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ECH 113 – Play and Inquiry in Early Childhood

2018 – S2 External

General Information

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Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff Convenor
Dr Yeshe Colliver
275
Consultation by appointment only
Credit points Credit points
3
Prerequisites Prerequisites
Corequisites Corequisites
Co-badged status Co-badged status
Unit description Unit description
This unit examines the role of play and inquiry in children's lives, their learning and development. Students develop a theoretical understanding of the characteristics of young children's play and inquiry and explore how environments, resources and teaching techniques can be structured to facilitate children's active and meaningful engagement in the learning process. Students will analyse the developmental and educational potential of children's play and inquiry across a range of contexts and will reflect on how play and inquiry experiences can be used to cater for children with diverse developmental, educational and cultural learning styles.

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at https://students.mq.edu.au/important-dates

Learning Outcomes

  1. 1. An understanding of the characteristics of young children’s play and inquiry across different contexts
  2. 2. An ability to identify and apply relevant theoretical knowledge about play and inquiry in order to address the assignment requirements.
  3. 3. An ability to analyse the features and potentials of young children’s play environments and materials
  4. 4. An ability to generate ideas about play/inquiry experiences that will enhance children’s experiences and learning
  5. 5. An ability to format and submit assignments appropriately and on time, as per instructions in the Unit Guide.
  6. 6. An ability to address assignment requirements using appropriate academic written expression.
  7. 7. An ability to identify key arguments in academic readings and use these appropriately to support the views expressed in assignments
  8. 8. An ability to use in-text citations and construct a reference list using APA 6th style.

General Assessment Information

Assignment Instructions

A full set of instructions for each assignment can be found in the Assignment guide, which will be available on the ECH113 iLearn site, under "Study Resources and Assignment Links" 

Assignment extensions and late penalties

Applications for extensions must be made via AskMQ at https://ask.mq.edu.au as a Special Consideration request before the submission date. Students who experience a disruption to their studies through ill-health or misadventure are able to apply for this request. Extensions can only be granted if they meet the Special Considerations policy and are submitted via https://ask.mq.edu.au/. This will ensure consistency in the consideration of such requests is maintained.

In general, there should be no need for extensions except through illness or misadventure that would be categorised as unavoidable disruption according to the University definition of same, see:  https://students.mq.edu.au/study/my-study-program/special-consideration

Late submissions without extension will receive a penalty of 5% reduction of the total possible mark for each day (or part thereof) late, including weekends and public holidays. You are reminded that submitting even just 1 day late could be the difference between passing and failing a unit. Late penalties are applied by unit convenors or their delegates after tasks are assessed.

No assessable work will be accepted after the return/release of marked work on the same topic. If a student is still permitted to submit on the basis of unavoidable disruption, an alternative topic may be set.

Students should keep an electronic file of all assessments. Claims regarding "lost" assessments cannot be made if the file cannot be produced. It is also advisable to keep an electronic file of all drafts and the final submission on a USB untouched/unopened after submission. This can be used to demonstrate easily that the assessment has not been amended after the submission date.

 

Requesting a re-mark of an assignment

If you have evidence that your task has been incorrectly assessed against the grade descriptors you can request a re-mark.  To request a re-mark you need to contact  the unit convenor within 7 days of the date of return of the assignment and provide a detailed assessment of your script against the task criteria. Evidence from your assignment must be provided to support your judgements.

Note: Failed assessments can not be re-submitted as they are all double-marked as a part of the moderation process.

Please note: The outcome of a re-mark may be a higher/lower or unchanged grade. Grades are standards referenced and effort is NOT a criterion.

 

Assessment Presentation & Submission Guidelines

Please follow these guidelines when you submit each assignment:

  • Allow a left and right-hand margin of at least 2cm in all assignments.

  • Use APA 6th Edition referencing style to acknowledge your sources and support your ideas with in-text referencing (use Perrin, 2017 to ensure correctness). Attention to all APA formatting conventions is important.

  • Please type all assignments using 12-point font and 1.5 spacing.

  • All assessments must be submitted through Turnitin in .doc or .pdf format

  • It is the onus of the student to ensure that all assessments are successfully submitted through Turnitin.

  • Faculty assignment cover sheets are NOT required.

 

Draft Submissions & Turnitin Originality Reports

  • Students may use Turnitin’s Originality Report as a learning tool to improve their academic writing if this option is made available in the unit.

  • Students are strongly encouraged to upload a draft copy of each assessment to Turnitin at least one week prior to the due date to obtain an Originality Report.

  • The Originality Report provides students with a similarity index that may indicate if plagiarism has occurred. Students will be able to make amendments to their drafts prior to their final submission on the due date.

  • Generally, one Originality Report is generated every 24 hours up to the due date.

 

Please note:

  • Students should regularly save a copy of all assignments before submission and retain the submitted version (with a save date before the due date & time - do not overwrite this copy until you have received a grade)

  • Unless there are exceptional circumstances, no assessment will be accepted after the date that the assessment has been returned to other students.

