Logo Students

MHIS218 – Football as Global History

2018 – S1 External

General Information

Pdf icon Download as PDF
Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff
Keith Rathbone
Credit points Credit points
3
Prerequisites Prerequisites
12cp at 100 level or above or (3cp in HIST or MHIS or POL units)
Corequisites Corequisites
Co-badged status Co-badged status
Unit description Unit description
Global football across its various codes (soccer, rugby, Australian Rules, and American Football) comes as close to a universal human experience as any other activity. The football's reach dwarfs all major religions and political empires. The emergence of global communication and financial networks have further propelled football's popularity and allowed all of the codes to grow tremendously. Fans can now follow their favorite teams from one corner of the globe to the other. This course explores the ways that football as broadly understood was shaped by and has helped shape global political, social, and cultural history since 1850. Emerging in the private schools of upper class England, football, rugby, and soccer quickly spread across the globe following patterns of trade, colonization, and war. As soon as it appeared, these games became enmeshed in debates about race, class, ethnicity, gender, and political and social economy. Football’s social and cultural meaning carries through to today and provides a rich field for historical inquiry. We will approach the study of the football codes through a close reading of a variety of primary and secondary sources with the goal of producing an original research paper. A series of scaffolded assignments lead to the final paper written on a topic of the student’s choice.

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at https://students.mq.edu.au/important-dates

Learning Outcomes

  1. Identify and reflect critically on the knowledge and skills developed in their study of history
  2. Construct an evidence-based argument or narrative in audio, digital, oral, visual, or written form.
  3. Analyse historical evidence, scholarship and changing representations of the past.
  4. Examine historical issues by undertaking research according to the methodological and ethical conventions of the discipline.
  5. Identify and interpret a wide variety of secondary and primary materials.
  6. Sensitively contribute to contemporary debates about the world with an informed and critical understanding of the relationship between past and present.
  7. Demonstrate an understanding of a variety of conceptual approaches to interpreting Global history.
  8. Demonstrate an understanding of Global history in the nineteenth and twentieth century.

General Assessment Information

Assignment submission

Double-spaced type and pages with wide margins (for comments) are preferred. Footnotes and bibliography are mandatory.

All assignments (except for the exam) must be submitted as Word documents via Turnitin on the MHIS218 iLearn site:

  1. Log in to your iLearn account and go to your home page. Turnitin assignments should be visible under MHIS218: Football as Global History.
  2. If not, log in to MHIS218 and scroll down until you reach the subheading for the week.  ‘Assignment details and submission via Turnitin should be visible in that week. 
  3. Click on the assignment title.
  4. Type the title of your assignment in the box ‘Submission Title’.
  5. To upload your Word document, click on ‘Browse’ next to the ‘File to Submit’ box. Find and select your document from your computer, check the box for copyright, then click on the ‘Add submission’ button.

 

Detailed instructions on how to use Turnitin with can be found at:

http://www.mq.edu.au/iLearn/student_info/assignments.htm#submit_turnitin

 

Feedback will be provided via Grademark. Go to the following URL for instructions on how to view your feedback:

http://www.mq.edu.au/iLearn/student_info/assignments.htm#results

 

Extensions and penalties

Unless a Special Consideration request has been submitted and approved, (a) a penalty for lateness will apply – two (2) marks out of 100 will be deducted per day for assignments submitted after the due date – and (b) no assignment will be accepted more than seven (7) days (incl. weekends) after the original submission deadline. No late submissions will be accepted for timed assessments – e.g. quizzes, online tests.

Assignments handed in early will not be marked and returned before the due date.

Always keep a copy of your assessment tasks in case they get lost in the system.

 

Returning assignments

Assignments will be returned online via the MHIS218 iLearn site. For more information on how to view your marked assignments, see: http://www.mq.edu.au/iLearn/student_info/assignments.htm#results

Assignments will be marked and returned within two weeks of receipt.

 

Other information

Disruption to Studies

No work will be accepted for marking after the final paper deadline unless you have submitted a request for Disruption to Studies with adequate and appropriate supporting evidence. 

Please note that requests for disruption to studies are not granted automatically, and are reserved for unforeseen and serious circumstances such as prolonged illness, hospitalisation or bereavement in your immediate family. If you believe that you qualify for special consideration, please contact Dr Teo as soon as possible.

