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PHIX262 – Body and Mind

2017 – SP1 OUA

General Information

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Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff OUA Convenor
Jennifer Duke-Yonge
Contact via jennifer.duke-yonge@mq.edu.au or (+61 2 9850 8826)
W6A 722
Monday 1-2, or by arrangement
Tutor
TBA
Contact via via Dialogue tool in iLearn
Jennifer Duke-Yonge
Prerequisites Prerequisites
Corequisites Corequisites
Co-badged status Co-badged status
Unit description Unit description
This unit explores the relationship between the body and the mind. It introduces students to the central issues in contemporary philosophy of mind, focusing on the issue of whether the mind can be incorporated into the scientific picture of the world. The first part of the unit consists of a survey of competing philosophical theories of the mind: dualism, behaviourism, the identity theory, and functionalism. The second half consists of a discussion of some topical issues in contemporary philosophy of mind and cognitive science. What is the nature of phenomenal (subjective) experience? What is consciousness? Is a physical theory of consciousness possible? What is the role of the body in cognitive processes? All enrolment queries should be directed to Open Universities Australia (OUA): see www.open.edu.au

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at https://www.open.edu.au/student-admin-and-support/key-dates/

Learning Outcomes

  1. Learn basic theories and approaches in philosophy of mind
  2. Learn to express your opinion and interpretations of philosophical readings
  3. Learn to close-read and evaluate a philosophical text
  4. Learn to write an argument and essay

General Assessment Information

In philosophy, academic honesty is taken very seriously. Misrepresenting other's work as your own may be grounds for referral to the Faculty Disciplinary Committee. If you have questions about how to properly cite work or how to credit sources, please talk to one of the teaching staff and see also the  Academic Honesty Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/academic_honesty/policy.html

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Hurdle Due
Participation 15% No Throughout
Online quizzes 15% No Sunday, Week 5, 9 & 13
First essay 30% No Sun 23/4 (in mid-term break)
Final essay 40% No Sun 11/6 (Wk13)

Participation

Due: Throughout
Weighting: 15%

Participation marks will be based on engagement in online forums. Your participation will be assessed based on your willingness to engage and the quality of your engagement. Assessment criteria will be engagement with the learning community, engagement with content, and consistency and commitment.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Learn basic theories and approaches in philosophy of mind
  • Learn to express your opinion and interpretations of philosophical readings

Online quizzes

Due: Sunday, Week 5, 9 & 13
Weighting: 15%

Three short online quizzes (10 multiple choice questions) in which you answer a number of questions. The quizzes are due in week 5, 9 and 13. The criteria for assessment is the selection of the correct answer from the choices provided. Each quiz will be open from 9am Monday until 11.59pm Sunday of the relevant week. 


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Learn basic theories and approaches in philosophy of mind

First essay

Due: Sun 23/4 (in mid-term break)
Weighting: 30%

You will write a short 1000 word essay on one of the topics discussed during the first half of the course. These topics include Cartesian dualism, behaviorism, functionalism, identity theory, and nonreductive physicalism. Your essay should be submitted online via Turnitin. Assessment criteria are: Focus, Structure, Exposition, Argument. A rubric will be available in iLearn. 


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Learn basic theories and approaches in philosophy of mind
  • Learn to close-read and evaluate a philosophical text
  • Learn to write an argument and essay

Final essay

Due: Sun 11/6 (Wk13)
Weighting: 40%

You will write a 1500-2000 word essay on one of the topics discussed during the second half of the course. These topics include consciousness, situated cognition, embodied cognition, extended and distributed cognition. Your essay should be submitted online via Turnitin. Assessment criteria are: Focus, Structure, Exposition, Argument. A rubric will be available in iLearn. 


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Learn basic theories and approaches in philosophy of mind
  • Learn to close-read and evaluate a philosophical text
  • Learn to write an argument and essay

Delivery and Resources

The textbook for this unit is :

John Heil. (2013). Philosophy of mind: A contemporary introduction (3rd edition). Routlegde. 

You will need to purchase a copy of this book as soon as possible (http://www.coop-bookshop.com.au)

Additional essential readings will be available electronically through the Macquarie University Library, with links from iLearn. 