  • Students are responsible for checking that their submission has been successful and has been submitted by the due date and time.

 

University policy on grading

Assignments will be awarded grades ranging from HD to F according to guidelines set out in the University's Grading Policy: https://staff.mq.edu.au/work/strategy-planning-and-governance/university-policies-and-procedures/policies/assessment-in-effect-from-session-2-2016

The following generic grade descriptors provide university-wide standards for awarding final grades.

Grade

Descriptor

HD

(High Distinction)

Provides consistent evidence of deep and critical understanding in relation to the learning outcomes. There is substantial originality and insight in identifying, generating and communicating competing arguments, perspectives or problem solving approaches; critical evaluation of problems, their solutions and their implications; creativity in application as appropriate to the discipline.

D

(Distinction)

Provides evidence of integration and evaluation of critical ideas, principles and theories, distinctive insight and ability in applying relevant skills and concepts in relation to learning outcomes. There is demonstration of frequent originality in defining and analysing issues or problems and providing solutions; and the use of means of communication appropriate to the discipline and the audience.

Cr

(Credit)

Provides evidence of learning that goes beyond replication of content knowledge or skills relevant to the learning outcomes. There is demonstration of substantial understanding of fundamental concepts in the field of study and the ability to apply these concepts in a variety of contexts; convincing argumentation with appropriate coherent justification; communication of ideas fluently and clearly in terms of the conventions of the discipline.

P

(Pass).

Provides sufficient evidence of the achievement of learning outcomes. There is demonstration of understanding and application of fundamental concepts of the field of study; routine argumentation with acceptable justification; communication of information and ideas adequately in terms of the conventions of the discipline. The learning attainment is considered satisfactory or adequate or competent or capable in relation to the specified outcomes

F

(Fail)

Does not provide evidence of attainment of learning outcomes. There is missing or partial or superficial or faulty understanding and application of the fundamental concepts in the field of study; missing, undeveloped, inappropriate or confusing argumentation; incomplete, confusing or lacking communication of ideas in ways that give little attention to the conventions of the discipline.

 

Requesting a remark of an assignment

If you have evidence that your task has been incorrectly assessed against the grade descriptors you can request a re-mark.  To request a re-mark you need to contact  the unit convenor within 7 days of the date of return of the assignment and provide a detailed assessment of your script against the task criteria. Evidence from your assignment must be provided to support your judgements.

Note: Failed assessments can not be re-submitted as they are all double-marked as a part of the moderation process.

  • Please note: The outcome of a re-mark may be a higher/lower or unchanged grade. Grades are standards referenced and effort is NOT a criterion.

 

Academic Honesty Guidelines

All assignments should cite and provide full bibliographical details of all material that you have used to inform or support your ideas. At the Department of Educational Studies, students are required to use the American Psychological Association (APA) referencing procedures. Full details about how to cite and reference correctly can be found in Perrin (2017) and on the university's library website at https://libguides.mq.edu.au/referencing/APA .

The following guide can be purchased from the Co-op Bookshop. This is a recommended text. A copy is also available in Reserve in the Library:

Perrin, R. (2017). Pocket guide to APA style (6th ed.). Boston, MA: Cengage Learning.

 

IT IS YOUR RESPONSIBILITY TO CHECK THAT YOUR SUBMISSION HAS BEEN SUCCESSFUL AND TAKE ANY MEASURES TO ENSURE THAT YOUR ASSIGNMENT HAS BEEN SUBMITTED TO THE TURNITIN SITE BY THE DUE TIME AND DATE. YOU MUST ENSURE THAT YOU ALLOW SUFFICIENT TIME FOR YOUR ONLINE SUBMISSION TO BE PROCESSED, AS LATE SUBMISSIONS DUE TO LAST MINUTE TECHNICAL DIFFICULTIES WILL INCUR LATENESS PENALTIES. We cannot offer concessions based on a computer error; it is your responsibility to check the assignment has been lodged correctly.   

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Hurdle Due
Reading Analysis 20% No 19/8/2018
Play Environment Analysis 30% No 30/9/2018
Module 3 online quizzes 15% No Ends of weeks 8, 9, & 12
Analysis of learning potential 35% No 12/11/2018

Reading Analysis

Due: 19/8/2018
Weighting: 20%

Students are required to respond to certain aspects regarding a specified text on play


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • 1. An understanding of the characteristics of young children’s play and inquiry across different contexts
  • 2. An ability to identify and apply relevant theoretical knowledge about play and inquiry in order to address the assignment requirements.
  • 5. An ability to format and submit assignments appropriately and on time, as per instructions in the Unit Guide.
  • 6. An ability to address assignment requirements using appropriate academic written expression.
  • 7. An ability to identify key arguments in academic readings and use these appropriately to support the views expressed in assignments
  • 8. An ability to use in-text citations and construct a reference list using APA 6th style.