 

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Hurdle Due
External Participation 20% No Each Week
Project Proposal 5% No Friday of Week 3
Annotated Bibliography 10% No Friday of Week 7
Primary Source Analysis 15% No Friday of Week 8
Secondary Source Analysis 15% No Friday of Week 10
Research Paper 35% No Friday of Week 13

External Participation

Due: Each Week
Weighting: 20%

External Participation 

Pass rate: students must complete at least 70% of reading reports to pass this course.

Students are expected to respond to the readings on iLearn three times per week. In their first response, student should write approximately 200-300 words in the (External and Internal) Forum and explain:

1.  What is the reading about?

2.  What is the argument presented about this topic? (i.e. How does the historian explain the cause, effects or consequences, or significance of the topic? What evidence and reasoning support this argument?)

3.  Propose two questions for class consideration.  

In their second and third responses, students should write 200-300 words in response to questions posed by their classmates in the (External) Classroom Forum.  

Reports on the readings will be checked weekly by me or your group leader for that week. 

The aim of this task is to ensure that students have done the weekly readings and come to seminars adequately prepared to participate in class discussions. It will also enable me to check that students have understood the readings and the topics.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Identify and reflect critically on the knowledge and skills developed in their study of history
  • Construct an evidence-based argument or narrative in audio, digital, oral, visual, or written form.
  • Analyse historical evidence, scholarship and changing representations of the past.
  • Identify and interpret a wide variety of secondary and primary materials.
  • Sensitively contribute to contemporary debates about the world with an informed and critical understanding of the relationship between past and present.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of a variety of conceptual approaches to interpreting Global history.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of Global history in the nineteenth and twentieth century.

Project Proposal

Due: Friday of Week 3
Weighting: 5%

This constitutes Part 1 of the Research Project

Word length: approximately 500 words, excluding bibliography

See the iLearn site for marking rubrics.

Students must design a research essay question focusing on any aspect of football history

Submit a research project proposal including the following information:

1. The essay question you have designed. This must be a specific historical question.

2. One page (double spaced with adequate margins for marking) providing short answers to the following questions:

What is my topic about?

Who are the some important historians or sources related to this question?

Are there other themes or issues I need to understand in order to explore this topic properly?

FAQ: Will I have to write my research essay based exactly on my research proposal

Answer: If your interest has changed by the time you start work on your research essay and you want to write about a different topic, you may do so. HOWEVER, be aware that you may be disadvantaging yourself in comparison to other students since you will not have the feedback provided after the project proposal. If you need help, get in contact with me!


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Identify and reflect critically on the knowledge and skills developed in their study of history
  • Construct an evidence-based argument or narrative in audio, digital, oral, visual, or written form.
  • Analyse historical evidence, scholarship and changing representations of the past.
  • Examine historical issues by undertaking research according to the methodological and ethical conventions of the discipline.
  • Identify and interpret a wide variety of secondary and primary materials.
  • Sensitively contribute to contemporary debates about the world with an informed and critical understanding of the relationship between past and present.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of a variety of conceptual approaches to interpreting Global history.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of Global history in the nineteenth and twentieth century.

Annotated Bibliography

Due: Friday of Week 7
Weighting: 10%

This constitutes Part 2 of the Research Project.

In the Annotated Bibliography, students will generate a bibliography of at least five secondary sources that supports their research project.  The goal of this assignment is to develop students' ability to conduct research and analyze source material. Students should list these titles and also include a descriptive paragraph for each that appraises the source. Each annotation should address the theme of the work, the authority of the author, and comment on the audience.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Identify and reflect critically on the knowledge and skills developed in their study of history
  • Construct an evidence-based argument or narrative in audio, digital, oral, visual, or written form.
  • Examine historical issues by undertaking research according to the methodological and ethical conventions of the discipline.
  • Identify and interpret a wide variety of secondary and primary materials.
  • Sensitively contribute to contemporary debates about the world with an informed and critical understanding of the relationship between past and present.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of Global history in the nineteenth and twentieth century.

Primary Source Analysis

Due: Friday of Week 8
Weighting: 15%

For this assignment, students must do a primary source analysis. 

In your Primary Source Analysis (2-3 pages), you will examine a primary source of your choosing.  The primary source should be related to your final paper topic.  Proper provenance is crucial.  

