Logo Students

CBMS208 – Chemical Analysis I

2017 – S2 Day

General Information

Pdf icon Download as PDF
Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff Lecturer
Danny Wong
Contact via danny.wong@mq.edu.au
F7B 235
Credit points Credit points
3
Prerequisites Prerequisites
CBMS101(Cr) or CBMS102
Corequisites Corequisites
Co-badged status Co-badged status
CBMS608
Unit description Unit description
The measurement of chemical composition is a necessary requirement for forensic science, local and international trade, manufacture and production, government regulatory agencies, biotechnology, and nearly every field of science. Thus, an understanding of the principles of chemical analysis is an essential part of any scientist's education. This unit is designed to serve the needs of students majoring in chemical, biomolecular, environmental, earth and medical sciences. The unit introduces the principles of chemical analysis that enable the separation, detection, identification and quantification of the chemical matter found in a variety of samples. Such samples may range from those associated with forensic science such as drugs in biological tissue to contaminants in river systems, soils and the general environment, to heavy metals in ores and alloys, to neurochemicals present in a single neuron. Topics include: statistical analysis of chemical data; sampling methods; all modes of chromatographic separation with applications to environmental and biotechnological issues; methods of flow analysis of environmental and biological samples; ion-selective electrodes; potentiometric titration; titrimetry and buffer solutions. Understanding of these techniques is reinforced with practical, hands-on experience using instrumentation in our well-equipped analytical teaching laboratory.

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at http://students.mq.edu.au/student_admin/enrolmentguide/academicdates/

Learning Outcomes

  1. To display competency in executing some commonly used analytical techniques;
  2. To perform basic analytical experiments with awareness of uncertainty in measurements;
  3. To interpret and draw sound conclusions from analytical chemical data obtained;
  4. To prepare written scientific documents at a satisfactory level;
  5. To develop fundamental interpersonal skills during laboratory sessions.

General Assessment Information

Students who perform well in this unit:

  1. will have actively participated in ALL laboratory session and completed ALL of the of the assessable items. They will also have taken into account feedback and advice given during the laboratory sessions to improve their performance in these activities throughout the session.
  2. will have seen improvement in grades throughout session through active engagement. Strong engagement usually results in better understanding of the theory which results in a strong performance in the final exam.

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Due
Final 3 hour examination 50% University Examination Period
Assignments 15% Fortnightly
Laboratory work 35% 2 Weeks after each Lab session

Final 3 hour examination

Due: University Examination Period
Weighting: 50%

The final examination will be 3 hours in length and will cover all sections of the unit (lectures, tutorial problems, assignments and laboratory exercises).


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • To interpret and draw sound conclusions from analytical chemical data obtained;

Assignments

Due: Fortnightly
Weighting: 15%

The  assignments  are  designed  to aid in  learning  the  material  during  the session, rather than trying to cram on the day before the examination.  They are relatively low risk (a small component of the aggregate score) but they are very valuable for you as measures of your understanding of the topics. Assignments are performed online.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • To display competency in executing some commonly used analytical techniques;
  • To interpret and draw sound conclusions from analytical chemical data obtained;

Laboratory work

Due: 2 Weeks after each Lab session
Weighting: 35%

The laboratory sessions provide an opportunity for putting the materials acquired in lectures into practice.  They will provide concrete expositions of theory.  They also provide the opportunity for developing bench, data collection and data analysis skills.  Preparation of written reports based on experimental results obtained will develop some communication skills in the chemistry context.

 


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • To display competency in executing some commonly used analytical techniques;
  • To perform basic analytical experiments with awareness of uncertainty in measurements;
  • To interpret and draw sound conclusions from analytical chemical data obtained;
  • To prepare written scientific documents at a satisfactory level;
  • To develop fundamental interpersonal skills during laboratory sessions.

Delivery and Resources

Classes

Timetable: Please check http://www.timetables.mq.edu.au/ for the official timetable of the unit.

Lectures: The material presented in the lectures is important and you should not assume that all examinable material is available in the textbook or in printed notes. On the other hand, do not assume that all examinable material is to be found in the lecture notes.