Unit Schedule

Important schedule information: Please note that OUA units offered by Macquarie University now follow Macquarie Sessions rather than OUA Study Periods. This will include a mid-session break of two weeks. You will find the Session dates here:

https://www.open.edu.au/student-admin-and-support/key-dates-2017/

 

Week

Topic

Readings

1

Course introduction

Heil ch 1

2

Cartesian dualism

Heil ch 2 & 3

3

Behaviorism

Heil ch 4

4

Identity theory

Heil ch 5

5

Functionalism

Heil ch 6

6

Nonreductive physicalism

Heil ch 11

7

Consciousness

Heil ch 10

8

Consciousness and the brain

Excerpt from the Stanford encyclopedia of Philosophy entry on Consciousness

9

Representational theory of mind

Heil ch 7

10

Situated cognition

Clark, A. (2001). Cognitive Technology: Beyond the Naked Brain. In Mindware: An Introduction to the Philosophy of Cognitive Science. Oxford University Press.

 

11

Embodied cognition

M.L. Anderson. (2005). How to study the mind: An introduction to embodied cognition. In: F. Santoianni, C. Sabatano (Eds.), Brain Development in Learning Environments: Embodied and Perceptual Advancements. Cambridge University Press.

12

Extended and distributed cognition

Clark, A. & Chalmers, D. (1998). The extended mind. Analysis, 58, 10-23.

Hutchins, E. (2001) Cognition, Distributed. In R. A. Wilson & F. C. Keil (Eds.). The MIT Encyclopedia of the Cognitive Sciences. MIT Press.

Policies and Procedures

Late Submission - applies unless otherwise stated elsewhere in the unit guide

Unless a Special Consideration request has been submitted and approved, (a) a penalty for lateness will apply – two (2) marks out of 100 will be deducted per day for assignments submitted after the due date – and (b) no assignment will be accepted more than seven (7) days (incl. weekends) after the original submission deadline. No late submissions will be accepted for timed assessments – e.g. quizzes, online tests.

Extension Request

Special Consideration Policy and Procedure (https://staff.mq.edu.au/work/strategy-planning-and-governance/university-policies-and-procedures/policies/special-consideration)

The University recognises that students may experience events or conditions that adversely affect their academic performance. If you experience serious and unavoidable difficulties at exam time or when assessment tasks are due, you can consider applying for Special Consideration.

You need to show that the circumstances:

  1. were serious, unexpected and unavoidable
  2. were beyond your control
  3. caused substantial disruption to your academic work
  4. substantially interfered with your otherwise satisfactory fulfilment of the unit requirements
  5. lasted at least three consecutive days or a total of 5 days within the teaching period and prevented completion of an assessment task scheduled for a specific date.

If you feel that your studies have been impacted submit an application as follows:

  1. Visit Ask MQ and use your OneID to log in
  2. Fill in your relevant details
  3. Attach supporting documents by clicking 'Add a reply', click 'Browse' and navigating to the files you want to attach, then click 'Submit Form' to send your notification and supporting documents
  4. Please keep copies of your original documents, as they may be requested in the future as part of the assessment process

Outcome

Once your submission is assessed, an appropriate outcome will be organised.

OUA Specific Policies and Procedures

Withdrawal from a unit after the census date

You can withdraw from your subjects prior to the census date (last day to withdraw). If you successfully withdraw before the census date, you won’t need to apply for Special Circumstances. If you find yourself unable to withdraw from your subjects before the census date - you might be able to apply for Special Circumstances. If you’re eligible, we can refund your fees and overturn your fail grade.

If you’re studying Single Subjects using FEE-HELP or paying up front, you can apply online.

If you’re studying a degree using HECS-HELP, you’ll need to apply directly to Macquarie University.

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central. Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Academic Honesty Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/academic_honesty/policy.html

Assessment Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/assessment/policy_2016.html

Grade Appeal Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/gradeappeal/policy.html

Complaint Management Procedure for Students and Members of the Public http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/complaint_management/procedure.html​

Disruption to Studies Policy (in effect until Dec 4th, 2017): http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/disruption_studies/policy.html

Special Consideration Policy (in effect from Dec 4th, 2017): https://staff.mq.edu.au/work/strategy-planning-and-governance/university-policies-and-procedures/policies/special-consideration

In addition, a number of other policies can be found in the Learning and Teaching Category of Policy Central.

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/support/student_conduct/

Results

Results shown in iLearn, or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent. For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au.

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Learning Skills

Learning Skills (mq.edu.au/learningskills) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to improve your marks and take control of your study.

Student Enquiry Service

For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at ask.mq.edu.au

Equity Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

IT Help

For help with University computer systems and technology, visit http://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/information_technology/help/

When using the University's IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use of IT Resources Policy. The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network including students.