Play Environment Analysis

Due: 30/9/2018
Weighting: 30%

This Assessment Task requires students to provide an analysis of a play setting according to set environmental principles from the readings.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • 2. An ability to identify and apply relevant theoretical knowledge about play and inquiry in order to address the assignment requirements.
  • 3. An ability to analyse the features and potentials of young children’s play environments and materials
  • 5. An ability to format and submit assignments appropriately and on time, as per instructions in the Unit Guide.
  • 6. An ability to address assignment requirements using appropriate academic written expression.
  • 7. An ability to identify key arguments in academic readings and use these appropriately to support the views expressed in assignments
  • 8. An ability to use in-text citations and construct a reference list using APA 6th style.

Module 3 online quizzes

Due: Ends of weeks 8, 9, & 12
Weighting: 15%

This Assessment Task requires students to answer questions relating to lecture content from weeks 8-12.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • 2. An ability to identify and apply relevant theoretical knowledge about play and inquiry in order to address the assignment requirements.
  • 3. An ability to analyse the features and potentials of young children’s play environments and materials
  • 5. An ability to format and submit assignments appropriately and on time, as per instructions in the Unit Guide.

Analysis of learning potential

Due: 12/11/2018
Weighting: 35%

This Assessment Task requires an analysis of a play/inquiry scenario using all readings, with an emphasis on Module 3 content.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • 2. An ability to identify and apply relevant theoretical knowledge about play and inquiry in order to address the assignment requirements.
  • 3. An ability to analyse the features and potentials of young children’s play environments and materials
  • 4. An ability to generate ideas about play/inquiry experiences that will enhance children’s experiences and learning
  • 5. An ability to format and submit assignments appropriately and on time, as per instructions in the Unit Guide.
  • 6. An ability to address assignment requirements using appropriate academic written expression.
  • 7. An ability to identify key arguments in academic readings and use these appropriately to support the views expressed in assignments
  • 8. An ability to use in-text citations and construct a reference list using APA 6th style.

Delivery and Resources

Organising your time

Macquarie University semesters are spread over 15 weeks, which includes a 2-week non-teaching time between weeks 6 and 7. For a 3 credit-point unit, such as ECH 113, you are expected to allocate approximately 9 hours of study per week.

In the case of ECH113, this study amount would equate to approximately 135 hours over the 15 week period.  As a rough guide, this time would be broken down to:

 

 

Per Session

Average hours per tutorial

 

Weekly lectures (1 hour online) 

 

12

1

 

Weekly tutorials (internal students)

 

18

1.5

 

Required readings (completed before relevant lecture)

 

24

2hrs

 

 

 

 

 

Preparation and completion, assignment 1

10

N/A

 

Preparation and completion, assignment 2

16

N/A

 

Preparation and completion, assignment 3

10

N/A

 

Preparation and completion, assignment 4

25

N/A

 

Miscellaneous: consultation, reading unit outline, engagement with iLearn site, academic literacy support etc.

20

N/A

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total 

 

135

 

 

The above guide is an estimation only, and you can expect to vary in the amount of time that you spend per week on this unit. Also, some weeks will also be more intensive than others. You will notice the time allocated for assignment preparation. This time will allow you to read and work on your assignments progressively, rather than leaving everything to the last minute. To be successful in this unit, you should keep this time commitment in mind and organise your study program accordingly.

 

Required text and readings

There is one required text which is available from the Co-op Bookshop on campus.

Degotardi, S. (2013). ECH113 Play and Inquiry in Early Childhood: Unit Readings (3rd Edition). Sydney, Australia: Pearson. [Please note that there are significant changes in this edition from previous editions, so it will be important to obtain the 3rd edition (i.e. the one linked to here)].

It is also required that students have access to a copy of a style guide in order to reference correctly for assignments:

Perrin, R. (2017). Pocket guide to APA style (6th ed). Boston, MA: Cengage Learning. 

Other required and additional readings

You will need to access supplementary readings for your tutorial and assignment preparation:

The Required Readings are ones that you require for your tutorial and assignment preparation. These are found in an appropriately labeled folder in the Study Resources and Assignment Links section of the ECH113 iLearn website.

Additional resources are not required for tutorial preparation, but can be used for assignments help you to develop a deeper understanding of the topic. These are listed as either stimulus readings or E-reserve readings. Stimulus readings are available in an appropriately labelled folder in the Study Resources and Assignment Links section of the ECH113 iLearn website. E-reserve readings can be found via the Macquarie University library website. E-reserve readings are usually book chapters that have been converted to a pdf file for you to print or download onto your computer. These chapters plus other useful books can be found by typing ‘ECH113’ to the Multisearch function on the library homepage and then using the chapter title or author name to locate them. Please familiarise yourself with this facility as it contains some essential readings. 