Tutorial: There are three optional tutorial sessions organised in this unit.

Laboratory Work: A general preparatory workshop for laboratory work will be held in Week 1.  Laboratory sessions commence in Week 2. You will undertake five experiments in the 2nd / 3rd Year Teaching Laboratories.

Required and Recommended Texts and/or Materials

Prescribed text:

  • D.C.Harris, Quantitative Chemical Analysis, 9th Edition plus Sapling Access, Macmillan Publishing (2015). ISBN: 9781319044053.
  • NOTE: You must purchase the textbook Sapling bundle (available from Co-op Bookshop). The textbook alone is not sufficient as Assignments are distributed through, and require access to, Sapling.

Recommended references (all available in University Library)

  • D.A.Skoog, D.M.West, F.J.Holler, S.R.Crouch, Fundamentals of Analytical Chemistry, 9th Edition, Brooks/Cole, Thomson Learning, Inc (2014).
  • D.C.Harris, Exploring Chemical Analysis, W.H.Freeman & Company (1997).
  • H.H.Willard, L.L.Merritt, Jr., J.A.Dean, F.A.Settle, Jr., Instrumental Methods of Analysis, 7th Edition, Wadworth Publishing Company (1988).
  • D.A.Skoog, F.J.Holler and T.A.Nieman, Principles of Instrumental Analysis, 5th Edition, Saunders College Publishing (1998).
  • J.F.Rubinson and K.A.Rubinson, Contemporary Chemical Analysis, Prentice Hall (1998).

If you feel you need to strengthen your mathematical skills, you might like to refer to Maths for Chemistry – A Chemist’s toolkit of calculations, P.Monk, Oxford University Press (2006).

A useful guidebook for studying science subjects is Essential Skills for Science and Technology, P.Zeegers, K.Deller-Evans, S.Egege, C.Klinger, Oxford University Press (2008).

Technology Used and Required

The web page for this unit can be found at: http://ilearn.mq.edu.au

Lecture notes will be available on the Web for downloading one week prior to the scheduled lecture. You are strongly encouraged to make use the discussion forum available on the CBMS208 website for general discussion of materials presented in this unit.

Teaching and Learning Strategy

Students are required to attend lectures and laboratory classes. Active participation by the students in all of these fora is expected. This means that you are expected to ask questions during lectures, and particularly in laboratory sessions. Learning is an active process, and as such, you must engage with the material. This means reading the textbook (and beyond) before and after lectures, attempt the assignment questions and other questions, discuss the concepts with your classmates and lecturers. Do not be afraid to ask questions – your classmates will probably want to ask the same thing.

Assignment questions are issued so that you will have the opportunity to use the information provided in the lectures and textbook and to test your degree of understanding of those topics.

Laboratory exercises are designed to provide a concrete example of the abstract topics covered in the course work, and to give you the opportunity to discover the principles and applications for yourself. Laboratory exercises also offer the opportunity to explore the uncertainty inherent in scientific investigations and the limitations of models and theories by allowing comparison with real systems.

Unit Schedule

Note: This schedule in tenative and may be subject to change

Week

Week starting

Monday 9 am

Monday 11 am

Thursday 4 pm

LABORATORY

9am – 1pm/ 2 – 6 pm

E7B 349

1

July 31 

Introduction, Statistics

Statistics

Statistics

Workshop (E7B 346 or F7B 322)

2

August 7

Statistics

Statistics

Statistics

Experiment 1 (E7B 349)

3

August 14

Statistics

Sampling methods

Sampling methods

Experiment 2 (E7B 349)

4

August 21

Titrimetry

Titrimetry

Titrimetry

5

August 28

Titrimetry

Titrimetry

Titrimetry

Experiment 3 (E7B 349)

6

September 4

Flow injection

Flow injection

Flow injection

Optional Tutorial

7

September 11

Flow injection

Electroanalytical chemistry

Electroanalytical chemistry

Experiment 4(i) / 4(ii) / 5

 

Mid-Session Break (September 18 – September 29)

