interpret a wide variety of secondary and primary materials.
  • Examine historical issues by undertaking research according to the methodological and ethical conventions of the discipline.
  • Analyse historical evidence, scholarship and changing representations of the past.
  • Construct an evidence-based argument or narrative in audio, digital, oral, visual, or written form.
  • Identify and reflect critically on the knowledge and skills developed in their study of history.

Assessment tasks

  • Participation
  • Report on Readings
  • Project Proposal
  • Annotated Bibliography
  • Primary Source Analysis
  • Secondary Source Analysis
  • Research Paper

Engaged and Ethical Local and Global citizens

As local citizens our graduates will be aware of indigenous perspectives and of the nation's historical context. They will be engaged with the challenges of contemporary society and with knowledge and ideas. We want our graduates to have respect for diversity, to be open-minded, sensitive to others and inclusive, and to be open to other cultures and perspectives: they should have a level of cultural literacy. Our graduates should be aware of disadvantage and social justice, and be willing to participate to help create a wiser and better society.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Demonstrate an understanding of European history in the twentieth century.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of a variety of conceptual and historiographical approaches to interpreting twentieth-century European history.
  • Sensitively contribute to contemporary debates about Europe and the world with an informed and critical understanding of the relationship between past and present.
  • Examine historical issues by undertaking research according to the methodological and ethical conventions of the discipline.
  • Analyse historical evidence, scholarship and changing representations of the past.
  • Construct an evidence-based argument or narrative in audio, digital, oral, visual, or written form.
  • Identify and reflect critically on the knowledge and skills developed in their study of history.

Assessment tasks

  • Participation
  • Report on Readings
  • Project Proposal
  • Annotated Bibliography
  • Primary Source Analysis
  • Secondary Source Analysis
  • Research Paper

Socially and Environmentally Active and Responsible

We want our graduates to be aware of and have respect for self and others; to be able to work with others as a leader and a team player; to have a sense of connectedness with others and country; and to have a sense of mutual obligation. Our graduates should be informed and active participants in moving society towards sustainability.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Demonstrate an understanding of European history in the twentieth century.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of a variety of conceptual and historiographical approaches to interpreting twentieth-century European history.
  • Sensitively contribute to contemporary debates about Europe and the world with an informed and critical understanding of the relationship between past and present.
  • Examine historical issues by undertaking research according to the methodological and ethical conventions of the discipline.
  • Analyse historical evidence, scholarship and changing representations of the past.
  • Construct an evidence-based argument or narrative in audio, digital, oral, visual, or written form.
  • Identify and reflect critically on the knowledge and skills developed in their study of history.

Assessment tasks

  • Participation
  • Report on Readings
  • Project Proposal
  • Annotated Bibliography
  • Primary Source Analysis
  • Secondary Source Analysis
  • Research Paper

Commitment to Continuous Learning

Our graduates will have enquiring minds and a literate curiosity which will lead them to pursue knowledge for its own sake. They will continue to pursue learning in their careers and as they participate in the world. They will be capable of reflecting on their experiences and relationships with others and the environment, learning from them, and growing - personally, professionally and socially.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Demonstrate an understanding of European history in the twentieth century.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of a variety of conceptual and historiographical approaches to interpreting twentieth-century European history.
  • Sensitively contribute to contemporary debates about Europe and the world with an informed and critical understanding of the relationship between past and present.
  • Identify and interpret a wide variety of secondary and primary materials.
  • Examine historical issues by undertaking research according to the methodological and ethical conventions of the discipline.
  • Analyse historical evidence, scholarship and changing representations of the past.
  • Construct an evidence-based argument or narrative in audio, digital, oral, visual, or written form.
  • Identify and reflect critically on the knowledge and skills developed in their study of history.

Assessment tasks

  • Participation
  • Report on Readings
  • Project Proposal
  • Annotated Bibliography
  • Primary Source Analysis
  • Secondary Source Analysis
  • Research Paper