Unit website

There is a website for this unit. Access to this unit is available online through iLearn, at  ilearn.mq.edu.au.   You will need to login using your Macquarie ID. This site is an essential unit resource. You are required to check this website at least twice per week for any announcements. In addition, it has the following features and functions:

Links to required readings and assignment resources

Assignment submission links: For you to submit your assignment work (DO NOT submit via the Turnitin website, use the link provided on iLearn)

Discussion forums: For you to ask any questions that pertain to other students as well as yourself. You are expected to answer other students' queries every week using this function as it consolidates your own learning and puts you in contact with other students.

Dialogue: will not be used. Email is for questions relating to yourself only. Note that questions of a general nature will not be answered. Only questions not already answered in the Unit Guide or on Discussion forums will be answered, during business hours, within 48 hours. Students need to be aware of this as assignments are generally submitted on weekends, which are not in business hours.

Please note:

  • This discussion board is a great place to respond to other students' ideas and queries and discuss approaches to the unit content. It is expected that questions posted here will be answered by other students, not staff.
  • Emailing your tutor is not a substitute for reading the unit outline and associated expectations, guidelines or information. It is not a personal ‘help-line’, but is there to support your engagement in the unit and communication with  teaching staff. Unit staff will respond to appropriate messages in a timely manner. Please be aware that we have multiple teaching and researching commitments, so may take a couple of days to respond. It is unrealistic to expect us to respond after work hours or during weekends.
  • Finally, please follow accepted modes of communication that are appropriate for an academic website.  E.g., Please use standard English in your posts and emails (don’t ‘SMS/text type’), and please consider the tone of any email or posting – respectful communications are expected, and disrespectful ones will be deleted or reported.

Unit Schedule

MODULE 1: UNDERSTANDING PLAY AND INQUIRY

Week 1: Monday 30th July.    Lecture: “Perspectives on play”

Two required readings:

1. Resource reading: Barblett, L. (2010). Why play-based learning. Every Child, 16(3), 4-5. Retrieved from http://search.informit.org/documentSummary;dn=960046192255856;res=IELHSS

2. Unit Text Readings: Jarvis, P., Brock, A., & Brown, F. (2013). Three perspectives on play. In S. Degotardi (Ed.), ECH113 Play and inquiry in early childhood: Unit readings (pp. 1-31). Sydney, Australia: Pearson Education Limited.

 

Two stimulus readings:

1. Stimulus article: Patte, M. M., & Brown, F. (2011). Playwork: a profession challenging societal factors devaluing children’s play. Journal of Student Wellbeing, 5(1), 58–70. Retrieved from http://www.ojs.unisa.edu.au/index.php/JSW

2. Stimulus article: Howe, S. (2016). What play means to us: Exploring children’s perspectives on play in an English Year 1 classroom. European Early Childhood Education Research Journal, 24(5), 748-759. doi:10.1080/1350293X.2016.1213567

 

 

Week 2: Monday 6th August. Lecture: “Inquiry-based learning”

Three required readings:

1. From textbook: Follari, L. M. (2013). The project approach: Active inquiry in early childhood. In S. Degotardi (Ed.), ECH113 Play and inquiry in early childhood: Unit readings (pp. 32-55). Sydney, Australia: Pearson Education Limited.

2. From textbook: Doherty, J., Brock, A., Brock, J. & Jarvis, P. (2013). Born to play: Babies and toddlers playing. In S. Degotardi (Ed.), ECH113 Play and inquiry in early childhood: Unit readings (pp. 56-81). Sydney, Australia: Pearson Education Limited.

3. Resource reading: Connor J. (2009). Developing an inquiring mind. Every Child, 15(4), 26‐27.

 

Three stimulus readings:

1. From textbook: Dodds, S. (2013). ‘We want to play’: Primary children at play in the classroom. In S. Degotardi (Ed.), ECH113 Play and inquiry in early childhood: Unit readings (pp. 82-107). Sydney, Australia: Pearson Education Limited. (Read only pp.89-91; i.e. from ‘Opportunities for play’ to ‘Play to develop communication skills’)

2. Stimulus article: Touhill, L. (2012). Inquiry-based learning. National Quality Standard Professional Learning Program e-Newsletter, 45, 1-4. Retrieved from http://www.earlychildhoodaustralia.org.au/

3. Stimulus article: Youngguist, J., Pataray‐Ching, J. (2004). Revisiting "play": Analyzing and articulating acts of inquiry. Early Childhood Education Journal, 31(3), 171‐178.

 

Week 3: Monday 13th August            Lecture: “Games versus play”

Two Required readings:

1. From textbook: Dodds, S. (2013). ‘We want to play’: Primary children at play in the classroom. In S. Degotardi (Ed.), ECH113 Play and inquiry in early childhood: Unit readings (pp. 82-107). Sydney, Australia: Pearson Education Limited. (read only pp.82-85; i.e. from ‘Introduction to ‘Play and the developing learner)

 

2. Resource reading: Fleet, A., Patterson, C., Robertson J. (2012). Conversations: behind early childhood pedagogical documentation. Mt Victoria, Australia: Pademelon Press. (Read only pp. 178-187)

 

One stimulus reading:

1. E-Reserve chapter (find via Multisearch): Scarlett, W. G., Naudeau, S., Salonius-Pasternak, D., & Ponte, I. (2005). Organized youth sports. In W. G. Scarlett, S. Naudeau, D. Salonius-Pasternak, & I. Ponte (Eds.), Children's play (pp. 137-158). London, England: Sage.