The goal of this assignment is to develop students' ability to analyze a given primary historical document critically, contextualize it, comparing what we can and cannot tell from it, and interpret it to respond to a historical question.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Identify and reflect critically on the knowledge and skills developed in their study of history
  • Construct an evidence-based argument or narrative in audio, digital, oral, visual, or written form.
  • Analyse historical evidence, scholarship and changing representations of the past.
  • Examine historical issues by undertaking research according to the methodological and ethical conventions of the discipline.
  • Identify and interpret a wide variety of secondary and primary materials.
  • Sensitively contribute to contemporary debates about the world with an informed and critical understanding of the relationship between past and present.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of a variety of conceptual approaches to interpreting Global history.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of Global history in the nineteenth and twentieth century.

Secondary Source Analysis

Due: Friday of Week 10
Weighting: 15%

In their Secondary Source Analysis (750 words), students must examine a monograph of their choosing.  Ideally this monograph should be related to their final paper topic.

Students should briefly summarize the text, explain its major arguments, analyze the strength of its claims and their implications, and create an argument for this text will fit within your larger historiographic paper.

The goal of this assignment is to develop students' ability to evaluate a given piece of historical scholarship as a scaffold to the final paper.  


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Identify and reflect critically on the knowledge and skills developed in their study of history
  • Construct an evidence-based argument or narrative in audio, digital, oral, visual, or written form.
  • Analyse historical evidence, scholarship and changing representations of the past.
  • Examine historical issues by undertaking research according to the methodological and ethical conventions of the discipline.
  • Identify and interpret a wide variety of secondary and primary materials.
  • Sensitively contribute to contemporary debates about the world with an informed and critical understanding of the relationship between past and present.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of a variety of conceptual approaches to interpreting Global history.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of Global history in the nineteenth and twentieth century.

Research Paper

Due: Friday of Week 13
Weighting: 35%

Essay question: self-designed from Assignment 1 - your research project proposal. See iLearn site for marking rubrics.

In this assignments, students will write a 9-10 page history of a major football event, a football association, a football federation/league or other football related thing of their choosing.  You can choose to write about the highs and lows, championships won and lost, promotions and relegations, star players and bête noires, however, you should not forget that a history of football means more than the 11 players on the field and encompasses coaches, front and back offices, fans, and even whole nations.  The best papers will link the history of the event/club/federation/etc with issues related to the themes of the course, including the formation of social classes, the spread of sports through colonization and commerce, sporting associations and political violence, and/or globalization. 

The aim of this task is to assess your research, analytical and synthesis skills as well as your understanding and interpretation of the historiography of one particular topic. It also assesses your ability to organize and communicate this information effectively in the formal of a formal, grammatically-correct, jargon-free, properly-referenced history essay.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Identify and reflect critically on the knowledge and skills developed in their study of history
  • Construct an evidence-based argument or narrative in audio, digital, oral, visual, or written form.
  • Analyse historical evidence, scholarship and changing representations of the past.
  • Examine historical issues by undertaking research according to the methodological and ethical conventions of the discipline.
  • Identify and interpret a wide variety of secondary and primary materials.
  • Sensitively contribute to contemporary debates about the world with an informed and critical understanding of the relationship between past and present.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of a variety of conceptual approaches to interpreting Global history.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of Global history in the nineteenth and twentieth century.

Delivery and Resources

Technology:

iLearn:  The MHIS218 website is accessed by logging in via https://ilearn.mq.edu.au/login/MQ/

 

Lecture and tutorial locations

Internal day classes: students must attend two one-hour lecture and one one-hour tutorial at any of the following times.