Graduate Capabilities

Problem Solving and Research Capability

Our graduates should be capable of researching; of analysing, and interpreting and assessing data and information in various forms; of drawing connections across fields of knowledge; and they should be able to relate their knowledge to complex situations at work or in the world, in order to diagnose and solve problems. We want them to have the confidence to take the initiative in doing so, within an awareness of their own limitations.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Learn basic theories and approaches in philosophy of mind
  • Learn to express your opinion and interpretations of philosophical readings
  • Learn to close-read and evaluate a philosophical text
  • Learn to write an argument and essay

Assessment tasks

  • Participation
  • First essay
  • Final essay

Creative and Innovative

Our graduates will also be capable of creative thinking and of creating knowledge. They will be imaginative and open to experience and capable of innovation at work and in the community. We want them to be engaged in applying their critical, creative thinking.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Learn basic theories and approaches in philosophy of mind
  • Learn to express your opinion and interpretations of philosophical readings
  • Learn to close-read and evaluate a philosophical text
  • Learn to write an argument and essay

Assessment tasks

  • First essay
  • Final essay

Effective Communication

We want to develop in our students the ability to communicate and convey their views in forms effective with different audiences. We want our graduates to take with them the capability to read, listen, question, gather and evaluate information resources in a variety of formats, assess, write clearly, speak effectively, and to use visual communication and communication technologies as appropriate.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • Learn to express your opinion and interpretations of philosophical readings

Assessment tasks

  • First essay
  • Final essay

Engaged and Ethical Local and Global citizens

As local citizens our graduates will be aware of indigenous perspectives and of the nation's historical context. They will be engaged with the challenges of contemporary society and with knowledge and ideas. We want our graduates to have respect for diversity, to be open-minded, sensitive to others and inclusive, and to be open to other cultures and perspectives: they should have a level of cultural literacy. Our graduates should be aware of disadvantage and social justice, and be willing to participate to help create a wiser and better society.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Learn basic theories and approaches in philosophy of mind
  • Learn to express your opinion and interpretations of philosophical readings

Socially and Environmentally Active and Responsible

We want our graduates to be aware of and have respect for self and others; to be able to work with others as a leader and a team player; to have a sense of connectedness with others and country; and to have a sense of mutual obligation. Our graduates should be informed and active participants in moving society towards sustainability.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Learn basic theories and approaches in philosophy of mind
  • Learn to express your opinion and interpretations of philosophical readings

Commitment to Continuous Learning

Our graduates will have enquiring minds and a literate curiosity which will lead them to pursue knowledge for its own sake. They will continue to pursue learning in their careers and as they participate in the world. They will be capable of reflecting on their experiences and relationships with others and the environment, learning from them, and growing - personally, professionally and socially.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Learn basic theories and approaches in philosophy of mind
  • Learn to close-read and evaluate a philosophical text
  • Learn to write an argument and essay

Assessment task

  • Final essay

Capable of Professional and Personal Judgement and Initiative

We want our graduates to have emotional intelligence and sound interpersonal skills and to demonstrate discernment and common sense in their professional and personal judgement. They will exercise initiative as needed. They will be capable of risk assessment, and be able to handle ambiguity and complexity, enabling them to be adaptable in diverse and changing environments.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Learn to express your opinion and interpretations of philosophical readings
  • Learn to write an argument and essay

Discipline Specific Knowledge and Skills

Our graduates will take with them the intellectual development, depth and breadth of knowledge, scholarly understanding, and specific subject content in their chosen fields to make them competent and confident in their subject or profession. They will be able to demonstrate, where relevant, professional technical competence and meet professional standards. They will be able to articulate the structure of knowledge of their discipline, be able to adapt discipline-specific knowledge to novel situations, and be able to contribute from their discipline to inter-disciplinary solutions to problems.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Learn basic theories and approaches in philosophy of mind
  • Learn to express your opinion and interpretations of philosophical readings
  • Learn to close-read and evaluate a philosophical text
  • Learn to write an argument and essay

Assessment tasks

  • Participation
  • Online quizzes
  • First essay
  • Final essay

Critical, Analytical and Integrative Thinking

We want our graduates to be capable of reasoning, questioning and analysing, and to integrate and synthesise learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments; to be able to critique constraints, assumptions and limitations; to be able to think independently and systemically in relation to scholarly activity, in the workplace, and in the world. We want them to have a level of scientific and information technology literacy.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Learn basic theories and approaches in philosophy of mind
  • Learn to express your opinion and interpretations of philosophical readings
  • Learn to close-read and evaluate a philosophical text
  • Learn to write an argument and essay

Assessment tasks

  • Participation
  • Online quizzes
  • First essay
  • Final essay

Changes from Previous Offering

Changes to topics, readings and assessment.

Changes since First Published

Date Description
17/02/2017 Change to due dates for online quizzes.