 

Assignment 1 due 11:59pm Sunday 19th August

 

MODULE 2: CONTEXTS OF PLAY AND INQUIRY

 

Week 4: Monday 20th August.           Lecture: “Materials and resources for play and inquiry”

Three Required readings:

1. E-reserve reading: Curtis, D. & Carter, M. (2008). Enhance the curriculum with materials. In D. Curtis & M. Carter, Learning together with young children: A curriculum framework for reflective teachers (pp. 55-84). St Paul, MN: Redleaf.

2. Resource reading: Touhill, L. (2011). Landscapes for learning. Rattler, 97, 20-23. Retrieved from http://ccccnsw.org.au

3. Resource reading: Australian Competition & Consumer Commission (2005). Safe toys for kids. Dickson, Australia: Commonwealth of Australia. Retrieved from http://www.cbs.sa.gov.au/assets/files/safetoys.pdf

 

Stimulus reading:

1. Stimulus article: Curtis, D. & Carter, M. (2014). Provoke wonder, curiosity, and intellectual challenge. In D. Curtis & M. Carter (eds.). Designs for living and learning: Transforming early childhood environments (pp. 152- 187).  St Paul, MN: Redleaf.

2.  Stimulus chapter: Dutton, D. (2014). A Darwinian theory of beauty. Philosophy and Literature, 38(1A), 314-318. doi:10.1353/phl.2014.0045

 

Week 5: Monday 27th August Lecture: “Playing outside”

NOTE (internal students): practical preparation for Assignment 2 will be completed in this week's tutorial. External students will complete practical preparation during On-Campus Day 1

 

Two required readings:

1. From textbook: Perry, J.P. (2013). Outdoor play. In S. Degotardi (Ed.), ECH113 Play and inquiry in early childhood: Unit readings (pp. 133-160). Sydney, Australia: Pearson Education Limited.

2. Resource reading: Young, T., & Elliot, S. (2013b). Rethinking outdoor learning environments: Part B: Provisions. National Quality Standard (NQS) Professional Learning Program (PLP) e-¬‐newsletter, 60, 1‐5. Retrieved from: http://www.earlychildhoodaustralia.org.au/nqsplp/e‐newsletters/newsletters-¬‐56-¬‐60/newsletter-¬‐60/

 

Three stimulus readings:

1. Stimulus article: Young, T., & Elliot, S. (2013a). Rethinking outdoor learning environments: Part A: Provocations. National Quality Standard (NQS) Professional Learning Program (PLP) e-¬‐newsletter, 59, 1‐4. Retrieved from: http://www.earlychildhoodaustralia.org.au/nqsplp/e‐newsletters/newsletters-¬‐56-¬‐60/newsletter-¬‐59/

2. Stimulus article: Galizio, C. Stoll, J. & Hutchins, P. (2009). “We Need a Way to Get to the Other Side!” Exploring the Possibilities for Learning in Natural Spaces. Young Children, 64(4), 42-48.

3. Stimulus article: Robertson, J. (2011). Who needs a forest? Rattler, 99, 10-13

 

 

Week 6: Monday 3rd September.      Lecture: “Extending and enhancing play and inquiry”

Two required readings:

1. From textbook: Van Hoorn, J., Nourot, P.M., Scales, B., & Alward, K.R. (2013a). Orchestrating play: Interactions with children. In S. Degotardi (Ed.), ECH113 Play and inquiry in early childhood: Unit readings (pp. 162-187). Sydney, Australia: Pearson Education Limited.

2. Resource reading: Cheeseman, S. (2012). Responding to children’s play. National Quality Standard (NQS) Professional Learning Program (PLP) e-¬‐newsletter, 34, 1‐4. Retrieved from: http://www.earlychildhoodaustralia.org.au/nqsplp/

 

Two stimulus readings:

1. From textbook: Olusoga,Y. (2013). ‘We don’t play like that here’: Social, cultural and gender perspectives on play. In S. Degotardi (Ed.), ECH113 Play and inquiry in early childhood: Unit readings (pp. 108-132). Sydney, Australia: Pearson Education Limited. (read only pp.110-116; ie. From ‘Social theories of learning …’ to ‘Cultural-historical theories of …’)

2. Stimulus reading: Dombro, A. L., Jablon, J R. & Stetson, C. (2011). Powerful interactions. Young Children, 66(1), 12-16. Retrieved from http://www.jstor.org/stable/42730691

 

 

 

Week 7: Monday 10th September.    Lecture: “Play in diverse contexts”

Two required readings:

1. From textbook: Olusoga,Y. (2013). ‘We don’t play like that here’: Social, cultural and gender perspectives on play. In S. Degotardi (Ed.), ECH113 Play and inquiry in early childhood: Unit readings (pp. 108-132). Sydney: Pearson Education Limited. (Read pp. 108-110; i.e. up to ‘Social theories of learning …’ and then pp. 116-132; i.e. from ‘Cultural-historical theories …’ to chapter end).