 

  MHIS218/S1/Day/Lecture_1/01

Tuesday

10:00am

11:00am

1:00

9‑15,18‑23

60

12 Second Wy - 226 Tutorial Rm

 

60
  MHIS218/S1/Day/Lecture_2/01

Wednesday

10:00am

11:00am

1:00

9‑15,18‑23

60

25a Wallys Wlk - 208 Tutorial Rm

 

65
  MHIS218/S1/Day/Tutorial_1/01

Tuesday

12:00pm

1:00pm

1:00

9‑15,18‑23

25

29 Wallys Wlk - 132 Tutorial Rm

 

30
  MHIS218/S1/Day/Tutorial_1/02

Tuesday

11:00am

12:00pm

1:00

9‑15,18‑23

25

11 Wallys Wlk - 140 Tutorial Rm

 

50
  MHIS218/S1/Day/Tutorial_1/03

Wednesday

11:00am

12:00pm

1:00

9‑15,18‑23

25

4 Western Rd - 309 Tutorial Rm

 

25

 

For current updates, lecture times and classrooms please consult the MQ Timetables website: http://students.mq.edu.au/student_admin/timetables 

 

 

Required and recommended resources

All seminar readings have been uploaded as pdfs onto the MHIS218 website under each week’s seminar topic. No unit reader will be provided because of the new Faculty of Arts policy.

The library’s E-reserve (course code: MHIS218) holds many useful articles which will assist in the preparation of your essays. Most of the journal articles listed in this unit outline are available via the ‘Journal Finder’ link on the library’s main catalogue page: http://www.lib.mq.edu.au/

Unit Schedule

SCHEDULE

 

Sports History

Week 1 – Why study sports history?

Lecture 1 – “What is sports history”

Lecture 2 – “Football’s origins”

Reading: C.L.R. James Beyond a Boundary, pg 20-46; AND David Goldblatt, The Ball is Round, "Forward," pg ix-xii; "Introduction," pg xiii-0

Assignments: Report on Readings 

 

Football and Identity Formation

Week 2 – Pre-modern Ball Games and the Invention of Football

Lecture 1 – “The Pre-Modern Origins of Ball Games”

Lecture 2 – “The Invention of Soccer”

Reading: William Baker, "The Making of Working Class Football Culture in Victorian England," pg 241-251 AND Peter Swain, “The Origins of Football Debate: Football and Cultural Continuity, 1857-1859,” International Journal of the History of Sports, 32, No. 5: 631-649

Assignments: Report on Reading

 

Week 3 – Early Australian Football

Lecture 1 – “Working Class Sports in Metropole and Colony”

Lecture 2 –  “The Making of Australian Rules Football”

Reading:  Jenny Hocking and Nell Reidy, “Marngrook, Tom Wills, and the Continuing Denial of Indigenous History: On the Origins of Australian Football” Meinjin Quarterly, Winter 2016: 83-93 AND Charles Little, “’What a Freak-Show They Made!’ Women’s Rugby League in 1920s Sydney,” Football Studies, 4: 25-40

Assignments: Report on Reading

                       Proposals

 

 

Week 4 – Gender and Sport around World War I

Lecture 1 – “Gender and identity in sports”

Lecture 2 – “Soccer in the trenches and soccer in the home front”

Reading: Arnaud Waquet, "Wartime Football, a Remedy for the Masculine Vulnerability of Poilus (1914-1919)," International Journal of the History of Sport, pg 1195-1214* AND Wendy Michallat, “Terrain de lutte: Women’s Football and Feminism in ‘Les années folles,’” French Cultural Studies 18(3): 259-276

Assignments: Report on Reading

 

 

Week 5 – Football’s First Age of Globalization

Lecture 1 – “Immigration and sports”

Lecture 2 – “Football in Europe in the 1930s”

Reading: Peter Alegi, African Soccerscapes, "The Africanization of Football," pg 14-35 AND Gregory Quin, “Central Europe Rules European Football: The ‘Golden Age’ of Regional Connections in European Football (1926-1938)” in Building Europe with the Ball, pg 53-74

Assignments: Report on Reading

 

 

Football and Biopolitics

Week 6 – Football and Biopolitics

Lecture 1 – “Sports and State Biopolitics”

Lecture 2 – “The 1936 Berlin Olympic”

Reading: John Hargreaves, “The Body, Sport, and Power Relations,” The Sociological Review, 33: 139-159 AND Imke Fischer, “The Involvement of the Commonwealth Government in Physical Education From Defense to National Fitness” in Sport, Federation, Nation

Assignments: Report on Reading

 

Week 7 – Football Codes under Occupation

Lecture 1 – “Football under Occupation”

Lecture 2 – “Sport and Resistance to the State”

Reading: Sid Lowe, Fear and Loathing in La Liga, “The Forgotten President,” pg 38-56; AND Simon Kuper, Ajax, the Dutch, and the War, “Sparta,” pg 69-92