8

October 2

No Lecture Labour Day holiday

No Lecture Labour Day holiday

Electroanalytical chemistry

Experiment 4(i) / 4(ii) / 5

9

October 9

Electroanalytical chemistry

Electroanalytical chemistry

Electroanalytical chemistry

Optional Tutorial

10

October 16

Electroanalytical chemistry

Chromatography

Chromatography

Experiment 4(i) / 4(ii) / 5

11

October 23

Chromatography

Chromatography

Chromatography

12

October 30

Chromatography

Chromatography

Chromatography

Experiment 4(i) / 4(ii) / 5

13

November 6

Chromatography

Chromatography Optional Tutorial

Optional Tutorial

Policies and Procedures

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central. Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Academic Honesty Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/academic_honesty/policy.html

Assessment Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/assessment/policy_2016.html

Grade Appeal Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/gradeappeal/policy.html

Complaint Management Procedure for Students and Members of the Public http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/complaint_management/procedure.html​

Disruption to Studies Policy http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/disruption_studies/policy.html The Disruption to Studies Policy is effective from March 3 2014 and replaces the Special Consideration Policy.

In addition, a number of other policies can be found in the Learning and Teaching Category of Policy Central.

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/support/student_conduct/

Results

Results shown in iLearn, or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent. For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au.

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Learning Skills

Learning Skills (mq.edu.au/learningskills) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to improve your marks and take control of your study.

Student Enquiry Service

For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at ask.mq.edu.au

Equity Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

IT Help

For help with University computer systems and technology, visit http://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/information_technology/help/

When using the University's IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use of IT Resources Policy. The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network including students.

Graduate Capabilities

Discipline Specific Knowledge and Skills

Our graduates will take with them the intellectual development, depth and breadth of knowledge, scholarly understanding, and specific subject content in their chosen fields to make them competent and confident in their subject or profession. They will be able to demonstrate, where relevant, professional technical competence and meet professional standards. They will be able to articulate the structure of knowledge of their discipline, be able to adapt discipline-specific knowledge to novel situations, and be able to contribute from their discipline to inter-disciplinary solutions to problems.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • To display competency in executing some commonly used analytical techniques;
  • To perform basic analytical experiments with awareness of uncertainty in measurements;
  • To prepare written scientific documents at a satisfactory level;

Assessment tasks

  • Final 3 hour examination
  • Assignments
  • Laboratory work

Problem Solving and Research Capability

Our graduates should be capable of researching; of analysing, and interpreting and assessing data and information in various forms; of drawing connections across fields of knowledge; and they should be able to relate their knowledge to complex situations at work or in the world, in order to diagnose and solve problems. We want them to have the confidence to take the initiative in doing so, within an awareness of their own limitations.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • To interpret and draw sound conclusions from analytical chemical data obtained;
  • To prepare written scientific documents at a satisfactory level;

Assessment tasks

  • Assignments
  • Laboratory work

Socially and Environmentally Active and Responsible

We want our graduates to be aware of and have respect for self and others; to be able to work with others as a leader and a team player; to have a sense of connectedness with others and country; and to have a sense of mutual obligation. Our graduates should be informed and active participants in moving society towards sustainability.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • To develop fundamental interpersonal skills during laboratory sessions.

Critical, Analytical and Integrative Thinking

We want our graduates to be capable of reasoning, questioning and analysing, and to integrate and synthesise learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments; to be able to critique constraints, assumptions and limitations; to be able to think independently and systemically in relation to scholarly activity, in the workplace, and in the world. We want them to have a level of scientific and information technology literacy.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • To perform basic analytical experiments with awareness of uncertainty in measurements;
  • To interpret and draw sound conclusions from analytical chemical data obtained;
  • To prepare written scientific documents at a satisfactory level;

Assessment tasks

  • Final 3 hour examination
  • Assignments
  • Laboratory work

Effective Communication

We want to develop in our students the ability to communicate and convey their views in forms effective with different audiences. We want our graduates to take with them the capability to read, listen, question, gather and evaluate information resources in a variety of formats, assess, write clearly, speak effectively, and to use visual communication and communication technologies as appropriate.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • To prepare written scientific documents at a satisfactory level;
  • To develop fundamental interpersonal skills during laboratory sessions.

Assessment task

  • Laboratory work