2. Required reading: Lancy, D. F. (2007). Accounting for variability in mother–child play. American Anthropologist, 109(2), 273–284. doi:10.1525/aa.2007.109.2.273

 

One stimulus reading:

1. Stimulus article: Shine, S., & Acosta, T. Y. (2000). Parent-Child Social Play in a Children's Museum. Family Relations, 49(1), 45-52. Retrieved from http://www.jstor.org/stable/585700

 

Mon 17th September–Fri 28th September: Mid-Session Break

Thursday 20th September: On-campus Day 1 (external students only)

Assignment 2 due 11:59pm Sunday 30th September

             

 

MODULE 3: OPPORTUNITIES FOR DEVELOPMENT AND LEARNING

Week 8: Monday 31st September                  Lecture: “Imagination and creativity”

Two required readings:

1. From textbook: Van Hoorn, J., Nourot, P. M., Scales, B., & Alward, K. R. (2013b). Play as the cornerstone of development: The literature. In S.Degotardi (Ed.), ECH113 Play and inquiry in early childhood: Unit readings (pp. 212-232). Sydney, Australia: Pearson Education Limited. (Read only pp.212-217; i.e. from Chapter start to ‘Play and the development of language and literacy’ and then pp.220-227; from ‘Play and logical-mathematical thinking’ to ‘Play and social-moral development’)

2. E-reserve reading: Jalongo, M R., & Narey, M. J. (2014). Understanding children's creative thought and expression. In J. P. Isenberg & M. R. Jalongo, Creative thinking and arts-based learning: Preschool through fourth grade (6th ed., pp. 2-19). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson [Read only pp. 2- 19]

 

Three stimulus readings:

1. Resource reading: Saracho, O. (2002). Young children's creativity and pretend play. Early Child Development and Care, 172(5), 431-438. doi:10.1080/03004430214553

2. Stimulus article: Leong, D. J., & Bodrova, E. (2012). Assessing and Scaffolding Make-Believe Play. YC Young Children, 67(1), 28-34. Retrieved from www.naeyc.org/yc

3. Weblink: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sQb95itdoCM

 

Note: Assignment 3 (Quiz 1) due end of this week.

 

Week 9: Monday 8th October                        Lecture: “Language and literacy in play”

Two required readings:

1. From textbook: Van Hoorn, J., Nourot, P. M., Scales, B., & Alward, K. R. (2013b). Play as the cornerstone of development: The literature. In S. Degotardi (Ed.), ECH113 Play and inquiry in early childhood: Unit readings (pp. 212-232). Sydney, Australia: Pearson Education Limited. (Read only pp.217-220; i.e. from ‘Play and the development of language and literacy’ to ‘Play and logical-mathematical thinking’)

2. From textbook: Doherty, J., Brock, A., Brock, J. & Jarvis, P. (2013). Born to play: Babies and toddlers playing. In S. Degotardi (Ed.), ECH113 Play and inquiry in early childhood: Unit readings (pp. 56-81). Sydney, Australia: Pearson Education Limited. (Re-read pp. 74-76)

 

 

Two stimulus readings:

1. Stimulus article: Collins, K.M. and Griess, C. (2011). It’s all in the game: Designing and playing board games as a means of fostering the many ways children communicate. YC Young Children, 12-19. Retrieved from http://www.naeyc.org/yc

2. Stimulus article: Blake, S. (2009). Engage, Investigate, and Report: Enhancing the Curriculum with Scientific Inquiry. YC Young Children, 64(6), 49-53. Retrieved from http://www.jstor.org/stable/42731050

 

            Weeks 10 & 11: Professional Experience break (For all ECH113 students, regardless of enrolment in PE unit)

Note: Assignment 3 (Quiz 2) due end of this week.

 

 

Week 12: Monday 29th Oct.               Lecture: “Physical wellbeing and development in play”

Two required readings:

1. E-reserve: Wyver, S., Tranter, P., Sandseter, E.B.H., Naughton, G., Little, H., Bundy, A., Ragen, J., & Engelen, L. (2012). Places to play outdoors: Sedentary and safe or active and risky? In P. Whiteman & K. De Gioia, (Eds.). Children and childhoods: Contemporary perspectives, places and practices (pp. 85-107). Newcastle upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Publishing.