Assignments: Report on Reading

                       Annotated Bibliography

 

Session Recess

 

Football and Decolonization

Week 8 – Football in the Colonial World

Lecture 1 – “The Role of Football in the Colonies”

Lecture 2 – “African Urbanity and Sport”

Reading: Read Peter Alegi, African Soccerscapes,"Making Nations in Late Colonial Africa," 36-53;  AND Phyllis Martin, Leisure and Society in Colonial Brazzaville, "Football is King," pg 99-126*

Assignments: Report on Reading

                       Primary Source Analysis

 

Week 9 – Football, Decolonization, and Migration  

Lecture 1 – “Football and Migration”

Lecture 2 – “Football and Migration II”

Reading: Laurent Dubois, Soccer Empire, “A Beautiful Harvest,” pg 23-46 AND Charles Little, Through Thick and Thin, “Ethnicity and Sport after 1945,” pg 67-80

Assignments: Report on Reading

 

 

Contemporary Football Issues:

Week 10 – Neoliberal Football

Lecture 1 – “The Economics of Modern Football”

Lecture 2 – “Neoliberalism and Stadium Construction”

Reading: David Goldblatt, The Game of our Lives, “Aspiration and Illusion: The Economics of the New Football,” pg 1-34 AND Gerald Podair “Private Gain, Public Good? The Business of Baseball in Los Angeles,” 201-231. 

Assignments: Report on Reading

                       Secondary Source Analysis

 

Week 11 – Challenges to Sports’ Neoliberal Framework

Lecture 1 – “Hooliganism”

Lecture 2 – “Racism in French Football”

Reading: David Goldblatt, “Playing the Race Game: Migration, Ethnicity, and Identity,” The Game of our Lives, pg 145-182 AND Laurent Dubois, “An Unfinished War” and “Reconciliation,” Soccer Empire: The World Cup and the Future of France, pg 177-213

Assignments: Report on Reading

 

Week 12 – Gender and Race in Contemporary Australian Sports

Lecture 1 – “Gender and Sex in Australian Sport”

Lecture 2 – “Gender and Sex in Australian Sport II”

Readings: John Cash and Joy Damousi, Footy Passions, “Fathers and Daughters at Play,” pg 63-93 AND Leigh Boucher, “Public Emotions and their Personal Consequences: The Nationalizing Affects of the Australian Football League since 1900” International Journal of the History of Sports, vol 32, no 12: 1546-1566

Assignments: Report on Reading

 

Week 13 – The Future of Football

Lecture 1 – “Football in the Arab World”

Lecture 2 – “The Future of Football”

Reading: Franklin Foer, How Soccer Explains the World, “How Soccer Explains Islam’s Hope,” pg 217-234;” AND Russ Crawford, Le Football, “Leveling the Playing Field,” 249-268

Assignments: Report on Reading

 

FINAL PAPER DUE: June 8th, 11:59PM

Policies and Procedures

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central (https://staff.mq.edu.au/work/strategy-planning-and-governance/university-policies-and-procedures/policy-central). Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Undergraduate students seeking more policy resources can visit the Student Policy Gateway (https://students.mq.edu.au/support/study/student-policy-gateway). It is your one-stop-shop for the key policies you need to know about throughout your undergraduate student journey.

If you would like to see all the policies relevant to Learning and Teaching visit Policy Central (https://staff.mq.edu.au/work/strategy-planning-and-governance/university-policies-and-procedures/policy-central).

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/study/getting-started/student-conduct​

Results

Results shown in iLearn, or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent. For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au.

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Learning Skills

Learning Skills (mq.edu.au/learningskills) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to improve your marks and take control of your study.

Student Enquiry Service

For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at ask.mq.edu.au

Equity Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

IT Help

For help with University computer systems and technology, visit http://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/information_technology/help/

When using the University's IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use of IT Resources Policy. The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network including students.