2. Adolph, K. E., & Robinson, S. R. (2015). Motor Development. In L. Liben & U. Muller (Eds.), Handbook of Child Psychology and Developmental Science (7th ed., Vol. 2: Cognitive processes, pp. 113-157). New York, NY: John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Retrieved from https://ebookcentral-proquest-com.simsrad.net.ocs.mq.edu.au/lib/MQU/reader.action?docID=1895801&ppg=141 [Read only pp. 120–124; From “Stereotypies and Flails” until “Variability: Problem and Promise”]

 

Two stimulus readings:

1. E-Reserve: Luchs, A. (2017). Assessing free play behaviour in urban play spaces. In T. Waller, E. Ärlemalm-Hagsér, E. Hansen-Sandseter, L. Lee-Hammond, K. Lekies, & S. Wyver (Eds.), The SAGE Handbook of Outdoor Play and Learning (pp. 264-278). London, England: Sage. Retrieved from https://ebookcentral-proquest-com.simsrad.net.ocs.mq.edu.au/lib/MQU/reader.action?docID=4880686&ppg=293.

2. Weblink: http://sydney.edu.au/health-sciences/sydney-playground-project/

Note: Assignment 3 (Quiz 3) due end of this week.

 

 

Week 13: Monday 5th Nov.                Lecture: “Social development and relationships”

Three required readings:

1. E-reserve reading: Degotardi, S. & Pearson, E (2016). Infant play: how interactions build and support relationships. In M. Ebbeck and M. Waniganayeke (Eds.), Children’s play in early childhood education: Facilitating learning in diverse contexts (2nd ed., pp. 76-95). Sydney, Australia: Oxford University Press.

2. From textbook: Van Hoorn, J., Nourot, P. M., Scales, B., & Alward, K. R. (2013b). Play as the cornerstone of development: The literature. In S. Degotardi (Ed.), ECH113 Play and inquiry in early childhood: Unit readings (pp. 212-232). Sydney, Australia: Pearson Education Limited. (Read pp.227-232; From ‘Play and social-moral development’ to chapter end)

3. Resource reading: Broadhead, P. (2010). Building friendship through playful learning in the early years. In J. Moyles, The Excellence of play (3rd Ed., pp. 216-228). Maidenhead, England: Open University Press.

 

One stimulus reading:

1. Stimulus article: De-Souza, D., & Radell, J. (2011). Superheroes: An opportunity for prosocial play. YC Young Children, 66(4), 26-31. Retrieved from http://www.jstor.org/stable/42731050

Saturday 3rd November: On-campus Day 2 (external students only)

ASSIGNMENT 4 due 11:59pm Monday 12th Nov.

 

Policies and Procedures

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central (https://staff.mq.edu.au/work/strategy-planning-and-governance/university-policies-and-procedures/policy-central). Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Undergraduate students seeking more policy resources can visit the Student Policy Gateway (https://students.mq.edu.au/support/study/student-policy-gateway). It is your one-stop-shop for the key policies you need to know about throughout your undergraduate student journey.

If you would like to see all the policies relevant to Learning and Teaching visit Policy Central (https://staff.mq.edu.au/work/strategy-planning-and-governance/university-policies-and-procedures/policy-central).

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/study/getting-started/student-conduct​

Results

Results shown in iLearn, or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent. For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au.

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Learning Skills

Learning Skills (mq.edu.au/learningskills) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to improve your marks and take control of your study.

Student Enquiry Service

For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at ask.mq.edu.au

Equity Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

IT Help

For help with University computer systems and technology, visit http://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/information_technology/help/

When using the University's IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use of IT Resources Policy. The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network including students.

Graduate Capabilities

Problem Solving and Research Capability

Our graduates should be capable of researching; of analysing, and interpreting and assessing data and information in various forms; of drawing connections across fields of knowledge; and they should be able to relate their knowledge to complex situations at work or in the world, in order to diagnose and solve problems. We want them to have the confidence to take the initiative in doing so, within an awareness of their own limitations.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • 1. An understanding of the characteristics of young children’s play and inquiry across different contexts
  • 2. An ability to identify and apply relevant theoretical knowledge about play and inquiry in order to address the assignment requirements.
  • 3. An ability to analyse the features and potentials of young children’s play environments and materials
  • 4. An ability to generate ideas about play/inquiry experiences that will enhance children’s experiences and learning
  • 6. An ability to address assignment requirements using appropriate academic written expression.
  • 7. An ability to identify key arguments in academic readings and use these appropriately to support the views expressed in assignments

Assessment tasks

  • Reading Analysis
  • Play Environment Analysis
  • Module 3 online quizzes
  • Analysis of learning potential

Effective Communication

We want to develop in our students the ability to communicate and convey their views in forms effective with different audiences. We want our graduates to take with them the capability to read, listen, question, gather and evaluate information resources in a variety of formats, assess, write clearly, speak effectively, and to use visual communication and communication technologies as appropriate.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • 5. An ability to format and submit assignments appropriately and on time, as per instructions in the Unit Guide.
  • 6. An ability to address assignment requirements using appropriate academic written expression.
  • 7. An ability to identify key arguments in academic readings and use these appropriately to support the views expressed in assignments
  • 8. An ability to use in-text citations and construct a reference list using APA 6th style.