Graduate Capabilities

Problem Solving and Research Capability

Our graduates should be capable of researching; of analysing, and interpreting and assessing data and information in various forms; of drawing connections across fields of knowledge; and they should be able to relate their knowledge to complex situations at work or in the world, in order to diagnose and solve problems. We want them to have the confidence to take the initiative in doing so, within an awareness of their own limitations.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Identify and reflect critically on the knowledge and skills developed in their study of history
  • Construct an evidence-based argument or narrative in audio, digital, oral, visual, or written form.
  • Analyse historical evidence, scholarship and changing representations of the past.
  • Examine historical issues by undertaking research according to the methodological and ethical conventions of the discipline.
  • Identify and interpret a wide variety of secondary and primary materials.
  • Sensitively contribute to contemporary debates about the world with an informed and critical understanding of the relationship between past and present.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of a variety of conceptual approaches to interpreting Global history.

Assessment tasks

  • External Participation
  • Project Proposal
  • Annotated Bibliography
  • Primary Source Analysis
  • Secondary Source Analysis
  • Research Paper

Effective Communication

We want to develop in our students the ability to communicate and convey their views in forms effective with different audiences. We want our graduates to take with them the capability to read, listen, question, gather and evaluate information resources in a variety of formats, assess, write clearly, speak effectively, and to use visual communication and communication technologies as appropriate.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Identify and reflect critically on the knowledge and skills developed in their study of history
  • Construct an evidence-based argument or narrative in audio, digital, oral, visual, or written form.
  • Analyse historical evidence, scholarship and changing representations of the past.
  • Identify and interpret a wide variety of secondary and primary materials.
  • Sensitively contribute to contemporary debates about the world with an informed and critical understanding of the relationship between past and present.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of a variety of conceptual approaches to interpreting Global history.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of Global history in the nineteenth and twentieth century.

Assessment tasks

  • External Participation
  • Project Proposal
  • Annotated Bibliography
  • Primary Source Analysis
  • Secondary Source Analysis
  • Research Paper

Capable of Professional and Personal Judgement and Initiative

We want our graduates to have emotional intelligence and sound interpersonal skills and to demonstrate discernment and common sense in their professional and personal judgement. They will exercise initiative as needed. They will be capable of risk assessment, and be able to handle ambiguity and complexity, enabling them to be adaptable in diverse and changing environments.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Identify and reflect critically on the knowledge and skills developed in their study of history
  • Construct an evidence-based argument or narrative in audio, digital, oral, visual, or written form.
  • Analyse historical evidence, scholarship and changing representations of the past.
  • Examine historical issues by undertaking research according to the methodological and ethical conventions of the discipline.
  • Identify and interpret a wide variety of secondary and primary materials.
  • Sensitively contribute to contemporary debates about the world with an informed and critical understanding of the relationship between past and present.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of a variety of conceptual approaches to interpreting Global history.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of Global history in the nineteenth and twentieth century.

Assessment tasks

  • External Participation
  • Project Proposal
  • Annotated Bibliography
  • Primary Source Analysis
  • Secondary Source Analysis
  • Research Paper

Discipline Specific Knowledge and Skills

Our graduates will take with them the intellectual development, depth and breadth of knowledge, scholarly understanding, and specific subject content in their chosen fields to make them competent and confident in their subject or profession. They will be able to demonstrate, where relevant, professional technical competence and meet professional standards. They will be able to articulate the structure of knowledge of their discipline, be able to adapt discipline-specific knowledge to novel situations, and be able to contribute from their discipline to inter-disciplinary solutions to problems.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Identify and reflect critically on the knowledge and skills developed in their study of history
  • Construct an evidence-based argument or narrative in audio, digital, oral, visual, or written form.
  • Analyse historical evidence, scholarship and changing representations of the past.
  • Examine historical issues by undertaking research according to the methodological and ethical conventions of the discipline.
  • Identify and interpret a wide variety of secondary and primary materials.
  • Sensitively contribute to contemporary debates about the world with an informed and critical understanding of the relationship between past and present.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of a variety of conceptual approaches to interpreting Global history.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of Global history in the nineteenth and twentieth century.

Assessment tasks

  • External Participation
  • Project Proposal
  • Annotated Bibliography
  • Primary Source Analysis
  • Secondary Source Analysis
  • Research Paper

Critical, Analytical and Integrative Thinking

We want our graduates to be capable of reasoning, questioning and analysing, and to integrate and synthesise learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments; to be able to critique constraints, assumptions and limitations; to be able to think independently and systemically in relation to scholarly activity, in the workplace, and in the world. We want them to have a level of scientific and information technology literacy.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Identify and reflect critically on the knowledge and skills developed in their study of history
  • Construct an evidence-based argument or narrative in audio, digital, oral, visual, or written form.
  • Analyse historical evidence, scholarship and changing representations of the past.
  • Examine historical issues by undertaking research according to the methodological and ethical conventions of the discipline.
  • Identify and interpret a wide variety of secondary and primary materials.
  • Sensitively contribute to contemporary debates about the world with an informed and critical understanding of the relationship between past and present.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of a variety of conceptual approaches to interpreting Global history.

Assessment tasks

  • External Participation
  • Project Proposal
  • Annotated Bibliography
  • Primary Source Analysis
  • Secondary Source Analysis
  • Research Paper

Creative and Innovative

Our graduates will also be capable of creative thinking and of creating knowledge. They will be imaginative and open to experience and capable of innovation at work and in the community. We want them to be engaged in applying their critical, creative thinking.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Identify and reflect critically on the knowledge and skills developed in their study of history
  • Construct an evidence-based argument or narrative in audio, digital, oral, visual, or written form.
  • Analyse historical evidence, scholarship and changing representations of the past.
  • Examine historical issues by undertaking research according to the methodological and ethical conventions of the discipline.
  • Identify and interpret a wide variety of secondary and primary materials.
  • Sensitively contribute to contemporary debates about the world with an informed and critical understanding of the relationship between past and present.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of a variety of conceptual approaches to interpreting Global history.

Assessment tasks

  • External Participation
  • Project Proposal
  • Annotated Bibliography
  • Primary Source Analysis
  • Secondary Source Analysis
  • Research Paper

Engaged and Ethical Local and Global citizens

As local citizens our graduates will be aware of indigenous perspectives and of the nation's historical context. They will be engaged with the challenges of contemporary society and with knowledge and ideas. We want our graduates to have respect for diversity, to be open-minded, sensitive to others and inclusive, and to be open to other cultures and perspectives: they should have a level of cultural literacy. Our graduates should be aware of disadvantage and social justice, and be willing to participate to help create a wiser and better society.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Construct an evidence-based argument or narrative in audio, digital, oral, visual, or written form.
  • Analyse historical evidence, scholarship and changing representations of the past.
  • Sensitively contribute to contemporary debates about the world with an informed and critical understanding of the relationship between past and present.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of a variety of conceptual approaches to interpreting Global history.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of Global history in the nineteenth and twentieth century.

Assessment tasks

  • External Participation
  • Research Paper

Socially and Environmentally Active and Responsible

We want our graduates to be aware of and have respect for self and others; to be able to work with others as a leader and a team player; to have a sense of connectedness with others and country; and to have a sense of mutual obligation. Our graduates should be informed and active participants in moving society towards sustainability.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Construct an evidence-based argument or narrative in audio, digital, oral, visual, or written form.
  • Analyse historical evidence, scholarship and changing representations of the past.
  • Sensitively contribute to contemporary debates about the world with an informed and critical understanding of the relationship between past and present.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of a variety of conceptual approaches to interpreting Global history.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of Global history in the nineteenth and twentieth century.

Assessment tasks

  • External Participation
  • Research Paper

Commitment to Continuous Learning

Our graduates will have enquiring minds and a literate curiosity which will lead them to pursue knowledge for its own sake. They will continue to pursue learning in their careers and as they participate in the world. They will be capable of reflecting on their experiences and relationships with others and the environment, learning from them, and growing - personally, professionally and socially.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Identify and reflect critically on the knowledge and skills developed in their study of history
  • Construct an evidence-based argument or narrative in audio, digital, oral, visual, or written form.
  • Analyse historical evidence, scholarship and changing representations of the past.
  • Examine historical issues by undertaking research according to the methodological and ethical conventions of the discipline.
  • Identify and interpret a wide variety of secondary and primary materials.
  • Sensitively contribute to contemporary debates about the world with an informed and critical understanding of the relationship between past and present.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of a variety of conceptual approaches to interpreting Global history.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of Global history in the nineteenth and twentieth century.

Assessment tasks

  • External Participation
  • Project Proposal
  • Annotated Bibliography
  • Primary Source Analysis
  • Secondary Source Analysis
  • Research Paper