Assessment tasks

  • Reading Analysis
  • Play Environment Analysis
  • Module 3 online quizzes
  • Analysis of learning potential

Commitment to Continuous Learning

Our graduates will have enquiring minds and a literate curiosity which will lead them to pursue knowledge for its own sake. They will continue to pursue learning in their careers and as they participate in the world. They will be capable of reflecting on their experiences and relationships with others and the environment, learning from them, and growing - personally, professionally and socially.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • 3. An ability to analyse the features and potentials of young children’s play environments and materials
  • 4. An ability to generate ideas about play/inquiry experiences that will enhance children’s experiences and learning
  • 5. An ability to format and submit assignments appropriately and on time, as per instructions in the Unit Guide.
  • 8. An ability to use in-text citations and construct a reference list using APA 6th style.

Assessment tasks

  • Reading Analysis
  • Play Environment Analysis
  • Module 3 online quizzes
  • Analysis of learning potential

Discipline Specific Knowledge and Skills

Our graduates will take with them the intellectual development, depth and breadth of knowledge, scholarly understanding, and specific subject content in their chosen fields to make them competent and confident in their subject or profession. They will be able to demonstrate, where relevant, professional technical competence and meet professional standards. They will be able to articulate the structure of knowledge of their discipline, be able to adapt discipline-specific knowledge to novel situations, and be able to contribute from their discipline to inter-disciplinary solutions to problems.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • 1. An understanding of the characteristics of young children’s play and inquiry across different contexts
  • 2. An ability to identify and apply relevant theoretical knowledge about play and inquiry in order to address the assignment requirements.
  • 3. An ability to analyse the features and potentials of young children’s play environments and materials
  • 4. An ability to generate ideas about play/inquiry experiences that will enhance children’s experiences and learning

Assessment tasks

  • Reading Analysis
  • Play Environment Analysis
  • Module 3 online quizzes
  • Analysis of learning potential

Critical, Analytical and Integrative Thinking

We want our graduates to be capable of reasoning, questioning and analysing, and to integrate and synthesise learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments; to be able to critique constraints, assumptions and limitations; to be able to think independently and systemically in relation to scholarly activity, in the workplace, and in the world. We want them to have a level of scientific and information technology literacy.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • 1. An understanding of the characteristics of young children’s play and inquiry across different contexts
  • 2. An ability to identify and apply relevant theoretical knowledge about play and inquiry in order to address the assignment requirements.
  • 3. An ability to analyse the features and potentials of young children’s play environments and materials
  • 4. An ability to generate ideas about play/inquiry experiences that will enhance children’s experiences and learning
  • 6. An ability to address assignment requirements using appropriate academic written expression.
  • 7. An ability to identify key arguments in academic readings and use these appropriately to support the views expressed in assignments

Assessment tasks

  • Reading Analysis
  • Play Environment Analysis
  • Module 3 online quizzes
  • Analysis of learning potential

Creative and Innovative

Our graduates will also be capable of creative thinking and of creating knowledge. They will be imaginative and open to experience and capable of innovation at work and in the community. We want them to be engaged in applying their critical, creative thinking.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • 1. An understanding of the characteristics of young children’s play and inquiry across different contexts
  • 2. An ability to identify and apply relevant theoretical knowledge about play and inquiry in order to address the assignment requirements.
  • 3. An ability to analyse the features and potentials of young children’s play environments and materials
  • 4. An ability to generate ideas about play/inquiry experiences that will enhance children’s experiences and learning

Assessment tasks

  • Reading Analysis
  • Play Environment Analysis
  • Module 3 online quizzes
  • Analysis of learning potential

Socially and Environmentally Active and Responsible

We want our graduates to be aware of and have respect for self and others; to be able to work with others as a leader and a team player; to have a sense of connectedness with others and country; and to have a sense of mutual obligation. Our graduates should be informed and active participants in moving society towards sustainability.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • 1. An understanding of the characteristics of young children’s play and inquiry across different contexts
  • 4. An ability to generate ideas about play/inquiry experiences that will enhance children’s experiences and learning
  • 5. An ability to format and submit assignments appropriately and on time, as per instructions in the Unit Guide.

Assessment tasks

  • Reading Analysis
  • Play Environment Analysis
  • Module 3 online quizzes
  • Analysis of learning potential

Changes from Previous Offering

The range of assessment tasks is similar to 2014, however specific readings/scenarios etc for each assignment have been updated and changed. 

Changes since First Published

Date Description
12/09/2018 The date listed for On Campus Session was 19th Sept whereas it was listed elsewhere as 20th - this date has been updated in the "unit schedule" section now to reflect this correction